Clayton Kershaw named National League Player of the Week.

Clayton Kershaw

Clayton Kershaw pauses before throwing the final pitch of his no-hitter Wednesday night at Dodger Stadium. (John McCoy/Staff photographer)

Clayton Kershaw was named National League player of the week for the week ending Sunday. Kershaw threw his first career no-hitter on Wednesday against the Colorado Rockies (PHOTOS | STORY)

According to the Elias Sports Bureau, his 15 strikeouts were the most in Major League history by a pitcher that did not allow a runner to reach base via hit, walk or hit-by-pitch. The previous mark of 14 strikeouts in such a performance was shared by Nap Rucker (September 5, 1908), Sandy Koufax (September 9, 1965) and Matt Cain (June 13, 2012). In addition, the 15 strikeouts were tied for third-most overall in a no-hitter, and tied for the most by a left-hander, matching Hall of Famer Warren Spahn (15 on September 16, 1960). Kershaw’s performance was the 22nd no-hitter in Dodger franchise history, which is the most by any Major League club. It came just 24 days after his teammate Josh Beckett threw his first career no-hitter (May 25 vs. PHI), marking the shortest span between no-hitters by a team since Cincinnati’s Johnny Vander Meer did it in consecutive starts on June 11 and 15, 1938 (Elias Sports Bureau).

For the season, Kershaw is 7-2 with a 2.52 ERA.

This is his fourth career Player of the Week honor. He previously won the award April 1-7, 2013; May 14-20, 2012; and June 20-26, 2011.

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About J.P. Hoornstra

J.P. Hoornstra covers the Dodgers, Angels and Major League Baseball for the Los Angeles Daily News, Long Beach Press-Telegram, Torrance Daily Breeze, San Gabriel Valley Tribune, Pasadena Star-News, San Bernardino Sun, Inland Valley Daily Bulletin, Whittier Daily News and Redlands Daily Facts. Before taking the beat in 2012, J.P. covered the NHL for four years. UCLA gave him a degree once upon a time; when he graduated on schedule, he missed getting Arnold Schwarzenegger's autograph on his diploma by five months.