City of gracious book talks

Photo by Allison Evans

Last Wednesday evening I spoke at the Carnegie Building in Upland for what turned out to be one of my most successful events ever. There were 36 in the audience, according to one friend who counted. After speaking and reading for maybe 20 minutes, I took questions. And questions, and questions. Interesting, amusing, thoughtful questions, for a little more than an hour.

Usually, say at a service club talk, there’s only 20 or 30 minutes for questions, so to have a relatively open-ended discussion was rare. But even at that, no audience has ever had this many questions. There might have been a couple more if the librarian hadn’t wanted to wrap up. Because people seemed so interested, my answers tended to be full and reflective as I talked about books, writing, my journey to Ontario, council meetings and more.

One friend said afterward, “I’ve never seen an audience so engaged.” Thanks to everyone who turned out — including three Upland council members — for being there and being, sincerely, such a great audience. It was lucrative too: I sold 16 books.

Photo by Ann Lara

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Column: After 20 years of questions, finally, some answers

Friday marks 20 years for yours truly at the Daily Bulletin (huzzah!), and my column is about the milestone. Rather than reflect on two decades, I did something I’ve considered doing for a slow day for years: I compiled a FAQ about me and my job. Hope you find it of interest, and thanks for reading me for whatever portion of my 20 years you’ve followed by work. Even if it’s just since, say, Wednesday, it’s appreciated.

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A sippin’ David Allen

Checking Twitter this morning, I had a notification from a man in the Netherlands thanking me for participating in a whiskey tasting, where, as the photo above shows, I was “special guest.” (But of course.)

Evidently Frans Muthert looked for that David Allen on Twitter to get his handle to include in the tweet and didn’t notice he’d found a different, transcontinental fellow. As the guest’s apparent employer, Springbank Whisky (“The official Twitter account of Scotland’s oldest family owned distillery”) replied, “I don’t think ‘our’ David is on Twitter.”

He should sign up. Everyone’s talking about him!

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No cross words out of me

The Claremont Courier’s crossword puzzle of Feb. 3 was brought to my attention by the Courier’s editor due to the clue for 17 Across: “Longtime Claremont writer for the Inland Valley Daily Bulletin.” My name is the answer to a crossword puzzle? I’ve finally made it!

I doubt I’ve ever successfully worked a crossword to the end, but at least this time there’s one sure answer, and I felt comfortable filling it in in ink. (On a photocopy of the puzzle. The original must be kept minty-fresh.) How many Courier readers were stumped, I wonder?

Click on the image above if you’d like to try to work the puzzle yourself.

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Slow Sunday

My usual practice, as you may recall, is to not only avoid the Super Bowl but to get out and about during the game. Due to the chilly weather and press of things to do, inspiration was lacking, and my early thought of training in to LA was dropped.

But after a quiet hour at home tackling some paperwork clutter, a long-overdue and satisfying task, I ventured to Montclair to make a run to Target, which was relatively unpopulated, and then to Barnes and Noble, which seemed to have a normal amount of customers, although by that point the game may have been over, or ending. I’ll have to plan better next year.

If you skipped the (yawn) big game, what did you do?

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Column: His 2,400 CDs get another spin — over 10 years

cds

A few weeks ago I completed a personal project: to play all my compact discs again. It took 10 years. I write about that in Wednesday’s column. Above: half of my collection; another two bookcases stand on the other side of my stereo.

You might wonder after reading this column — you will read it, won’t you? — what happens next. For starters, all the CDs I’ve pulled have been saved atop my bookcases until my project was done. Now I can trade or sell them. Also, playing my CDs again will be something of a lifelong project, I think, in that I will continually have to pull more to trade/sell if I’m going to keep buying new ones, shelf space being finite. But I’m unlikely to start listening to them again from the beginning.

I didn’t have room to get into this either, but there’s the matter of whether some of these CDs that I’m keeping will ever be played again, and if not, was keeping them a futile act? That’s a tough one. What I can say is that since 2006, every CD I own has been played once. Can you say the same about yours?

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