Dodgers announce paperless season-ticket program.

The Dodgers are “going green.”

The team announced Thursday it is introducing a paperless ticket program for season and mini-plan holders in 2014.

“Paperless tickets are part of our heightened efforts to enable Dodger fans to manage their season seats better than ever,” Dodgers President and CEO Stan Kasten said in a statement. “The benefits include: receiving your tickets sooner, being able to print them at home or at your office, the ease of transferring them to family, friends, business associates or clients with free forwarding, and the ability to use them via your smart phone to enter the stadium.”

In partnership with the Costa Mesa-based Tickets.com, the Dodgers are implementing an all-digital/mobile ticket delivery platform called “TDC ProVenue Ticketing.” According to the Dodgers, 17 Major League Baseball clubs already utilize the ProVenue platform.

According to the Dodgers, the platform will feature:

- Digital/mobile delivery to all customers
- A state-of-the-art customer interface, buying process and ticket management
- Integrated loyalty programs
- Interactive seat maps
- One system for window sales and back office use
- A highly configurable system with no limitations

Michael Young will retire rather than return to Dodgers.

Michael Young

Michael Young batted .314 in 21 regular-season games with the Dodgers, and collected one hit in 10 postseason at-bats. (Associated Press photo)

Veteran infielder Michael Young has decided to retire rather than return to the Dodgers, ending a 14-year major-league career.

The 37-year-old native of Covina was mulling a one-year offer to re-sign with the Dodgers. At a charity bowling function on Sunday in Anaheim, Young sounded eager to play his natural second base position in a utility role, but also acknowledged that family was his first priority. Young and his wife live in Dallas with their three children.

“I’m going through every possible option with my family,” he said Sunday. “I’m not going to hold out as long as possible.”

Young played most of his 1,970 career games with the Texas Rangers, whom he helped lead to the World Series in 2010 and 2011. Young was traded to the Philadelphia Phillies in December 2012, then to the Dodgers at the 2013 trade deadline.

He finishes his career with an even .300 batting average, 185 home runs and 1,030 RBIs.

Daily Distractions: California Superior Court judge tosses class-action lawsuit against Dodgers, Lakers, TWC.

SportsNet LA

The Dodgers’ new network, SportsNet LA, is launching Feb. 25. (Photo courtesy of SportsNet LA via Facebook)

A California Superior Court judge tossed out a class-action lawsuit filed against the Dodgers, Lakers, and Time Warner Cable on Tuesday, citing federal laws designed to protect the rights of cable providers. Judge Amy D. Hogue ruled that California’s Unfair Competition Law couldn’t be invoked to relieve Time Warner subscribers of the burden of unwanted fees or channels.

This blog space has focused on the Dodgers’ $8 billion, 25-year television contract to the extent that it impacts the team and its fans — the Time Warner subscribers who are bracing for a rate hike, and non-TWC subscribers who are being asked to “Demand Your Dodgers Now.” That makes sense. This is a Dodgers blog, after all.

But what about the non-Dodger (and non-Laker) fans who don’t want to pay for two channels they don’t plan to watch? That’s the group who filed the class-action suit. Their lead attorney, Max Blecher, summarized their position: “People should have the right to say ‘no.’ ”

Here’s how that position was eloquated in Judge Hogue’s nine-page ruling:

1. TWC plans to pass some the cost of its licensing deal with the Dodgers to its enhanced basic cable customers by increasing the cost of service by an estimated $4 to $5 per month. The Dodgers … knew and consented to the fact that the costs of the licensing agreement would be passed on to TWC enhanced basic cable customers without an opportunity for customers to opt-out of including those channels in their enhanced basic cable subscription.

2. TWC customers who subscribe to the enhanced basic cable package have no way of unsubscribìng from the costs of the Dodgers and Lakers networks, despite the fact that up to 60 percent of customers would do so if given the choice.

In response, TWC contended that the plaintiffs “entirely fail to address the ‘safe harbor effect’ of the CCA” — the federal law that allows cable providers to “bundle” channels in the same manner as SportsNet LA and TWC SportsNet (the Lakers’ network). The federal “safe harbor” law takes priority over California’s Unfair Competition Law. The judge agreed.

Blecher said he might file a notice of appeal if it can be argued that the judge’s ruling went too far. So this fight might not be over. The plaintiffs have at least one strong ally in Congress.

Some bullet points for a hump day:
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