Wigging out

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I’ve always wondered why, traditionally, wig shops are concentrated on Hollywood Boulevard, always with bewigged rows of foam heads in the window, such as in the photo above.

Then, disconcertingly, a wig shop opened a few weeks ago on Bonita and Yale avenues in Claremont, seen below. It’s just east of the ice cream shop.

A question I never thought I’d ask: Is Claremont the new Hollywood?

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  • Deb

    Hmmmm… Your interest in wig shops is disconcerting… Don’t do it Dave!

    [Ha ha! That would be a rather jarring transformation, wouldn't it? -- DA]

  • Ramona

    I see “hair restoration services” are also offered. Wouldn’t that cancel out the wig sales?

    Deb is correct. Bald is beautiful. And you don’t have to be concerned about buying “hair tools,” whatever those may be.

    Claremont the new Hollywood? Nah. Never happen.

    (PS: Hate, hate, hate the captcha feature.)

    [I'm not crazy about it myself, although in lieu of a decent spam filter captcha is performing that function admirably. -- DA]

  • http://empoprise-ie.blogspot.com/ John E. Bredehoft

    Your concluding question caused me to wonder what movies were filmed in Claremont. There are a number of sources for this information; for example, http://www.insidecollege.com/reno/Campuses-Where-Movies-Were-Filmed/764/list.do notes that “Lions for Lambs” was filmed at Claremont-McKenna College; and that Pomona College was used in the “Gilmore Girls” television series, “Beaches,” “Over the Top,” “Eleanor and Franklin” television movie, and “The Absent Minded Professor.”

    It’s a little disconcerting, however, to realize that some people may base their college choices on movie locations (“And just WHY did you want to attend the University of Oregon, Mr. Niedermeyer?”).

  • Catherine Brundage

    Maybe, rather, it’s that Bonita Avenue is the new Hollywood Blvd. Don’t forget the lovely rows of wig display lining the windows of the beauty shop, just steps away from Roady’s in Old Town San Dimas.

  • shirley wofford

    This is really intriguing, to learn of a wig shop in the area. Such was not uncommon, in the decade of the 70′s. Some, who were not yet born then, might not know that there was a wig department in every store, and everybody wore them.

    My wig was a bubble do, and I had it styled and teased at the May Co. that had an extensive wig department. I wore my wig to work every day. It was not against any rules to smoke in the work place, then — I shared my space with two men who smoked cigarettes and another one, who smoked cigars. I’m sure that you can imagine what my “hair” smelled like.

    I hate to think what one of those wigs costs at the Claremont shop now, compared to what they were, back in the day. It would be nice to try on a style and color different from my own, senior-citizen, gray bob. If the fad were to come back, at least the gals in offices could go home without smelling.

    [Shirley, thanks for the look back at a more wig-ful era. -- DA]