County turnout about 18 percent; was about 80 percent in November

With about 90 percent of precincts reporter, voter turnout for Tuesday’s special election was 17.75 percent, according to the County of Los Angeles Registrar-Recorder/County Clerk’s office. That’s about 1 in 6 of the county’s 4.1 million registered voters. In November’s presidential election about 3.4 million people voted, or about 80 percent of registered voters.

Looks like it will be a family feud for Chu and Chu

Democrat Judy Chu and her distant cousin Republican Betty Tom Chu will face off in an runoff election on July 14.

With 89 percent of precincts reporting early Wednesday morning, Democrat Gil Cedillo was still far behind Democrat Judy Chu in the race to fill the 32nd Congressional District seat vacated by Labor Secretary Hilda Solis.

Chu had 32.5 percent of the vote compared to Cedillo’s 23.8. Chu jumped out to a huge lead after absentee ballots were reported . Although Cedillo narrowed the gap throughout Tuesday night and so far Wednesday morning, he is likely too far behind to catch Chu. 

For the Republican race, Betty Tom Chu, a distant cousin to Judy Chu, was leading with 10.2 percent of the vote. Not far behind was Republican Teresa Hernandez, owner of Cielito Lindo restaurant in South El Monte, with 8.3 percent of the vote. Hernandez’s campaign spent about $100,000, but she may have suffered from lack of name recognition. Betty Tom Chu is currently on the Monterey Park City Council and has long history in local politics and deep connections in the local banking community.

Newcomer Emanuel Pleitez also made a strong showing for the Democratic nomination. He earned 13.7 percent of the vote.

Because no candidate received more than 50 percent of the vote, the winners from each party are scheduled to square off on a July 14 runoff..

Cedillo, Hernandez still behind the Chus

With 86 percent of precincts reporting late Tuesday night, Democrat Gil Cedillo was still far behind Democrat Judy Chu in the race to fill the 32nd Congressional District seat vacated by Labor Secretary Hilda Solis.

Chu had 32.6 percent of the vote compared to Cedillo’s 23.7.

For the Republican race, Betty Tom Chu, a distant cousin to Judy Chu, was leading with 10.2 percent of the vote. Not far behind was Republican Teresa Hernandez, owner Cielito Lindo restaurant in South El Monte with 8.3 percent of the vote.

Newcomer Emanuel Pleitez also made a strong showing for the Democratic nomination. He earned 13.7 percent of the vote.

Because no candidate received more than 50 percent of the vote, the winners from each party will square off in another election.

Judy Chu and Betty Tom Chu maintain leads

With nearly two-thirds of precincts reporting, state Board of Equalization member Judy Chu maintains her lead in the race to replace former Rep. Hilda Solis representing much of the San Gabriel Valley in Congress.

Three hours after hours after the polls closed, with 65 percent of precincts reporting, Chu had 33 percent of the vote.

Though State Sen. Gil Cedillo, considered her main Democratic rival, is gaining on her lead, he continues to trail significantly with 25 percent of votes. Political newcomer Emanuel Pleitez, a 26-year-old financial analyst, is in third among Democrats, with 14 percent of the vote.

In the Republican race, Betty Tom Chu, a Monterey Park councilwoman and distant cousin of Judy Chu, holds the lead, with 10 percent of the vote. Restaurateur Teresa Hernandez, who spent nearly $100,000 in the race, much more than any other GOP candidate, trails with 8 percent; and David Truax, a former mayor of Covina, has 6 percent.

 

The top vote-getters from each party will face off in a special general election in July. Democrats outnumber Republicans in the district 2-1.  

Prop. F – lawmaker pay measure – leading by large margin

LOS ANGELES (AP) — If California is running a deficit, lawmakers shouldn’t get a raise.

The proposition was leading by a large margin in Tuesday’s statewide special election.

Voters
approved Proposition 1F, capping pay raises for lawmakers and statewide
officials whenever state government runs a deficit.

Lawmakers put
the measure on the ballot as part of a state budget package intended to
close a $42 billion state deficit. However, its passage will have
little effect on the state’s finances.

The measure was pushed by
Democrats to get state Sen. Abel Maldonado of Santa Maria to vote for
the budget compromise in February. The Republican’s vote was essential
to reaching the Legislature’s two-thirds vote requirement for the state
spending plan and tax increases.

Voters reject Propositions 1A, 1B

LOS ANGELES (AP) — California voters have rejected a ballot
measure that would have created a state spending cap while prolonging
temporary tax increases.

Proposition 1A was the centerpiece of
efforts by Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger and other state leaders to fix
California’s ongoing fiscal problems. It also would have strengthened
the state’s rainy day fund.

The measure’s defeat means
Proposition 1B, which would have restored more than $9 billion to
schools, cannot be enacted even if voters approve it. That measure also
was trailing in early returns Tuesday.

Proposition 1A generated
the most opposition among the six measures on Tuesday’s ballot. State
employee unions opposed the spending cap, while anti-tax groups
criticized the $16 billion in tax increases it would have triggered.

Prop 1E appears to have failed

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Voters have told lawmakers not to take money from mental health programs to help close the state deficit.

Voters rejected Proposition 1E in Tuesday’s special election.

Lawmakers
put the measure on the ballot in hopes of transferring $460 million
over the next two years from mental health services.

It was
backed by Senate President Darrell Steinberg who championed the
original 2004 initiative that taxed millionaires to raise funds for
mental health programs.

The Democrat from Sacramento had argued lawmakers were faced with difficult choices in a deepening recession.

Critics had warned the measure would cost the state more in the long run if mentally ill people were left without treatment.

Voters rejecting Prop 1D

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Californians don’t want to steer funding from young children to help the state’s struggling finances.

Voters
on Tuesday rejected Proposition 1D, leaving $1.7 billion in a program
that voters created 11 years ago for children age 5 and under.

Lawmakers
in February proposed redirecting money from the program known as First
5 as part of a budget deal intended to help close the state’s $42
billion deficit.

The program is funded through higher tobacco
taxes. Critics argued the measure would be a blow to a program that
each year takes in less money as fewer Californians smoke.

Lawmakers have warned they would have to make cuts in other children’s programs if voters rejected the measure.

Judy Chu dominates vote by mail ballots

State Board of Equalization member Judy Chu took an early lead in the race to replace Hilda Solis and represent the 32nd Congressional District.

Twenty minutes after the polls closed, with ten percent of polls reporting — mostly vote by mail ballots – Judy Chu had 42 percent of the vote.

 

State Sen. Gil Cedillo, considered her main Democratic rival, had 17 percent.

Republican Betty Tom Chu, a Monterey Park City Councilwoman, had 13 percent; followed by 26-year-old Democratic Emanuel Pleitez, a financial analyst, with 8 percent; Republican Teresa Hernandez, a restaurant owner, with 8 percent; and Republican David Truax, a former mayor of Covina, with 7 percent.

If no single candidate gets more than 50 percent of the vote, the top vote-getters from each party move on to the general election on July 14.