Dodgers pitcher Carlos Frias suffers historically bad start.

DENVER >> Dodgers pitcher Carlos Frias became the first pitcher in the modern era to allow 10 hits while getting less than three outs Wednesday. The Dodgers are trailing the Colorado Rockies 9-0 in the third inning.

Frias, starting in place of injured left-hander Hyun-Jin Ryu, allowed 10 hits and six runs in two-thirds of an inning before he was relieved by Scott Elbert.

Prior to the game, Dodgers manager Don Mattingly complimented Frias’ willingness to attack the strike zone.

“He’s not afraid to go out there and throw it over,” Mattingly said. “Early on he gave up a couple homers. He went right back out there and was still on the attack. He doesn’t seem to be afraid at all. He tends to be fearless.”

Frias did not walk a batter.

Other than that, he did exactly the opposite of what the manager was looking for:

Frias threw 38 pitches. All were four-seam fastballs or cut fastballs.

The Rockies had never scored eight runs in the first inning of a game in their 22-year history.

Rockies 10, Dodgers 4: Today’s game story.

Hanley Ramirez

Hanley Ramirez was scratched from the starting lineup with an elbow injury and struck out as a pinch hitter in his only at-bat Tuesday. (Getty Images)

Don Mattingly offered an interesting take on his club prior to a 10-4 loss to the Rockies. The box score is here.

Also, Daniel Coulombe is the Dodgers’ all-time ERA leader.

Dodgers 11, Colorado Rockies 3: Today’s game story.

Matt Kemp

Matt Kemp points to the sky after hitting his 21st home run of the season Monday against the Colorado Rockies. (Getty Images)

DENVER >> The Dodgers won. Matt Kemp and Yasiel Puig had a little kerfuffle. Carl Crawford hurt his hamstring. Read all about that here.

Two things I want to emphasize that might not be clear on the surface:

1. Crawford wasn’t removed for precautionary reasons tonight. As he explained in my story, he was in genuine pain.

2. It’s really difficult to know what to make of the Puig-Kemp thing. Could be something, could be nothing. Could be something that happens all the time between closed doors, could be something that never happened before today. Again, we don’t really know. The truth is probably somewhere in between; if it was nothing it wouldn’t have gotten caught on camera and Don Mattingly wouldn’t have been nervously laughing and sipping water after the game:

That’s not good however you paint it, but it’s not enough to draw broad brushstrokes about the Dodgers’ team chemistry. It’s two emotionally charged teammates who didn’t see eye-to-eye in Game 150. Maybe it lingers, maybe it doesn’t. We’ll see.