Dodgers prospect Corey Seager named to Arizona Fall League ‘Fall Stars’ game.

Corey Seager is the Dodgers’ lone representative on the Arizona Fall League’s “Fall Stars” roster. Seager, who’s slashing .255/.345/.412 for the Glendale Desert Dogs, will represent the West team.

The game will be played this Saturday (Nov. 1) at 5 p.m. PT at Salt River Fields in Scottsdale, Arizona. MLB Network will televise the game, which will also be streamed online at MLB.com.

Scouting and farm directors from every Major League organization, in consultation with Arizona Fall League Director Steve Cobb and his baseball personnel staff, selected the players for the annual showcase that pits top prospects from the Fall League’s East Division and West Division clubs.

Each Major League organization is offered the opportunity to be represented by at least one player.

Watch: Dodgers prospect Corey Seager discusses his 2014 season.

Dodgers prospect Corey Seager, who was named the club’s Branch Rickey co-Minor League Player of the Year on Friday, visited Dodger Stadium and discussed some of the ups and downs of his 2014 season:

Seager added that he won’t be playing Winter League Baseball once his time in the Arizona Fall League is up.

More on the 20-year-old shortstop in tomorrow’s editions.

Julio Urias, Corey Seager, Joc Pederson named minor league pitcher/players of the year.

Joc Pederson

Joc Pederson hit 33 home runs and stole 30 bases for Triple-A Albuquerque this season. (Getty Images)

The Dodgers chose Julio Urias, 18, as their Branch Rickey Minor League Pitcher of the Year on Friday. Infielder Corey Seager and outfielder Joc Pederson were chosen as co-Minor League Players of the Year.

The three players, widely regarded as the top three prospects in the organization, will all be at Dodger Stadium to be honored in a pregame ceremony tonight. Pederson will be in uniform because he was promoted to the Dodgers’ 40-man roster on Sept. 1.

Urias had been taking part in the Arizona Instructional League. The 18-year-old left-hander spent the entire season with Single-A Rancho Cucamonga and went 2-2 with a 2.36 ERA in 25 games (20 starts), and a 1.20 ERA (6 ER/45.0 IP) in 12 games (10 starts) after the All-Star break.

Seager, who turned 20 on April 27, was selected to Baseball America’s Minor League All-Star Team, batting a combined .349 with a minor league-best 50 doubles, five triples, 20 homers, the second-most extra-base hits in the minors (75) and 97 RBI in 118 games with Single-A Rancho Cucamonga and Double-A Chattanooga in his third professional season.

Pederson, 22, was also the Dodgers’ minor league player of the year in 2012. In his first full season at Triple-A, he produced the fourth 30-home run/30-stolen base campaign in Pacific Coast League history.

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BaseballAmerica.com ranks Corey Seager as its number-one minor league MVP.

Corey Seager

Dodgers prospect Corey Seager was promoted to Double-A by the Dodgers after his apperance in the Futures Game. (Jennifer Cappuccio Maher/Staff photographer)

This one’s a bit esoteric, but try to follow along.

BaseballAmerica.com, which pays closer attention to minor-league prospects than just about any website on the planet, ranked the MVPs of each minor league, as chosen by the voters in each league. The criterion for ranking: long-term potential.

Corey Seager topped the list. The 20-year-old shortstop was chosen MVP of the California League, despite not playing in the California League for half the season. (He was promoted to Double-A after the Futures Game.)

From author Matt Eddy:
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Season ends for Double-A Chattanooga in Southern League Championship Series.

The Chattanooga Lookouts, the Dodgers’ Double-A affiliate, lost game three of the Southern League Championship Series to the Jacksonville Suns, ending their season.

Shortstop prospect Corey Seager went 0 for 4 with two strikeouts.

Left-handed pitcher Onelki Garcia, who’s on the major-league 60-day disabled list, was charged with two runs in a relief appearance. He allowed two hits and walked a batter while recording two outs.

Corey Seager homers as Double-A Chattanooga Lookouts drop game one.

Corey Seager

Dodgers prospect Corey Seager hit a home run in game one of the Southern League Championship Series on Wednesday. (Staff photo)

The Chattanooga Lookouts, the Dodgers’ Double-A affiliate, lost game one of the Southern League Championship Series to the Jacksonville Suns on Wednesday, 5-3.

Chattanooga was led by Dodgers prospect Corey Seager. The 20-year-old shortstop went 2 for 4 with a two-run home run against right-hander Jose Urena, the No. 9 prospect in the Marlins’ organization.

Onelki Garcia continued his longshot bid to join the Dodgers later this month by pitching a scoreless inning of relief. The left-hander allowed a single and struck out one batter in the third inning.

Double-A Chattanooga wins, Jose Dominguez makes third rehab appearance.

The Chattanooga Lookouts, the Dodgers’ Double-A affiliate, extended their season with a 7-6 win against Huntsville on Monday. They will face Jacksonville in the Southern League Finals, a best-of-5 series.

