Marshall Tuck campaign releases new video

The Marshall Tuck campaign released a new video this morning featuring some new endorsers. Kristen Bell, Dax Shepard, Joel McHale and Adam Scott have thrown their support behind Marshall in a funny new video featuring the four actors lending their political expertise to Tuck’s campaign.

Watch the video, here.

“This election is so important that I sat down with Joel McHale, Adam Scott, and some handsome devil named Dax Shepard to get the facts from Marshall and provide some high-level strategy from today’s sharpest political minds,” said Kristen Bell, actress, parent and activist. “[And] as a parent, I want to make sure we give every child access to a great education.”

While the video provides some much needed humor in the middle of a heated campaign, it does take a serious look at several key issues facing the race, including the state of education in California today,

Walnut honors band boosters at LA Fair

By Richard Irwin, Staff Write

The Los Angeles County Fair honored more community heroes on Friday. Every year, the fair celebrates the volunteers, students and seniors who make their communities a better place to live.

This year, Walnut chose Lou and Joanie Simonelli for their volunteer work. The couple have spent many hours working for the band boosters at Walnut High School.

Walnut’s Community Services Superintendent Alicia Jensen noted Simonelli’s dedication has lasted well past the years in which their own children went to high school.

“The Community Services Department received a letter signed by 134 kids from Walnut High School praising and thanking the Simonelli’s for their efforts,” Jensen said in her nomination.

Dubbed the Bandfather, Lou has driven thousands of miles with a pile of instruments behind him. The couple also build and maintain the play sets and pit carts. Along the way, these community heroes have touched the lives of many students, parents and teachers.

Walnut High drama performs “The Understudy”

The Walnut High School Drama Department is bringing to the stage The Understudy by Eddie McPherson, presented in theatre-in-the round. Drama teacher Joanne Karr directs the talented cast in this murder-mystery comedy.

Acting can be murder!  Dolores Gordon, who loves the stage, has always dreamed of stardom. But the only role she ever seems to land is that of the lowly understudy.

So she decides the only way she is going to land the lead role in an upcoming community theatre production is to murder the lead actress, Guinevere Black. And that is exactly what she does.

To make the murder more fun, Dolores hides Guinevere’s body in a large wooden trunk that is used as the centerpiece of the production. She realizes her worst nightmare when she discovers the body has disappeared.

But who took it? Find out in this comedy that spoofs Agatha Christie and Alfred Hitchcock all in one-keep-you-guessing backstage comedy.

Shows are October 1-4 at 7 p.m. and a 2 p.m. matinee on October 4. General admission tickets are $10 in advance and $12 at the door. Tickets may be bought online at www.seatyourself.biz/walnutdrama or at the door. For information, please call (909) 594-133 ext. 34212.

 

The Walnut High Performing Arts Center is located at 400 N. Pierre Road in Walnut.

Mt SAC art exhibit explores ‘Way of Flesh II’

The Mt. San Antonio College Art Gallery begins a new season with “The Way of Flesh II,” which runs Sept. 18 through Oct. 16. This exhibit is free and open to the public.

“The Way of Flesh II” displays the legacy of figurative art through the eyes of three generations of contemporary artists. This exhibition offers inventive approaches to rendering the figure in the classical tradition.

“The Way of Flesh II” picks up 20 years after the original “The Way of Flesh” exhibit at the Mt. SAC gallery in 1994. A special opening reception will be held from 4:30 to 7 p.m. on Sept. 18 in the Art Gallery, building 1B.

Participating artists are Sigmund AbelesSharon AllicottiJuliette AristidesSteven AssaelRon Brown, Dawn Butler, Thomas Butler,Wes ChristensenDomenic CretaraDirk HagnerF. Scott Hess, Jared Linge, Pamela Diaz MartinezDaina MattisJohn Nava, Odd Nerdrum, Ryan SchroederRobert SchultzLuis E. SerranoBetty SheltonRichard Shelton, Cynthia Sitton, Thomas StubbsRuth WeisbergJerome Witkin, and Peter Zokosky. 

