Two views of Magu

The painter and sculptor Gilbert “Magu” Lujan was featured in my “Pomona A to Z” series of columns in 2004, representing the letter M. A pioneering figure in the Chicano art movement, and in later years a resident of the Pomona Arts Colony, he died in 2011. But he’s still remembered.

Lujan’s work was the subject of a PST: LA/LA show, and across from the dA Center for the Arts in downtown Pomona, a utility box’s mural pays homage. See above. I suspect the (Grauman’s?) dragon is a reference to his most-seen work, the Hollywood-themed decor of the Hollywood and Vine Metro station. Magu’s pose is clearly based on the portrait by my colleague Will Lester for my column about him, which is included in my “Pomona A to Z” book. If the artist’s name turns up, I’ll credit him/her.

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A long string of lights

A reader phoned to tell me the home at Lincoln and Washington streets in Pomona had “a cool lighting display that you can see from several blocks away.” A visit one night last week showed what he meant: Lights are strung up and down a tall tree in the yard. (Side note: What could be more American than living at the corner of Lincoln and Washington?)

It’s a notable home, directly across from Kingsley Elementary School and in the 1950s occupied by the Provost family, whose young son, Jon, was a star of the “Lassie” TV show. The home was bought this year by Ray Adamyk, head of the Spectra Co., which is restoring the YMCA building. In other words, he’s a man who knows where to get a crane.

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Inside (and outside) the Pomona YMCA

The old Pomona YMCA was part of the Home Tour Nov. 5, and I was there. Here are a few photos. The one above was shot a few days before from inside the American Museum of Ceramic Art, directly across from the Y. Handsome building, isn’t it?

The Y was bought for $2.65 million by the Spectra Co., a Pomona-based builder that specializes in historic preservation, and which plans to give the 1922 building a badly needed renovation before using it as its headquarters. Work has begun and original details that have been long buried are coming to light.

Inside, we were told that this neat white hexagonal tile was revealed in spots where a later layer of flooring was removed.

Above, a view of the basketball court. Note the elevated area on three sides…

That elevated area above the basketball court is a running track with, how fancy, banked turns. This is a view from above of both.

The basement pool is where generations of Pomona kids learned to swim.

Best. Cornerstone. Ever.

Not strictly speaking a historic detail, but this signs in a recreation room are wonderful. Unlike the Village People song, apparently you couldn’t “do whatever you feel.”

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