Some food for thought on Fox’s big pitch.

Fox Sports WestWhile you were putting the finishing touches on Thanksgiving leftovers over the weekend, Deadline.com reported the particulars of Fox’s latest proposal to retain the Dodgers’ television rights: Between $6 and $7 billion over 25 years.

That seems like a strong pitch, indicative of the Dodgers’ place in Fox’s local programming slate with no Lakers, no NFL (and for the moment, no NHL either). For the Dodgers, it represents a significant increase over the reported $39 million Fox will pay for TV rights in 2013, the final year of the current contract. Yet it may not be enough to sway Dodgers co-owner Todd Boehly, whom Deadline reports is the lone negotiator for Guggenheim Baseball Management. The Dodgers could elect to start their own regional network, á la the Yankees or the Red Sox, but to do so means Guggenheim must turn down a profit margin of $4 billion-plus on the $2 billion it paid for the club earlier this year.

The exclusive negotiating window between Fox and the Dodgers closes in four days.

A few observations:

• Fox is attempting to launch a national sports network to challenge ESPN. Other than the money, the promise of greater national exposure would appear to be a cornerstone of any Fox pitch, something Time Warner or a team-owned regional network can’t offer.

• One thing a Dodgers regional network can offer that all other parties can’t: Far lower revenue-sharing obligations as part of a reported “secret deal” with MLB. This could be the kicker.

• An important question to be resolved: Would the Dodgers have the final say over Fox on hiring reporters and other Dodgers broadcast personnel – as seems to be the case with Time Warner Cable and the Lakers?

• Another question: How much does Vin Scully drive up the value of the Dodgers’ TV rights?

Facebook Twitter Plusone Digg Reddit Stumbleupon Tumblr Email
This entry was posted in JP on the Dodgers, Media and tagged by J.P. Hoornstra. Bookmark the permalink.

About J.P. Hoornstra

J.P. Hoornstra covers the Dodgers, Angels and Major League Baseball for the Los Angeles Daily News, Long Beach Press-Telegram, Torrance Daily Breeze, San Gabriel Valley Tribune, Pasadena Star-News, San Bernardino Sun, Inland Valley Daily Bulletin, Whittier Daily News and Redlands Daily Facts. Before taking the beat in 2012, J.P. covered the NHL for four years. UCLA gave him a degree once upon a time; when he graduated on schedule, he missed getting Arnold Schwarzenegger's autograph on his diploma by five months.