Jose Dominguez made his third rehab appearance since he was sidelined with inflammation in his right shoulder July 25. He faced three batters, walked one and allowed two singles. All three runners scored, which turned a lopsided 7-2 contest into a close game.

Dominguez also allowed one run in both of his rehab appearances with Rookie-advanced Ogden.

Dodgers shortstop prospect Corey Seager drove in one of the Lookouts’ runs with an RBI single and is batting .176 in the series.

Corey Seager and Julio Urias appear in the Futures Game; Seager nearing promotion.

Corey Seager

Dodgers prospect Corey Seager is expected to be promoted to Double-A by the Dodgers after his apperance in the Futures Game today. (Jennifer Cappuccio Maher/Staff photographer)


Dodgers prospects Corey Seager and Julio Urias left an impression at the annual Futures Game at Minneapolis’ Target Field on Sunday.

At least one of them won’t be in Single-A much longer.

The 17-year-old Urias became the youngest player to appear in the Futures Game when he pitched the fifth inning for the World team. Urias pitched a scoreless inning, throwing 14 pitches and striking out one batter. His fastball was clocked as fast as 95 mph, according to MLB’s official speed-tracking software, and 97 according to the in-house radar gun.

Seager lined out to end the first inning and was hit by a pitch in his back, but remained in the game, in his only two plate appearances.

Multiple sources confirmed a report Sunday that Seager will be promoted to Double-A Chattanooga after the game.

The Dodgers haven’t made an official announcement, though Seager’s name had been removed from Single-A Rancho Cucamonga’s online roster by Sunday afternoon. He wasn’t on Chattanooga’s roster yet, either.

Seager, 20, is ranked among the top 30 prospects in baseball by Baseball America, Baseball Prospectus and MLB.com. He batted .352 with 18 home runs, 70 RBIs and a California League-leading .633 slugging percentage with Rancho Cucamonga.
The Futures Game is showcase game for the top-rated minor-league prospects. The Home Run Derby will be played in Minneapolis tomorrow and the All-Star game will be played there Tuesday.

Daily Distractions: April Dodger Pride award winners include a couple top prospects.

Corey Seager

Shortstop Corey Seager had a strong month of April at Single-A Rancho Cucamonga (Staff photo)

The end of the month is always a good time to check in on the Dodgers’ farm system, because a good month comes with an award.

The Dodger Pride Awards were created in 2008 by GM Ned Colletti to reward one pitcher and one position player at each level of the system “who play the game with a hustling, smart, aggressive style.” The players and staff on each respective club vote for the monthly awards.

Your April winners:

Albuquerque (AAA)

Pitcher: Henry Sosa posted a 1-0 record with a 2.61 ERA (9 ER/31.0 IP) in April, striking out 21 batters against seven walks in five starts. The right-hander held opposing batters to a .233 batting average (27-for-116), while allowing only one home run in the month. The 12-year professional, who made 10 starts for the Houston Astros in 2011, was signed by the Dodgers as a free agent on December 13, 2013.

Player: Joc Pederson finished April among the Pacific Coast League leaders in several offensive categories including batting average (.398, 2nd), runs (22, T-3rd), hits (39, 1st), home runs (6, T-3rd), and stolen bases (9, T-2nd). On the year, the left-handed hitting outfielder is batting .368 (50-for-136) with 11 home runs and 22 RBI, including a .418 batting average (38-for-91) against right-handed pitching. Through 36 games this season, Pederson has also tallied 15 multi-hit games, including six performances with three or more hits. He entered 2014 as the Dodgers’ No. 1 prospect according to Baseball America.  

Chattanooga (AA)

Pitcher: Tyson Brummett went 2-1 and allowed only one run in 23.0 innings spanning four April starts, leading the Southern League in ERA (0.39) and ranking sixth in opponents’ batting average (.181). On the season, the former UCLA pitcher is 3-3 with a 0.83 ERA (4 ER/43.1 IP) and has allowed one run or less in six of his seven starts for the Lookouts. With runners in scoring position this season, the right-hander has allowed only four hits (4-for-36), good for a .111 batting average. Brummett signed with the Dodgers as a free agent on February 20, 2014, after being drafted by the Phillies in the seventh round of the 2007 First-Year Player Draft.

Player: Scott Schebler drove in 16 runs (T-7th, Southern League) and clubbed five homers (T-2nd, Southern League) in 25 April games. The Iowa native had a .258 batting average with six homers, four triples and 21 RBI, and has excelled in clutch situations, batting .300 (9-for-30) with runners in scoring position. The 23-year-old, a 26th-round draft pick in 2010, was the Dodgers’ 2013 Branch Rickey Minor League Player of the Year after batting .296 in 125 games for Single-A Rancho Cucamonga last season.

