Game 84: Good things come to those who wait, unless you were the Phillies tonight.

Howie Kendrick

Howie Kendrick slides in safely for one of two runs he scored in the Dodgers’ 10-7 win over the Philadelphia Phillies. (Stephen Carr/Staff photographer)

The “bullpen game” Monday wasn’t pretty, unless you’re a numerologist. Yimi Garcia threw the first pitch just after 7 p.m. Pacific Time. The game was still in the seventh inning (tied 7-7, naturally) when the clock struck midnight on 7/7 on the East Coast. The Dodgers burned through seven pitchers (the Phillies used three).

The teams combined to throw 368 pitches, which required a total of 4 hours and 13 minutes. J.P. Howell threw six of those pitches and was the winning pitcher. Only three nine-inning games in Dodgers history since 1914 (and probably forever) have lasted longer.

You can read the game story here; the box score is here and the photo gallery is here.

Adrian Gonzalez hit a solo home run and Yasmani Grandal hit a three-run shot for the Dodgers. Howie Kendrick went 4 for 5 and finished a home run shy of the cycle. Oh, and Jimmy Rollins drove in the go-ahead runs in the seventh inning to break that 7-7 tie, then scored the 10th run on his own. He spoke about this after the game (here and here).

Before the game, Chad Billingsley discussed his return to Dodger Stadium. Four Dodgers were named to the National League All-Star team, including Gonzalez and Grandal.

Game 61: The ordinary is extraordinary, the extraordinary is ordinary.

Yimi Garcia

Justin Turner and Yimi Garcia collided in the infield, letting Wil Myers’ pop-up fall with two outs in the seventh inning. An error was charged to Turner on the play. (Associated Press photo)

SAN DIEGO — The 2015 Dodgers are an interesting baseball team.

Clayton Kershaw struck out 11 batters in 6 ⅔ innings tonight. He got hit by a line drive. He gave up a home run to Clint Barmes, of all people. He threw more pitches than he’s thrown all season. This was a minor subplot.

(Watch Kershaw’s postgame interviews here.)

Alex Guerrero had one plate appearance. He fell behind 0-2, took a pitch in the dirt, then did something he’s done often enough this year to make you forget he’s a rookie, dumping a pinch-hit single into center field to win the game. Again: not the most compelling aspect of the Dodgers’ 4-3 win.

This is a team capable of making the extraordinary look completely ordinary, then turn around and look so fallibly human, like when Justin Turner and Yimi Garcia collided in the infield, A.J. Ellis ran the bases, and Adrian Gonzalez lost his cool:

Gonzalez talked about that quite a bit in my game story. The box score is here.

Paco Rodriguez has a bone spur in his left elbow. He’s hoping to postpone surgery until after the season is over.

Kenley Jansen returns from the 15-day disabled list at a good time for the Dodgers.

Kenley Jansen

Dodgers closer Kenley Jansen saved 44 games in 2014, his first full season as the Dodgers’ closer. (Getty Images)

When Dodgers closer Kenley Jansen underwent bone-graft surgery in his left foot in February, worry was a natural reaction. The front office spent the winter re-making the bullpen, going from a roster rich with rich former closers into a younger, less experienced unit.

Here we are on May 15, Jansen hasn’t pitched an inning and the Dodgers’ bullpen has been one of the most reliable in the majors.

Of course, rookie Yimi Garcia has blown two saves in two opportunities this week, so maybe Jansen is returning to the active roster at a good time. Still, he won’t be the Dodgers’ closer tonight and Jansen is OK with that. Actually, he prefers it this way.

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