An artists’ panel for the exhibit will be held 1 to 4 p.m. Sept. 28. 

Gallery hours are Tuesdays through Thursdays, 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., and Tuesday nights, 5 to 7:30 p.m. For more information, call the Art Gallery at (909) 274-4328. 

Rowland Unified names new superintendent

Dr. Julie Mitchell has been named the new superintendent of Rowland Unified.

Dr. Julie Mitchell has been named the new superintendent of Rowland Unified.

By Rowland Unified School District

The Rowland Unified School District Board of Education announced at tonight’s meeting that Julie Mitchell, Ed.D., Chief Personnel Officer from Tustin Unified School District, has been appointed as the new Superintendent of Schools for Rowland Unified.

After an extensive five-month search process, the Board chose Mitchell for her broad and established instructional leadership roles across all grade levels, strength in collaboration and focus on increasing student learning and achievement. Her start date is October 1, 2014.

“The Board looks forward to welcoming Mitchell to our organization and to the families that we serve,” said Rowland USD Board President Heidi L. Gallegos. “Dr. Mitchell stood out among the highly qualified field of candidates for her passion and proven track record in making student-focused decisions that support academic success.”

“She has in-depth expertise in instructional strategies and models using technology, innovative professional development programs, and breadth in curriculum,” Gallegos said. “Her strength as a communicator and a collaborative leader focused on building positive relationships will continue Rowland’s successes. We want to thank our entire community who played an active role during this very public process, and we believe that Mitchell will be a visionary leader and a great match for our staff, students and community.”

Mitchell has 26 years of experience in public education. She has served as an instructional aide, middle and high school teacher, assistant principal, principal and assistant superintendent of human resources in school districts including Anaheim Union, Capistrano and Irvine.

For the past seven years as the chief personnel officer – a top-level district administrator in Tustin Unified – Mitchell was involved in the development of programs focused on curriculum, student learning and achievement, personnel leadership, professional learning communities, technology, college preparedness and signature instructional practices, such as Reader’s Workshop, Writer’s Workshop and Cognitively Guided Instruction (CGI).

She also assisted with the passage of two bond measures: a $95 million school facilities modernization bond and a $135 million new technology bond for K-12 students and 21stcentury classrooms throughout the school district.

Mitchell has a strong personnel background with extensive experience in employee relations and contract negotiations and the creation and implementation of comprehensive professional development and leadership programs for teachers, classified support staff and management.

She also established a partnership to implement the Cotsen Foundation Program transforming capable educators into gifted teachers at schools throughout Tustin USD.

Her leadership has been recognized at the local, regional and state levels as the 2011 Orange County Personnel/Human Resources Administrator of the Year by the Association of California School Administrators (ACSA), Region 17, and as the 2012 State Negotiator of the Year by ACSA.

Mitchell has a bachelor’s degree in social science from San Diego University, a master’s degree in education from the University of La Verne and received her doctorate in administration/management from Pepperdine University. Mitchell is married with three children.

“I am excited and honored to have been chosen as the new superintendent and look forward to working collaboratively with the school board, staff, parents and community,” Mitchell said. “I’m committed to providing all students with an exceptional educational experience which will assist them with becoming productive members of an ever-changing global society.”

The Rowland USD Board was committed to a rigorous superintendent search process and with providing the community clear and comprehensive information and input that began last April.

The firm Hazard, Young, Attea & Associates was hired and conducted focus groups, community meetings and an online survey to provide extensive input on the desired qualities of the next superintendent.

Consistent themes shared included a person who held a deep understanding of the teaching/learning process and the importance of educational technology, a leader who was approachable/accessible, a leader who could articulate a clear and consistent message, who believed in public education, who was collaborative and someone who could build trust. More than 50 applicants applied for the position.

During the superintendent search process, the Board appointed John A. Roach, Ed.D, as Interim Superintendent in June.  Roach will continue to serve until the end of September and will work with Mitchell for a smooth leadership transition.