Rancho Cucamonga (High-A)

Pitcher: Matt Shelton went 1-1 in April with a 1.76 ERA (3 ER/15.1 IP) in eight appearances for the Quakes, limiting opponents to a .228 batting average (13-for-57) and pitching scoreless relief in seven of his eight outings. The Texas native struck out 14 batters and walked only one in April before being promoted to Chattanooga on May 1. The 25-year-old was selected in the 24th round of the 2011 draft.

Player: Corey Seager batted .294 (25-for-85) in April with 10 extra-base hits, while tallying 13 RBI in 20 games. The 20-year-old has raised his average to .333 (40-for-120) with two homers, 11 doubles, two triples and 15 RBI, batting .429 (15-for-35) with a .512 on-base percentage in nine May games. Seager entered 2014 as the Dodgers’ second-best prospect according to Baseball America.

Great Lakes (Low-A)

Pitcher: Michael Johnson posted a 1-1 record with a 1.35 ERA (2 ER/13.1 IP) and a save in eight April appearances. The right-handed reliever limited opposing hitters to a .200 batting average (10-for-50) with 19 strikeouts and five walks. On the season, the Massachusetts native has a 1.47 ERA (3 ER/18.1 IP) and 22 strikeouts in 11 appearances for the Loons. The 23-year-old, a 14th-round pick in the 2013 draft, led the Ivy League with seven wins as a senior at Dartmouth College in 2012.

PlayerJoey Curletta had a terrific April, finishing among the Midwest League leaders in batting average (.368, 2nd), runs (18, T-3rd), hits (39, 1st), doubles (9, T-3rd) and RBI (15, T-6th) in 25 games for Great Lakes. Overall, Curletta has posted a .356 batting average (52-for-146) in 35 games, second among Midwest League hitters, and has seven three-hit performances for Great Lakes. The Arizona native was selected by the Dodgers in the sixth round of the 2012 draft.

Some bullet points for a Frog Jumping Day:

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Daily Distractions: On close calls on the basepaths, has Yasiel Puig run out of luck?

Yasiel Puig

Yasiel Puig has been thrown out on the bases seven times this season. (Getty Images)

The Dodgers have seen 15 runners thrown out on the basepaths this season. That’s two fewer than the Colorado Rockies and St. Louis Cardinals in a statistical category that no team wants to lead.

Yasiel Puig is single-handedly responsible for seven of those misfortunes, tied with Pittsburgh’s Starling Marte for the MLB lead. Puig was doubled off first base in the first game of Thursday’s doubleheader in Minnesota. Umpire Tim Welke had a good look at the play from his vantage point at second base. Welke had an even better look at this play in the night game (from Yahoo.com):

With one out, Puig beat out a chopper up the middle that second baseman Brian Dozier threw in the dirt to first base. Chris Colabello couldn’t pick it and the ball hopped past him, with catcher Yosmil Pinto backing up the play. After he ran through the bag, Puig sharply turned his head to the right to check for the ball’s location. It was evident from Puig’s body language that Puig wanted to take an extra base, but when he saw Pinto with the ball, he applied the brakes. If Puig’s left shoulder began to dip toward second, the rest of his body actually leaned right. He never left the baseline, never crossed the foul line. He stopped, turned around clockwise (that’s away from second base), and started walking back to the bag like an innocent man who just had hit an infield single.

When Pinto tagged Puig, Welke signaled that Puig was out. Was that the right call? Judge for yourself.

The Yahoo! article suggested that Welke “seemed to be looking for a reason to call Puig out.” Without interviewing Welke, a veteran of 29 major-league seasons and the crew chief last night, it’s impossible to know that for sure.

Psychology tells us that there might have been a very real phenomenon at work. It’s called the confirmation bias and we’re all susceptible to it at some point, on some level. Reading further into the well-sourced Wikipedia entry on the topic, “even if people gather and interpret evidence in a neutral manner, they may still remember it selectively to reinforce their expectations.”

A player who’s already been thrown out on the basepaths six times in a month (Puig) can be reasonably expected to make the same mistake again. Puig’s mistake in the first game might have reinforced that expectation for everyone in the ballpark, including the second-base umpire. Given a split second to make his call at first base in the second game, Welke could easily have fallen prey to confirmation bias. That’s not an opinion — that’s a real possibility, reinforced repeatedly in scientifically valid experiments. Welke might not have been aware of a possible confirmation bias at work in his own mind. Even if reporters were given the chance to interview him after the game, the interview might not have cleared up the question.

Here’s what we do know: The more outs he runs into, the more Puig hurts his chances of getting the benefit of the doubt in situations like the one Thursday night in Minnesota.

Thursday was still a good day for Puig on the whole. The Elias Sports Bureau (via ESPN) said that Puig is the first Dodgers player to reach base eight times in a doubleheader since Bill Buckner against the Giants in 1976.

Some bullet points for a Baby Day:
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