Former Dodgers pitcher Bob Welch dies at age 57.

Bob Welch

Bob Welch pitched for the Dodgers from 1978-87. (Getty Images)

Former Dodgers pitcher Bob Welch has died after suffering a heart attack at his home last night, the Dodgers announced Tuesday. He was 57.

Welch pitched for the Dodgers from 1978-87, winning 115 games. He started game one of the National League Championship Series in 1978 and 1981, winning the first.

“The Los Angeles Dodgers are saddened to learn of the passing of Bob Welch,” Dodgers president and CEO Stan Kasten said in a statement released by the team. “He was one of the greatest competitors to wear the Dodger uniform. Dodger fans will always remember his confrontation with Yankee great Reggie Jackson in Game 2 of the 1978 World Series, when the 21-year-old rookie struck out Jackson to end the game.”

As a 21-year-old rookie, Welch was called on to close out game two of the 1978 World Series at Dodger Stadium. His final pitch ended a nine-pitch duel with Jackson to earn the save:



In game four of the series, Welch allowed a 10th-inning single to Lou Piniella that scored Roy White with the game-winning run.

As the starting pitcher in game four of the 1981 World Series, Welch suffered the ignominy of facing four batters without recording an out at Dodger Stadium. The Dodgers came back to win that game and eventually the series in six games.

Among all Los Angeles Dodgers pitchers, Welch ranks eighth in wins, seventh in strikeouts (1,292), sixth in losses (86), tenth in complete games (47) and seventh in shutouts (23). Welch ended his career with the Oakland A’s from 1988-1994, winning game three of the 1988 World Series in Oakland. No pitcher has won more than 25 games since Welch won 27 for the A’s in 1990.

Welch is survived by his children Dylan, Riley and Kelly.

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About J.P. Hoornstra

J.P. Hoornstra covers the Dodgers, Angels and Major League Baseball for the Los Angeles Daily News, Long Beach Press-Telegram, Torrance Daily Breeze, San Gabriel Valley Tribune, Pasadena Star-News, San Bernardino Sun, Inland Valley Daily Bulletin, Whittier Daily News and Redlands Daily Facts. Before taking the beat in 2012, J.P. covered the NHL for four years. UCLA gave him a degree once upon a time; when he graduated on schedule, he missed getting Arnold Schwarzenegger's autograph on his diploma by five months.