Angels second baseman Howie Kendrick will avoid the disabled list for now.

An MRI on Howie Kendrick‘s left knee Tuesday revealed a bone bruise and no structural damage, and the Angels will try to wait until week’s end for him to recover before deciding whether to put him on the disabled list or not.

“We’ll give him about four or five days to see how it progresses,” manager Mike Scioscia said. “Obviously he’s very, very sore and very stiff, but we’ll give it a couple days to play out.”

The Angels recalled Grant Green from Triple-A Salt Lake on Tuesday. He is starting at second base against the Texas Rangers and batting eighth. Chris Nelson and Tommy Field can also play the position, and those will be the only options until a decision is rendered on Kendrick.

Scioscia said that Kendrick will travel with the Angels on their seven-game road trip to Cleveland and New York starting Friday.

Kendrick hyperextended his left knee colliding with Collin Cowgill (above) in Monday night’s 5-2 loss to the Rangers.

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Howie Kendrick leaves Angels’ game with hyperextended left knee.

Howie Kendrick left in the fifth inning the Angels’ game against the Texas Rangers on Monday with a hyperextended left knee and did not return. He’s listed as day-to-day.

Kendrick and right fielder Collin Cowgill converged in pursuit of a fly ball to shallow right field hit by Elvis Andrus. Kendrick’s knee collided with Cowgill’s arm as the two players dove for the ball, which bounced between them into right field. Two runs scored on the play, turning a 1-1 game into a 3-1 Rangers lead.

The Rangers led 5-1 in the seventh inning.

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Daily Distractions: Caving to the #whiff, like the rest of Major League Baseball.

There’s an episode of The Simpsons in which Krusty the Clown agreed to give away a free Krusty Burger if the United States won gold at certain events in the 1984 Olympics. When the Soviet Union boycotted the Games, Krusty stood to lose $44 million.

For some reason I was reminded of this episode when this came through my Twitter feed this morning:

CJ Wilson ad

Angels pitcher C.J. Wilson is a pitchman for Head & Shoulders’ hashtag-friendly “Season of the Whiff”.

You see, Procter & Gamble is donating $1 to the Reviving Baseball in Inner Cities (RBI) campaign every time a Major League Baseball player strikes out this season. To raise awareness of its Head & Shoulders shampoo brand, P&G is encouraging fans to tweet the hashtag #whiff along with the hashtag of your favorite team.

According to AdAge.com, Head & Shoulders spent $60 million in measured media last year, so MLB’s record strikeout rate probably won’t leave the company’s executives pulling their hair out like Krusty. Which is good, since bald shampoo executives can’t exactly offer a ringing endorsement of their product.

I’ll be here all week.

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Daily Distractions: The All-Star ballot is out and, hey, Mike Trout is on it this time!

Mike Trout

Angels left fielder Mike Trout has the distinction of making his first All-Star ballot after making his first All-Star team. (Getty Images)

For all the virtues of Mike Trout‘s 2012 season, a place on the All-Star ballot was not among them.

Trout, who started the season in Triple-A, wasn’t one of the three Angels outfielders listed on the 2012 fan ballot. Vernon Wells, Torii Hunter and Peter Bourjos were. Mark Trumbo was listed as a third baseman.

That’s because players’ names must be submitted to the league before MLB’s deadline for printing the ballots, which varies from year to year but typically falls somewhere in late April. The general manager or the assistant GM of each team is responsible for submitting the names. Even Jerry Dipoto couldn’t have foreseen Trout leading the world in runs, stolen bases and WAR last season.

Trout played in the 2012 All-Star Game anyway. He was listed on the players’ ballot distributed in June and collected enough votes to make the American League squad as a reserve.

This year, fans get their chance to vote Trout in. The ballot was released today. The Angels’ other candidates are predictable: Chris Iannetta (catcher), Albert Pujols (first base), Howie Kendrick (second base), Erick Aybar (shortstop), Alberto Callaspo (third base), Mark Trumbo (designated hitter), and Peter Bourjos and Josh Hamilton (outfield).

Some bullet points for a Wednesday morning:

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Postgame thoughts: Rangers 10, Angels 9.

If it were a regular-season game, you’d be talking about it tomorrow. Josh Hamilton’s first game against the Rangers was overshadowed by a lot of things: a walkoff hit, a four-homer inning, a complete implosion by Jerome Williams and — stop the presses — three damn fine throws from behind home plate by Hank Conger.

But since it’s only spring training (checking my watch, yup, one more week…) it’s getting the postgame bullet-point treatment for posterity.

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Dodgers 10, Angels 8: Postgame thoughts.

Howie Kendrick fell a triple short of the cycle Thursday, which would be less impressive if:

a) he hadn’t singled, doubled and homered off major-league starters Clayton Kershaw and Ted Lilly;
b) Kershaw hadn’t also struck out seven batters in three innings.

Kershaw said after the game that his location was erratic. That was never more true than when Kendrick was in the batter’s box against the two-time National League ERA champ. His fifth-inning home run against Lilly was his first of the spring and it was a bomb, landing on the top of a grassy knoll just left of center field in a deep ballpark — Camelback Ranch is 420 feet to straightaway center and Kendrick’s ball definitely traveled farther.

That was the only Angel home run of the game. Kendrick had three of the 12 hits, and nine other players had one each. Here are a few more notes:

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