The Rowland Unified School District is proud to serve 15,000 students in the communities of Rowland Heights, Walnut, La Puente, City of Industry and West Covina at our award-winning schools.

Mt. Calvary Lutheran school takes ALS challenge in Diamond Bar

Ice bucket challenge #2
Last week, the whole school at Mt. Calvary Lutheran in Diamond Bar, from preschool through 8th grade, got the chance to watch their pastor, Pastor John Scharlemann, and two church members, Sebe Garton and George Grinham, participate in the ice bucket challenge.
They did this to support a teacher whose sister passed away from ALS a few years ago.  This was a fun way to kick off the 31st school year.

Tech Trek grads to speak in Diamond Bar

Tech Trek is an annual science/math camp for Middle School aged girls held in July at UC Irvine. Four eighth grade scholarship recipients will report on their experiences at 6:30 p.m. on Sept. 22 in the Windmill Room at Diamond Bar City Hall.

The speakers are Roya Rezvani of Chaparral Middle School, Theresa Lin and Kyla Jennell of Suzanne Middle School, and Ying Wang of South Pointe Middle School.

Everyone is welcome at this public event co-sponsored by the Diamond Bar-Walnut AAUW and the Friends of the Library.

Walnut Valley begins first day of school

By Kelli Gile, Walnut Valley Unified

It’s back-to-school time in the Walnut Valley Unified School District. Nearly 14,600 students began classes in the 15 campuses on Monday, August 18.

“We had a great first day,” said Walnut High School Principal Jeff Jordan. ”Students and staff were excited to be back. There was an upbeat attitude all day.”

The teens happily chatted at break time, stopped by their lockers, and checked schedules before dashing off to their next class.

Maple Hill Elementary in Diamond Bar opened doors to its completely modernized campus in Diamond Bar.

Everyone was relocated to portable buildings during the $5.6 million construction project last year.

This was the first chance for students and their families to see the new school.

“We made it!” exclaimed Principal Nancy Stingley. “Everybody’s here and inside, everybody’s happy, and everybody’s smiling.”

“Wellyn’s very lucky she’s going to a brand new school,” said kindergarten parent Jocelyn Wong.

Fourth graders Gabrielle Zabresky, Valentina Yonemoto, Carlie Law and Ella Liu were excited to see their new classrooms before the school bell rang.

What do they like best about school?

“We love math – it’s fun!’ the girls exclaimed.

“It’s really nice,” commented parent Grace Wang just outside her child’s classroom.

Fifth grade teacher Shirley Conner greeted students who were lined up before the 8 a.m.school bell rang.

“Welcome back to school. It’s beautiful inside!” she said

“It’s such a gift to us,” beamed fourth grade teacher Tami Berry.

“Everything’s new and wonderful, and different. As we had time to get to know the school, you all will have time to get to know the school,” she told her students.

“It’s going to be a very fun place to learn,” Berry added.

The school has a brand-new interior design, multipurpose room and exterior landscaping. Classrooms feature state-of-the-art technology, skylights and generous storage cabinets. Six hundred new desks and chairs were purchased for the campus.

“It’s big and roomy, everything is clean and new, and up-to-date technologically,” said kindergarten teacher Lisa Esse, who has been at the school for 20 years.

“And every teacher is excited!”

“It’s like a new beginning for us. It’s beautiful, it’s kid-friendly and we have a lot of new technology that we didn’t have before,” said third grade teacher Sue Conrad-Kanstul.

Teachers will now use wireless microphones and be able project assignments using cool mobile stations that adjust up and down, she explained.

Kanstul is happy that she will no longer have her back to the screen while at the front of the class.

“The kids used to say ‘Mrs. Kanstul I can’t see the board.’ And now I can watch what I’m projecting. I would say it’s 21st century.”

“I look forward to another great school year at Suzanne Middle School,” said Principal Les Ojeda.

“We have a great number of returning students and new students that seem incredibly intelligent, enthusiastic and eager to learn.”

Westhoff Elementary celebrated the first day of school with balloons, chalk greetings, posters, music and a staff with welcoming smiles.

