Two days in LA

I haven’t shared anything here about a Metrolink weekend in a while, but I had one this past weekend. You can read about, and see photos of, some of the activities below on my Twitter page, @davidallen909. In short, I bought a $10 weekend pass and took off.

Saturday I rode the Purple Line and the Rapid bus to LACMA, where I got in for free through a great deal for BofA customers: free admission the first full weekend of the month. After a snack at one of the lineup of food trucks across the street, I caught a couple of exhibits, met up with a friend and saw “Levitated Mass,” the 340-ton rock. Very big, very cool. (Seeing the rock is free to all.)

We walked to the Farmers Market and had a late lunch at Short Order, then walked back to LACMA where I took the bus and subway back to Union Station.

Sunday I took the new Expo line to the 33rd Street stop and walked to Mercado La Paloma, where I had lunch at Chichen Itza, a Yucatecan restaurant. I had conchinita pibil (a kind of slow-roasted pork), which I’d been introduced to in Mexico City, as a torta. Quite good. I then walked along Jefferson to Exposition Park and strolled through the Rose Garden before taking the Expo Line back downtown.

There, I peeked around the green construction barrier to eyeball the Grand Park between City Hall and Bunker Hill, which opens later this summer, before walking back to Union Station for the ride home.

On both Metrolink rides, I read newspapers and almost the entirety of H.P. Lovecraft’s novella “At the Mountains of Madness” while leaving the driving to others. And all those trips and transfers cost only $10.

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LA Times posts correction on lobby flub

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Back in August I posted here about a visit to the L.A. Times lobby, where among the historical items on display are a linotype machine and the last page set with hot type, only with explanatory plaques reversed — the hot type page plaque reading “This is a linotype machine…” and the linotype machine plaque reading “This is the last plate of hot type set at the Los Angeles Times…” How long had this been wrong, I wondered?

Well, I went downtown last Friday on a day off to visit the City Hall observation deck, which is only accessible on business days. (Highly recommended, by the way.) While in the neighborhood, I decided to pop into the Times lobby to see if the plaques had been fixed.

They had. See photos!

I’ll share credit with the LAObserved blog, which picked up on my item — gratifying headline: “Times wrong about its own museum, says columnist” — and gave it a much wider audience, evidently including whoever at the Times needed to know. Nice job, and schoolchildren and other visitors should no longer leave their educational visit more confused than when they entered.

There is no sign posted saying “The Times regrets the error.” But I’m sure they do.

Why is it called the Globe Lobby? Its centerpiece, below, should make that clear.

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‘Everybody’s quoting Manchester Boddy’

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I saw this framed advertisement in the Boddy House at Descanso Gardens in La Canada Flintridge on a recent visit. (Sorry for the poor photo.) Manchester Boddy not only wrote a column, he owned the old L.A. Daily News from 1926 to 1954.

His Daily News was the only L.A. paper to support FDR. Boddy ran unsuccessfully for senator against Helen Gahagan Douglas in 1950’s Democratic primary, in which he labeled her the “Pink Lady,” paving the way for Congressman Richard Nixon to defeat her in the general election.

Evidently Boddy was a columnist for his newspaper as well. I’d love to have the Daily Bulletin describe my column as “brilliant” and on everyone’s lips — but it might help if, like Boddy, I signed the promotional department’s paychecks.

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‘Safety Last!’

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I saw this silent classic Wednesday night at the Orpheum Theater on Broadway in downtown L.A., the last film in this year’s “Last Remaining Seats” series sponsored by the L.A. Conservancy. Harold Lloyd’s 1923 film in the lovely 1926 theater made for a great combo.

Notes Wikipedia: “It includes one of the most famous images from the silent film era: Lloyd clutching the hands of a large clock as he dangles from the outside of a skyscraper above moving traffic.”

The movie is highly recommended, and the clock scene — filmed not far from the theater itself — got an ovation.

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The Civil Wars at Amoeba

Four of us from the newsroom left work Tuesday at a decent hour for a change and sped to Hollywood’s Amoeba Music for an in-store performance by the Civil Wars, whose debut CD, “Barton Hollow,” is recommended to fans of Robert Plant/Alison Kraus’ “Raising Sand,” Gram Parsons/Emmylou Harris or even the Everly Brothers. The close-harmony duo was playing at Largo that night and are also performing Thursday night at the El Rey.

Joy Williams and John Paul White, whose romantic ballads tend toward the serious, turned out to be playful and utterly charming in live performance. They performed for a half-hour as the audience stood in the record stacks.

