Sandy Koufax perfect game ball, Jackie Robinson bat, Roy Campanella ring highlight all-star auction.

Jackie Robinson bat

A baseball used by Sandy Koufax to throw his perfect game on Sept. 9, 1965, a Jackie Robinson bat from 1953, and Roy Campanella’s Hall of Fame induction ring are among the items being auctioned at the All-Star fan fest next week in Minneapolis, Minnesota.

The Koufax ball was donated by former major league player and manager Jeff Torborg, who caught the game.

Hunt Auctions has pictures and a full description of the Koufax baseball, the Robinson bat and the Campanella ring.

Bids can be placed online or by telephone (610-524-0822). Bidding for the live auction begins Tuesday, July 15 at 10 a.m. at the Minneapolis Convention Center.

Coincidentally, the three players were the first to have their numbers retired by the Dodgers.

Newly digitized film shows Jackie Robinson, Duke Snider, Pee Wee Reese, Roy Campanella in spring training.

Jackie Robinson

Jackie Robinson slides into a practice sliding pit during spring training in 1951. (Still image from historicdodgertown.com).

Full-color video of the 1951 Dodgers in spring training — including Jackie Robinson, Duke Snider, Pee Wee Reese and Roy Campanella — is now available online at historicdodgertown.com.

Highlights of the never-before-seen silent film show the training regimen of the Dodgers at Dodgertown. Included in the footage are Hall of Famers Jackie Robinson, Pee Wee Reese, Roy Campanella and Duke Snider. Aerial footage showcases the baseball fields, while the barracks used to house nearly 600 major and minor league players are also shown.

The players are seen training on the site that still exists for multiple sports activities. Robinson, who broke Major League Baseball’s color barrier in 1947, takes swings at field two, slides in the sawdust-filled sliding pit and practices double plays with partner Reese at shortstop. Campanella is shown during batting practice at field two. Pitcher Don Newcombe is also shown doing calisthenics at Field No. 2.

The video was acquired by Gus Steiger, a sports writer for the Brooklyn Times, the New York Morning World, the New York Journal-American, and for more than 30 years the New York Daily Mirror. His granddaughter recently transferred the film to digital format.

“We are pleased to share this rare footage in tribute to longtime New York sportswriter Gus Steiger, who had this original film and passed it along to his son, Joel,” said Peter O’Malley, Historic Dodgertown chairman. “I knew Gus and he had the respect of everyone in the Dodger organization.”

Joel Steiger, featured in the film as a boy exploring Dodgertown, said, “The original film is edited to four and a half minutes. Our family is happy that it is available for Dodger fans everywhere. I was fortunate to travel to Dodgertown as a boy on several occasions and visit this historic place. I have many great memories of it and the people there.”

A three-headed salute.

Jackie Robinson statue

What has three heads, six blue stirrups and always smiles?

Find out for yourself on April 15, when the Dodgers give away a Jackie Robinson, Don Newcombe and Roy Campanella statue to the first 40,000 fans at that night’s game against the San Diego Padres. April 15, always a big day at Dodger Stadium, marks the 66th anniversary of Robinson breaking MLB’s color barrier.

It’s also a 2-star game under the Dodgers’ new tiered pricing plan. There are no bobblehead giveaways on 2- or 1-star games this season, so this might be as close as it gets.