“It’s going to be a great school year!” said Principal Denise Rendon.

La Puente girls get new shoes, backpacks

By Richard Irwin, Staff Writer

Local companies gathered Friday to help low-income girls get ready for the new school year in Rowland Unified. The generous gifts included new shoes, backpacks, school supplies and haircuts.

More than 300 students from Villa Corta, Hurley and Northam elementary schools were selected by school staff for the sixth annual Aldabella Scarpa Giveback Event.

The Covina shoe designer started the event as a way of encouraging young women in low-income areas.

“We want these young girls to have an amazing, positive experience and not allow circumstances in their lives to create limits,” said co-founder Monica Gonzales. “We want to show them that our community supports them and we want them to dream big.”

Gonzales and her sister, Ann Marie Smith, went to school at Villa Corta and wanted to do something special for the La Puente school. So six years ago, they began giving a new pair of shoes to deserving students.

Over the years, the event has continued to grow as more sponsors joined the ranks. California Credit Union provides new backpacks filled with school supplies. Other sponsors include Walmart, Global Processing System, Krispy Kreme, Starbucks and Stater Brothers.

Free haircuts were given by Supercuts of West Covina, helped by OMG Hair Accessories.

“The part I like the best is the kids’ smiles,” said Villa Corta Principal John Martinez. “It shows our students that lots of people in our community support them.”

Martinez will welcome 525 students in transitional kindergarten to sixth grade on Monday, when Rowland Unified begins the new school year. The young women will have everything they need to start school.

Families flocked around four tables filled with craft activities courtesy of Home Depot in Industry. The Cake Mamas from Glendora were very popular, giving out their award-winning cupcakes. The backpacks even included coupons for free food from Taco Nazo in La Puente.

Sara Posadas, 12, of La Puente loves the five pairs of shoes she received while attending Villa Corta. Now, she was helping her 8-year-old sister Johana get ready for the fourth grade.

“I was always excited to get new shoes and a backpack,” Sara recalled. “Now my sister is excited too.”

The Romero sisters from Northam Elementary agreed. Dayanara, 9, and Jennesse, 6, were both loaded down with their new shoes and backpacks.

“Their family says this is a big help for them,” translated Principal Martinez.

For the sisters, they incorporated the donation as part of their business model. Smith and Monica Gonzales design shoes for their Covina boutique Aldabella Scarpa at 832 N. Grand Ave. The company donates a pair of “I Matter” tennis shoes to disadvantaged youths for every set sold in stores. The shoes retail for $42.

The sisters say their great-grandfather was a shoe designer in Mexico. He passed his craft on to their grandfather and father.

“They were both cobblers in Monterey, Mexico,” Gonzales explained. “So we always knew the importance of quality shoes.”

The Spanish-speaking women grew up in La Puente, where they learned the importance of education in the Rowland Unified schools. Smith became a educator, serving 24 years as a teacher and administrator.

“It was hard starting a new business during the recession, but our company has grown slowly on-line at www.aldascarpa.com,” Gonzales said. “Today, we employ 10 people, who handle sales of more than $500,000 a year.”

And the Covina company recently added an clothing line to its inventory.

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Rowland teachers train for Common Core

By Richard Irwin

It may be called Common Core, but the teaching techniques are anything but common. As instructors in Rowland Unified discovered during two days of workshops.

School districts have been gearing up for the implementation of Common Core over the past couple of years. Anxious teachers have been learning how to adapt their teaching styles to the new guidelines.

“They’re anxious because it sounds like everything is new,” explained Jeanette Chien, Rowland’s executive director of educational services. “But this is their opportunity to share ideas because we need to teach differently for Common Core.”

She says the goal is to develop students who can think independently. This is quite a change from the memorization that many of us grew up with.

“The instruction will be more rigorous for both the students and the teachers,” Chien said. “But, we need to do a better job of preparing our students for college and careers afterward.”

For more read http://m.sgvtribune.com/sgvtribune/article/dkI6bzAU