Miguel Olivo joins the Dodgers, TIm Federowicz optioned to Triple-A as Dodgers shuffle catchers.

Miguel Olivo

Miguel Olivo is a veteran of 1,116 major-league games, but none since June of last year. (Getty Images)

The Dodgers have had some wiggle room with their roster for at least a couple weeks now. From the time Chad Billingsley exited his first (and still only) rehabilitation start on April 6, it’s been less and less likely that the right-hander would return within the first two months of the season.

Wednesday, the Dodgers formally acknowledged that fact. Billingsley was transfered to the 60-day disabled list and the Dodgers selected the contract of catcher Miguel Olivo to the 40-man roster.

Rather than continue to stash Olivo in Triple-A Albuquerque, where he’s batting .390 with four home runs and 18 RBIs in 15 games, the Dodgers recalled Olivo and optioned catcher Tim Federowicz to Albuquerque for the second time this season.

Olivo, 35, hasn’t appeared in a major-league game since June of last year with the Miami Marlins. He showed well in spring training, batting .263 (5 for 19) in nine games as a non-roster invitee on a minor-league contract. When he was returned to the minors, Olivo requested his release.

Ultimately Olivo bid his time at Triple-A and was rewarded for his patience.

Federowicz was batting .109 (5 for 46) with two doubles in 13 games. Neither he nor Drew Butera (.190) provided much offense in the absence of starter A.J. Ellis, but Butera is out of options.

Ellis, who underwent arthroscopic surgery on his left knee April 7, is expected back in mid-May.

Dodgers pitcher Chad Billingsley has platelet rich plasma injection.

Chad Billingsley

Dodgers pitcher Chad Billingsley allowed one run in 1 1/3 innings in a rehab start for Single-A Rancho Cucamonga on April 6. (Associated Press photo)

Dodgers pitcher Chad Billingsley received a platelet-rich plasma injection in his right elbow Wednesday morning, designed to help expedite healing following a diagnosis of tendinitis. He’s been shut down from throwing for 5 to 7 days.

Tomorrow will be one year to the day since Billingsley underwent Tommy John surgery. The 29-year-old right-hander made great strides through spring training without any setbacks and started a rehab game April 6 for Single-A Rancho Cucamonga. However, Billingsley lasted just 1 ⅓ innings in the game before the scar tissue in his elbow snapped.

Billingsley said his last bullpen session, seven days ago in San Francisco, went well.

“It was improving, starting to feel better,” he said. “This is icing.”

Billingsley said the tendinitis was an expected part of the rehab process.

“The way (Dodgers team physician Dr. Neal ElAttrache) explained it, it’s just stretching out,” the pitcher said.

It’s possible that Billingsley will accompany the Dodgers on their next road trip, a nine-day journey through Minneapolis, Miami and Washington D.C. beginning next Tuesday.

Chad Billingsley’s right elbow is ‘doing well’ after scare at Rancho Cucamonga.

Chad Billingsley

Dodgers pitcher Chad Billingsley allowed one run in 1 1/3 innings Sunday for Single-A Rancho Cucamonga. (Associated Press photo)

Chad Billingsley threw a curveball Sunday and heard — and felt — a crack in his right elbow.

“When you crack your back or your neck, that’s kind of what it felt like,” he said.

Billingsley motioned for a trainer and left the game immediately. He was supposed to throw two innings in his first rehabilitation start for Single-A Rancho Cucamonga and fell two outs short of the goal.

The 29-year-old pitcher, who is recovering from Tommy John surgery on his right elbow last April, was worried. “I threw a curveball and thought ‘oh my God.’”

After meeting with team physician Dr. Neal ElAttrache, Billingsley was reassured that the sensation was caused by scar tissue breaking up, a normal part of the recovery process. The doctor didn’t even send Billingsley in for an MRI exam.

Tuesday, Billingsley was back in the Dodgers clubhouse. He still hasn’t been cleared for his next bullpen session or rehab start but doesn’t think it will be long.

“It’s actually doing well right now,” Billingsley said. “It feels like normal second-day soreness.”

The original schedule called for Billingsley to make five rehab starts. That hasn’t changed, but a potential return in early May is on hold for now.

“Whenever he gives me the OK, I’ll start back up,” he said.