Padres unite Ian Kennedy, Carlos Quentin in trade with Diamondbacks.

The Dodgers haven’t completed any trades this morning, and don’t appear to be close on any either. They have had some interest in making trades within their division, but that’s a difficult proposition. Especially when you’re in first place, the rest of the division trying to knock you off your perch.

That didn’t stop the Arizona Diamondbacks and San Diego Padres from pulling off a rare intradivision swap Wednesday morning. The Padres receive starting pitcher Ian Kennedy, while the Diamondbacks receive relief pitcher Joe Thatcher, minor-leaguer Matt Stites and a draft pick.

The trade unites Kennedy and outfielder Carlos Quentin in San Diego, the two players responsible for inciting benches-clearing brawls with the Dodgers this season.

Postgame thoughts: San Diego 7, Dodgers 2.

Matt Kemp Don Mattingly

Matt Kemp was benched to start Wednesday’s game yet still came to bat with a total of six runners on base against the San Diego Padres. He drove in one. (Keith Birmingham/Pasadena Star-News)

“We had 10 hits today?” Adrian Gonzalez asked in an otherwise silent Dodgers clubhouse.

Yes.

“Same old story,” he said.

The Dodgers are no mystery after 15 games. They are putting runners on base (their .337 on-base percentage is fourth in the National League) but not driving them in (their 39 runs scored are second-fewest in the NL, ahead of only the Miami Marlins). They’ve won seven games because their pitching staff is generally excellent. When it’s not excellent, as was the case Wednesday with Clayton Kershaw, they’re in trouble.

Maybe one person at the ballpark knew the Dodgers were in trouble from the outset Wednesday, and that was Kershaw himself.

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Dodgers pitcher Zack Greinke is trying to learn from his mistakes — three of them, to be exact.

Zack Greinke Carlos Quentin

Dodgers pitcher Zack Greinke said he’s watched replays of last Thurdsay’s brawl in San Diego. (Associated Press)

Say this much for Dodgers pitcher Zack Greinke: He’s trying to learn from his mistakes.

Mistake one: October 11, 2011. On the eve of the National League Championship Series between Greinke’s Brewers and the St. Louis Cardinals, Greinke was asked about Cardinals right-hander Chris Carpenter.

“They think his presence, his attitude out there sometimes is like a phony attitude,” Greinke told reporters in Milwaukee. “And then he yells at people. He just stares people down and stuff. And most pitchers just don’t do that. And when guys do, I guess some hitters get mad. Some hitters do it to pitchers. But when you do that some people will get mad.

“There’s other pitchers in the league that do it, but, I don’t know,” Greinke said, “a lot of guys on our team don’t like Carpenter.”

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Dodgers center fielder Matt Kemp gets his first day off of 2013, and he doesn’t like it.

Matt Kemp“I don’t like days off,” Matt Kemp said as he bounded up the dugout steps before his first off-day of 2013, on his way to take batting practice for the second time Wednesday.

The last time he took a day off was Sept. 9, 2012. Kemp was nursing a then-undisclosed torn labrum in his left shoulder. This time, the problems aren’t physical. Kemp is batting .185 with no home runs and just four RBIs through the season’s first 14 games.

“Just body language, more than anything,” Dodgers manager Don Mattingly said. “Being around the game, you see guys struggle. Sometimes it helps to sit back and watch a game where you don’t have to be out there. … It gives him another day tomorrow, almost three days with the night game (Friday) in Baltimore. I wanted to give him 10 to 12 days off over the course of 162 anyway.”

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Daily Distractions: Will a day off cure what ails the Dodgers’ Matt Kemp?

Matt Kemp gameday view

(courtesy of MLB.com)

By the looks of things, the Dodgers ought to worry less about Matt Kemp‘s mechanics at the plate than what’s going on inside his head.

That image, courtesy of MLB.com’s Gameday tool, shows Kemp’s final at-bat Tuesday against Jason Marquis. Appropriate to the picture, the bat did not leave his shoulders. Kemp took an 83-mph slider, an 88-mph sinker, and an 82-mph changeup for strikes, ending the sixth inning with a whimper.

I didn’t have a chance to speak to Kemp after the game, but Kemp typically isn’t introspective in the midst of a slump. Most hitters aren’t; if they could explain why they were slumping, they would be hitting the ball better. Based on that sixth-inning at-bat, it would be tempting to pin Kemp’s problem on poor pitch selection. It might not be that simple.

Here’s how Marquis struck out Kemp to end the third inning:

Matt  Kemp

In this at-bat, Kemp’s pitch selection is pretty good. He took two pitches low and out of the zone with two strikes (#3 and #4), then swung a pitch (#5) that might have been a strike — it was about an inch higher than the pitch before. Yet Kemp missed. You have to wonder what he was thinking on the second pitch of this at-bat, a swing-and-miss on a slider over the fattest part of the plate.

Kemp saw two sinkers from Marquis in his first at-bat. The pitch chart isn’t integral here — Kemp took a ball 10 inches off the plate then flew out to right field on the second pitch, which was in the strike zone. Both pitches were sinkers.

By the time the sixth inning rolled around, Kemp should have figured he wasn’t getting any fastballs from Marquis. Yet he took three breaking balls in the strike zone without swinging the bat.

