L.A. Phil to spotlight Chinese New Year with Disney Hall concerts

By Robert D. Thomas
Music Critic
Los Angeles Newspaper Group

One of the advantages of living in Southern California’s multicultural society is the chance to sample a wider range of holidays than folks in other, more homogenous societies. Case in point: Chinese New Year, which begins tomorrow and runs for 15 days. This is the Year of the Sheep,

zhangcolorThe Los Angeles Philharmonic will celebrate the festival for the first time with concerts on Feb. 19, 20 and 21 at Walt Disney Concert Hall. Rising conductor star Xian Zhang leads a program that mixes music by Chopin, Saint-Säens and Tchaikovsky with selections by Li Huanzhi and Tan Dun.

The latter is represented by the West Coast premiere of Dun’s The Triple Resurrection, the fourth installment in Dun’s “Martial Arts Cycle,” a set of concertos based on his famous film scores. The work uses themes and musical characters (violin, cello, and piano) from Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon, Hero and The Banquet. Soloists will include Jin Wang, cello, Ning Feng, violin, and Haochen Zhang, piano, gold medalist in the 2009 Van Cliburn International Piano Competition.

The Triple Resurrection will also be presented at Hollywood Bowl on August 13 when the composer will conduct his own works accompanied by film clips.

The Disney Hall concerts are part of the Phil’s $20 ticket offer and traditional Chinese New Year celebrations will follow each concert.

Information: www.laphil.com
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(c) Copyright 2015, Robert D. Thomas. All rights reserved. Portions may be quoted with attribution.

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NEWS: Another American orchestra looks for a music director

By Robert D. Thomas
Music Critic
Los Angeles Newspaper Group

Another major American symphony orchestra is looking for a music director, following today’s announcement that the National Symphony Orchestra in Washington, D.C. will not renew Christoph Eschenbach’s contract when it expires following the 2016-2017 season. He become Conductor Laureate for three years.

The NSO joins the New York Philharmonic on the lookout; the NYPO’s music director, Alan Gilbert, will leave after at the same time as Eschenbach (LINK).

Anne Midgette in the Washington Post has the news on Eschenbach’s departure HERE and Tim Smith (Baltimore Sun) chimes in HERE.
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(c) Copyright 2015, Robert D. Thomas. All rights reserved. Portions may be quoted with attribution.

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L.A. Chamber Orchestra plumbs Mozart’s Requiem; L.A. Phil takes on “Alice in Wonderland”

By Robert D. Thomas
Music Critic
Los Angeles Newspaper Group

• When Jeffrey Kahane began his “Discover” series of one-off concerts with the Los Angeles Chamber Orchestra at Ambassador Auditorium several years ago, it was to examine Beethoven symphonies in depth. Having exhausted most of those works (at least the familiar ones), Kahane & Co. turn to Mozart’s Requiem in D Minor on Thursday at 8 p.m. for the next installment.

There are plenty of opportunities for examination. Mozart left the piece unfinished and most conductors have used an ending supposedly finished by the composer’s friend, Franz Süssmayr. However in the 1990s, fortepianist and Mozart scholar Robert Levin published his own completion and this is the edition Kahane will use when he conducts the orchestra, Los Angeles Master Chorale and soloists in the second half of the program.

In the first half, actors John Sloan and JD Cullum from The Antaeus Company will join with Kahane to tell the Requiem’s story.

Single tickets are $25-$115. BTW: check the Web site for parking instructions, which are different than for Pasadena Symphony concerts.

Information: www.laco.org

• While Los Angeles Opera remains immersed in its “Figaro Trilogy” — The Ghost of Versailles continues its run through March 1, The Barber of Seville opens Feb. 28 and The Marriage of Figaro begins March 21 — the Los Angeles Philharmonic jumps into the operatic fray on Feb. 27 and 28 in Walt Disney Concert Hall with West Coast-premiere performances of Alice in Wonderland by Korean composer Unsuk Chin.

This is a new production by video artist Netia Jones who, in addition to being director, also designed the costumes and sets. She will use illustrations by Ralph Steadman (Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas) and combine those with live action and interactive animated projections.

