What’s news in the world of aviation?

Hello and happy Tuesday. These are some stories I have enjoyed of late.

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Jetblue’s Jenny Dervin answers your questions

A model seen in the Jetblue New York headquarters. Photo: Your blogger.

A model seen in the Jetblue New York headquarters. Photo: Your blogger.

Last week, I visited Jetblue headquarters in Long Island City. N.Y.  Before I left, I asked if any of you had any questions for airline officials. I got a couple of good ones from readers — and here’s what I learned.

The first question came from Andy. He wanted to know if Jetblue plans to improve its facility at LAX, where it shares Terminal 3 with Virgin America and US Airways. 

The short answer is yes, Jetblue officials told me. As many of you know, Jetblue this spring will introduce a new premium section with flatbed seats on flights from LAX to New York. And as part of that service, it would be nice to have an upgraded airport facility. Airline officials told me the fix might come with a move to Terminal 2, but they said it is too premature to know for sure. I will keep you posted on what happens.

The second question came from Chase. He asked: “I’d ask what caused the break in relationship between B6 and AA from B6′s perspective.”

Here’s what Jetblue Vice President of Corporate Communications told me. “‘It’s not you, it’s me,’ kind of applies here,” she said. “Although American did the breaking up, it’s true that the agreement was not performing as expected for either of us. We don’t expect a significant impact to revenue or bookings as a result of the breakup, and very little impact to customers.”

“So I’d say our romance with AA was wonderful while it lasted, but we happily go our separate ways wishing the other well.”

Dervin also said the airline will continue seeking partnerships with major international airlines who need Jetblue to feed U.S. customers into hubs in Boston and New York Kennedy.

“Emirates started their BOS service and needed feed to DTW, which allowed us to fast track opening DTW,” she said. “DTW opened the day Emirates started flying to BOS.”

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Norwegian Air Shuttle tries the U.S. market, and other stories from the week in aviation

Norwegian, a European discount airline, will soon fly from LAX to London, Oslo, Stockholm and Copenhagen. But can it make money?

Norwegian, a European discount airline, will soon fly from LAX to London, Oslo, Stockholm and Copenhagen. But can it make money?

What’s going on in the world of aviation? I’m glad you asked.

Here are some stories I have enjoyed recently.

Emirates and Virgin America will now be frequent flier program partners, writes Ben Mutzabaugh of Today in the Sky.

Norwegian Air Shuttle is trying to be the first major European low-cost carrier to operate a large transatlantic route network. The airline, which is taking delivery of a bunch of Boeing 787s will, by next summer, fly from Los Angeles to Oslo, London, Stockholm and Copenhagen. But will this strategy work? Brett Snyder, who runs the blog crankyflier.com, says he is skeptical. 

By January 1, airports are supposed to take over, from the Transportation Security Administration, the job of guarding terminal exit doors. Bart Jansen of USA Today reports that this change will save the TSA  $88.1 million per year. But many airport executives are not thrilled about this change.

Southwest started by offering double points system wide for passengers during a slow late fall period. United soon followed, with a double miles promotion.” Isn’t it great when competitive forces actually work in favor of consumers?” asks Tim Winship of frequentflier.com.

Delta and United and dueling for West Coast customers, and that’s generally good news for passengers, writes Chris McGinnis, editor of The Bay Area Traveler. 

For several years now, major airlines have tried to artificially keep capacity low in order to hold lower fares. That strategy has worked, and it’s a big part of the reason why most major airlines have been reporting recent profits. But it may not last forever. Edward Russell of Flight Global writes that airlines are adding capacity, especially in the West. 

The A350  hasn’t flown a single passenger flight yet, but the European conglomerate is already considering stretching it, writes Jens Flottau of Aviation Week. 

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