Aside from a half-dozen of their own songs, they did a slow cover of “Billie Jean” (versions from other venues are posted to YouTube). They also challenged the audience to guess who was responsible for their final song and to find the CD. Here’s an excerpt of that:

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Million Dollar Theater

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Wednesday night I attended the L.A. Conservancy’s Last Remaining Seats program at downtown LA’s Million Dollar Theater. The 1918 movie palace is unrestored and not in the best of condition, but it’s still pretty neat, and the exterior is spectacular. We saw “Captain Blood,” a 1935 pirate movie with Errol Flynn and Olivia de Havilland. Great fun.

There are still three more movies in the series, each on Wednesday nights, at different theaters on Broadway. (Two of the three are already sold out.) Click here for a schedule. I’ve got a ticket for “Safety Last” on the 29th.

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LA got there first

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Remember how Ontario has been seeking (for almost two years now) a liquor license for its library cafe? One retired Ontario cop likes to reverse the idea of a bar in the library, joking: “Let’s put a library in the bar.”

I was reminded of all that on Sunday when I met friends at downtown LA’s Library Bar.

LA’s version isn’t really in the library — the Central Library is a block away — but this gastropub has a wall of books in a cozy area with couches, rugs and a fireplace, akin to one of those personal libraries in a country estate, and drinks have literary names: the Scarlet Letter, the Tequila Mockingbird, the Odyssey, etc. My friends liked the drinks (I stuck to cranberry juice) and we all liked the food: burgers, fries, beet salad, edamame and pork belly sandwich.

The Library Bar. What will they think of next?

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Buff’s-eye view

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There’s a downtown L.A. park under construction between Bunker Hill and City Hall, and one of the best places to get an overall glimpse is from the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion, L.A.’s opera hall.

Here’s a recent, if rainy, view from the fourth floor balcony level overlooking Grand Avenue. The nosebleed tier provides a better view of the construction than the swells get. That’s the County Hall of Administration in the background.

Chandler, you may recall, was nicknamed Buff because of her maiden name, Buffum, and yes, her family owned the Buffum’s department store chain.

The $56 million Grand Avenue Civic Park, set to open in May 2012, will include “lawns, performance spaces, seating areas, walking paths, vegetation, an upgraded fountain and even a dog park,” says the L.A. Downtown News.

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Dining with the bloggers (part 3)

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Mike Tanner, who produces the excellent L.A.-based blog Dinerwood with reviews of coffee shops (especially ones serving pie), and I met up for breakfast in Whittier. The site was Jack’s. Is this Jack’s connected with the one that used to be at 19th and Carnelian in Rancho Cucamonga? I suspect so, although I don’t know.

Mike and I had met up a couple of times before, once at Roady’s in San Dimas, the other time at LeRoy’s in Monrovia. He tossed out a couple of options for a third get-together and I picked Jack’s based primarily on its amazing out-of-the-past sign. Love the Erector-set pole too.

There’s a great, long counter inside with swivel seats in the classic style. We got a booth and hunkered down for what turned out to be an only average meal. The corned beef hash with my eggs was the best part and it was probably out of a can. The country potatoes were mushy, not crisp. Mike wasn’t blown away by his waffle. Service was inattentive. We skipped the pie.

Conversation was the highlight. Well, that and the sign.

Here’s Mike’s take, with lots of photos. He was no more inspired by Jack’s than I was.

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Dining with the bloggers (part 2)

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I had dinner in Highland Park last weekend with the Bulletin’s RC Now blogger, Wendy Leung. Not only is RC Now your top source for Rancho Cucamonga news and views, it’s often darn funny even if you don’t care about Rancho Cucamonga. Well, I can only imagine it would be — who doesn’t care about Rancho Cucamonga?

Wendy had a coupon from the Good Girl Dinette, a restaurant that is said to meld Vietnamese dishes with American comfort food. I’d been there a couple of times for lunch and liked it. Even better, it’s only a couple of blocks from a Gold Line station.

We had Vietnamese spring rolls, spicy fries with garlic and a soy-based dipping sauce, and two pot pies, one chicken, one vegetarian. The pot pies are one of the restaurant’s signature dishes. They were curry-like, came in a dish and had a biscuit-like top. We liked all our dishes.

Good Girl is on LA Weekly’s LA99 list of great restaurants. We met there early and by the time we left, near 8 p.m., the place was nearly full.

I’ll have a third and final (?) blogging-related meal in L.A. to post about as soon as the other blogger finishes his writeup and I can link to it.

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