There’s a cast of 12 in the opera — many playing multiple roles — along with members of the L.A. Master Chorale and L.A. Children’s Chorus. The performances will be conducted by rising Finnish star Susanna Mälkki, who was recently named chief conductor of the Helsinki Philharmonic Orchestra and has made a strong impression in previous L.A. Phil concerts.

Incidentally, LA Opera is listed as a “collaborator” on this production although the company has made no mention of this on its Web site or publicity materials. LAO reportedly has been miffed about the Phil invading its turf with opera productions at Disney Hall in recent years so perhaps this “collaboration” was a way to mollify hurt feelings.

Information: www.laphil.com

If Chin’s contemporary take on Lewis Carroll’s classic isn’t your cup of tea, another young woman conductor with a growing rep, Mirga Gražinytė-Tyla — the Phil’s new assistant conductor — will lead a program of Mozart’s The Abduction from the Seraglio overture, Stravinsky’s Petrushka and Beethoven’s Symphony No. 7 on March 1 at Disney Hall.

Information: www.laphil.com
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(c) Copyright 2015, Robert D. Thomas. All rights reserved. Portions may be quoted with attribution.

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Violinist Dylana Jenson: the backstory to an upcoming concert

By Robert D. Thomas
Music Critic
Los Angeles Newspaper Group

Violinist Dylana Jenson will appear as soloist with the Pasadena Symphony on Feb. 14 — read my preview story HERE.

Jenson’s struggles to find a violin that sings to and through her soul have been detailed in several postings. One is Jenson’s interview with Pasadena-based violinist and blogger Laurie Niles HERE. Another is an interview with violinist Robert L. Jones HERE.

An article by Donald Rosenberg in the Cleveland Plain Dealer is particularly illuminating because details the struggles of violinists to find just the right instrument — as Rosenberg puts it, “a cautionary tale for anyone in search of the instrument that best reflects his or her artistic soul” — Read it HERE.

As I read Rosenberg’s article, I was struck by the similarities between Jenson and organist Cameron Carpenter, who grew so frustrated with the organs on which he has played throughout his career that he built his own instrument. Read my story HERE.

My late wife was a concert pianist and I remember our long search for exactly the “right” piano for her. I was struck by the differences between the many instruments that she played, which included several Steinways. Finally when she sat down at a Baldwin L, she (and I) could hear that this was “Jennifer’s piano.”

FURTHER NOTES:
Jenson’s recording of the Sibelius Violin Concerto with Ormandy and the Philadelphia Orchestra is still available on compact disc. The recording of the Shostakovich and Barber Violin Concertos she made in 2008 with David Lockington and the London Symphony Orchestra is available as a download through cdbaby.com HERE.
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(c) Copyright 2015, Robert D. Thomas. All rights reserved. Portions may be quoted with attribution.

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NEWS: Alan Gilbert to step down as NY Phil music director in 2017

By Robert D. Thomas
Music Critic
Los Angeles Newspaper Group

In one of the more surprising developments in classical music recently, Alan Gilbert has told the New York Philharmonic that he will step down as the orchestra’s music director in 2017 after eight seasons on the job.

Now age 47, Gilbert told Michael Cooper in the New York Times that, “It’s become clear that the next chapter, logically, has to carry the organization through to the opening of [the planned renovation of Avery Fisher] hall, which is at the earliest 2021. It’s a wonderful atmosphere, which of course I will be sorry to leave. But as I’ve thought about it, the next logical step — it’s just longer than I want to stay around. It’s actually that simple.”

Read Cooper’s entire article HERE. Cooper has a followup article on possible replacements HERE. Anne Midgette in the Washington Post has her early list of candidates HERE.

My winterbook favorites are Simon Rattle and Esa-Pekka Salonen but whether either want to be involved in the fund raising for and contentious remake of Avery Fisher Hall and the two years that the NY Phil would have to find temporary quarters will be surely be among the major questions.
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(c) Copyright 2015, Robert D. Thomas. All rights reserved. Portions may be quoted with attribution.

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