FAA seeks to fine Hawaiian Airlines $547,500 for failing to inspect Boeing 767

How does Hawaiian Airline schedule its flight attendants and pilots? Photo: Wikimedia commons/Dylan Ashe.

The FAA wants to fine Hawaiian Airlines$547,500.  Photo: Wikimedia commons/Dylan Ashe.

The Federal Aviation Administration wants to fine Hawaiian Airlines $547,500 after the carrier failed to inspect a Boeing 767-300 in compliance with a July 2000 Airworthiness Directive, the agency said in a Monday in a release.

According to the FAA, the directive was designed to ensure that a portion of the thrust reverser would not come off during flight. Had this happened, the FAA said, there would have been a rapid decompression.

“The AD required initial and repetitive inspections of the components to detect damage and wear, and corrective actions if necessary,” the FAA said in the release. “It required replacement of the components with new and improved parts within four years of the AD taking effect.”

Hawaiian spokeswoman Alision Croyled emailed this statement. “We don’t comment on pending litigation. Hawaiian’s first commitment is always to safety. We have requested an informal conference with the FAA to discuss the matter.”

Facebook Twitter Plusone Linkedin Reddit Tumblr Email

Aviation jobs: How Hawaiian Airlines schedules its flight attendants and pilots

How does Hawaiian Airline schedule its flight attendants and pilots? Photo: Wikimedia commons/Dylan Ashe.

How does Hawaiian Airline schedule its flight attendants and pilots? Photo: Wikimedia commons/Dylan Ashe.

How do airlines schedule which flight attendants and pilots work on what flights?

If you think a computer might handle the bulk of this work, you might be right — at least at most airlines. But at Hawaiian Airlines, this process is mostly done by humans. And with so many employees living in so many places, as well as federal regulations governing how much flight crews can work, it’s a complicated process.

 O’Handley

O’Handley

Luckily we have Brad O’Handley, senior director of crew planning and scheduling for Hawaiian, who was kind enough to explain to L.A. Airspace how it all works. Below is our interview, which we conducted via email. ( If you’d like to read my other chats with airline employees, check out earlier Q&As with Southwest Airlines flight dispatcher Mark Johnson and low-cost carrier flight attendant Kara Mulder.)

Brian Sumers: How might you explain your job to someone who does not know much about the airline industry?

Brad O’Handley: Crew schedulers are responsible for staffing all flights in accordance with the Federal Air Regulations (FARs), applicable collective bargaining agreements and company policy.  In general, these rules limit the amount of time a crewmember can remain on duty and set minimum requirements for rest to ensure that crew members are not fatigued when operating their flights. We are also responsible for confirming that hotels and ground transportation to and from the hotels have been secured for crewmembers who will be laying over at an out-of-state destination.

Continue reading

Facebook Twitter Plusone Linkedin Reddit Tumblr Email

Hawaiian Airlines to start new flight between Los Angeles and Maui

Hawaiian Air will fly between Los Angeles and Maui starting July 1.  Photo: Wikimedia commons via Maarten Visser.

Hawaiian Air will fly between Los Angeles and Maui starting July 1 using A330 aircraft. Photo: Wikimedia commons via Maarten Visser.

Hawaiian Airlines will begin a new flight between Los Angeles and Maui on July 1, dumping more than 100,000 seats per year into an already crowded market.

Continue reading

Facebook Twitter Plusone Linkedin Reddit Tumblr Email