What do people think happened to Malaysia Flight 370?

Where is Malaysia Airlines Flight 370? No one knows, but people love to guess. Photo: Associated Press.

Where is Malaysia Airlines Flight 370? No one knows, but people love to guess. Photo: Associated Press.

What really happened to Malaysia Airlines Flight 370?

The short answer, of course, is we have no idea. But earlier this month, Reason Magazine helped pay for a poll of about 1,000 American adults who were asked their opinions about all sorts of issues in the news. One of those items was Malaysia Airlines Flight 370.

Here’s what folks said about what they think happened to the plane. (My favorite is the “supernatural or alien activity” response.

• It crashed due to mechanical problems 35%

• It was crashed intentionally by the pilots………. 22%

• It was destroyed by terrorists………….. 12%

• It landed safely and is in hiding…………. 9%

• It’s linked to supernatural or alien activity 5%

• It was shot down by a foreign government…….. 3%

• Other (VOL.) …………………………………… 4%

• Don’t Know……………………………………… 9%

• Refused………………………………………….. 1%

• Total…………………………………………… 100%

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Malaysia Airlines, in Los Angeles since 1986, will stop LAX flights in April

Malaysia Airlines will stop service Los Angeles at the end of April. Photo: Malaysia Airlines.

Malaysia Airlines will stop service Los Angeles at the end of April. Photo: Malaysia Airlines.

Malaysia Airlines will pull out of Los Angeles at the end of April to focus on routes within Asia, according to multiple reports.

This is actually potentially bad news for travelers looking for bargain flights to Tokyo. The Malaysian flights to Kuala Lumpur made a stop in Tokyo, and it was possible, sometimes at a discount, to buy tickets between L.A. and Tokyo. For now, the service is operated three times per week on a Boeing 777.

“While MAS has a long history in Los Angeles, this route is no longer economically viable,” chief executive officer Ahmad Jauhari Yahya said in the statement.

“The factors contributing to this negative situation include overcapacity and competition resulting in lower yields, the high cost of operating the B777 aircraft and pressure from fuel cost increases. These are adding further pressure to the expenses of the group, which we are continuously evaluating.”

According to Business Traveller magazine, Malaysia has served Los Angeles since 1986. It will now have no North American routes.

With Malaysia out of the game, that leaves American, United, ANA, JAL, Singapore, and Delta in the Los Angeles-Tokyo market.

Malaysia is part of the OneWorld airline alliance, so it is likely that American and JAL will carry passengers to Tokyo, and then Malaysia will fly them to Kuala Lumpur.

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