Don Mattingly said after the game that he’s considering giving Kemp a day off, even though the Dodgers have an off-day Thursday. The manager seems to believe Kemp’s slump (he’s hitting .185) begins and ends between his ears.

“Matt’s pressing pretty good,” Mattingly said. “Tonight he seemed really frustrated. The game didn’t help. It’s one of those games that you jump behind early, nothing kind of seems to go your way, and he seemed to be — obviously it didn’t go very good for him.”

From struggling superstars to …

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Despite appealing suspension, San Diego Padres’ Carlos Quentin might miss Dodgers series.

Major League Baseball is expediting Carlos Quentin’s appeal of his eight-game suspension and could rule on the matter today, according a report on the U-T San Diego website.

Writes Padres beat writer Bill Center:

If the appeal process isn’t completed there is also a strong chance that the left fielder will drop the appeal and begin his suspension Monday.

“Major League Baseball is very aware of the situation,” a source in the league office said Saturday. “I think everyone would like to see a little time between the incident and Quentin’s next appearance at Dodger Stadium.”

The Padres visit the Dodgers for three games beginning tomorrow.

Update (11:30 a.m.): Quentin is not in the Padres’ lineup today, will drop his appeal and begin the eight-game suspension immediately. That means he won’t play in the series at Dodger Stadium. The Padres’ next series in Los Angeles is June 3-5.

Dodgers pitcher Zack Greinke broke his left collarbone in a benches-clearing brawl when Quentin charged the mound and tackled Greinke to the ground Thursday night at Petco Park. Greinke is expected to miss the next two months after undergoing successful surgery Saturday. Jerry Hairston Jr. was also suspended one game and fined for his role in the brawl, and has appealed the ruling with MLB.

MLB suspends Padres’ Carlos Quentin eight games, Dodgers’ Jerry Hairston Jr. one; both appeal.

Carlos Quentin has been suspended eight games, and Jerry Hairston Jr. one, for their roles in Thursday’s benches-clearing brawl in San Diego.

Both players have appealed their suspensions and will continue to play until the league issues its decision on the appeal. That means that Hairston and Quentin could be in the lineup Monday, when the Dodgers host the Padres at Dodger Stadium.

Quentin and Hairston were both fined an undisclosed amount.

Matt Kemp and Zack Greinke avoided supplemental discipline for their roles in the melee. Both were ejected, along with Hairston and Quentin, who began the brawl by charging Greinke after being hit by a pitch in the sixth inning. (Video here).

Dodgers’ Zack Greinke will have surgery tomorrow, expected to miss eight weeks.

ZackxGreinkeThursday’s brawl in San Diego will cost Dodgers pitcher Zack Greinke eight weeks on the disabled list because of a broken left clavicle.

Greinke was examined by team Dr. Neal ElAttrache today in Los Angeles and underwent a CT scan on his left clavicle. It was determined that he should undergo surgery to place a rod in the clavicle to stabilize and align the fracture.  The surgery will be performed tomorrow by ElAttrache and team Dr. John Itamura at White Memorial Hospital in Los Angeles.

Greinke suffered the injury Thursday night in San Diego when the Padres’ Carlos Quentin charged Greinke after being hit by a pitch in the sixth inning.

Quentin hasn’t been suspended by Major League Baseball for now and is in the Padres’ lineup tonight against the Colorado Rockies in San Diego.

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Dodgers pitcher Zack Greinke fractures clavicle in brawl with San Diego Padres.

When the Dodgers retained a surplus of starting pitchers in anticipation that their top five would not make every start this season, they could not have imagined a scenario like the one that unfolded Thursday night.

Zack Greinke left his start against the San Diego Padres after fracturing his left clavicle in the midst of a benches-clearing brawl that started when the Padres’ Carlos Quentin charged the mound after being hit by a Greinke pitch in the sixth inning.

Here’s the video of the brawl from tonight’s broadcast:

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Eric Stults vs. Chad Billingsley presents an intriguing Padres-Dodgers pitching matchup.

Chad Billingsley

It wasn’t that long ago that San Diego Padres left-hander Eric Stults started against his former team. On Sept. 4 of last year, Stults limited the Dodgers to seven hits and one run in six innings at Dodger Stadium. The Dodgers wound up losing that game 6-3 in 11 innings when John Ely imploded (the first time) in his first major-league game of the season.

Afterward Dodgers manager Don Mattingly said he’d seen enough soft-tossing left-handers for a season. “We’re kind of seeing the same guy and not making enough adjustments,” he said. Turns out that the Dodgers weren’t alone in their misery facing Stults, who went 3-1 over his final four starts of last year, including two wins over the eventual World Series champion San Francisco Giants. Stults shut out the Mets for five innings to win his only start of 2013. For a guy who was relegated to Japan after being cut by the Dodgers in 2009, it’s a nice little comeback.

Stults will be opposed by Chad Billingsley, who was officially activated from the 15-day disabled list prior to the game. Interesting to note that both pitchers broke into the majors with the Dodgers in the same year (2006). Billingsley would start 100 games over the next four seasons for the Dodgers. Stults started 24 during that same span before the teams parted ways.

Don’t forget, the game will not be on Prime Ticket tonight but you can still watch it on local cable.

Here are tonight’s full lineups:

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