Final election results for SGV, Whittier-area water districts

– LA HABRA HEIGHTS CO WATER – BOARD OF DIRECTORS
VOTE FOR NO MORE THAN 2

BRAD COOKE               583     37.96
JEFFREY L HEINTZ       495     32.23
GEORGE L EDWARDS  458     29.82

– LA PUENTE VALLEY CO WATER – BOARD OF DIRECTORS
VOTE FOR NO MORE THAN 3

CHARLIE AGUIRRE           418     24.96
HENRY P HERNANDEZ     359     21.43
JOHN P ESCALERA          356     21.25
LOUIS PEREZ                   314     18.75
ELIZABETH BERMEJO      228     13.61

– ORCHARD DALE WATER – BOARD OF DIRECTORS
VOTE FOR NO MORE THAN 3

JOSEPH VELASCO III     493     30.41
R J “BOB” NOONAN       446     27.51
H C ESTABROOK           349     21.53
O “TOBY” CHAVEZ         193     11.91
ESTELA MACHORRO      140     8.64

– PICO WATER – BOARD OF DIRECTORS
VOTE FOR NO MORE THAN 3

ADRIAN L DIAZ                 837     18.07
VICTOR CABALLERO       803     17.33
JAMES B ROYBAL           696     15.02
SALVADOR M OROZCO   663     14.31
A (TONY) MARTINEZ         658     14.2
V AGUILERA GALARZA    603     13.02
A “ANDY” GONZALEZ       373     8.05

– VALLEY COUNTY WATER – BOARD OF DIRECTORS
VOTE FOR NO MORE THAN 3

MARIANA LAKE            1,356     18.02
LENET I PACHECO       1,329     17.66
ARMANDO MACIAS      1,178     15.65
DAVID SANO                1,025     13.62
KEN WOODS                1,006     13.37
HUGO L LAZO                  884     11.75
HENRY R KRAMER          748     9.94

Sawkins, Gutierrez and challenger De La Torre leading for San Gabriel City Council seats

Mayor Harry Baldwin and councilmembers Kevin Sawkins and David Gutierrez were running for re-election against one challenger, long-time resident Mario De La Torre. Baldwin appears to be the lone man out, with absentee ballots counted and 8 of 8 precincts reporting.

City Council:

Kevin Sawkins 1476, 25.6 percent
David Gutierrez 1451, 25.2 percent
Mario De La Torre 1444, 25.1 percent
Harry Baldwin 1381, 24.0 percent

City Clerk:
Eleanor Andrews 1728 (unopposed)

City Treasurer:
John Janosik 1710 (unopposed)

Measure A – Shall the Offices of City Clerk and City Treasurer be appointive?
Yes 979, 47.4 percent
No 1084, 52.5 percent

UPDATED: Race for three San Gabriel City Council seats too close to call

Here are the preliminary results, with absentee ballots counted and 4 of 8 precincts reporting. Incumbents Kevin Sawkins, David Gutierrez and Harry Baldwin are running for re-election, with Mario De La Torre the only challenger.

City Council:

Kevin Sawkins 1214
Mario De La Torre 1149
David Gutierrez 1141
Harry Baldwin 1120

City Clerk:
Eleanor Andrews 1388 (unopposed)

City Treasurer:
John Janosik 1360 (unopposed)

Measure A – Shall the Offices of City Clerk and City Treasurer be appointive?
Yes 784
No 880

Temple City update: Yu, Chavez still leading

With
2 of 7 precincts reporting and mail-in ballots counted, Vincent Yu and Tom Chavez were
leading early in the race for two Temple City City Council seats.

Yu had received 785 votes; Chavez, 641; former Councilman Chuck Souder, 534; Councilman Ken Gillanders, 435; Mayor Cathe Wilson, 380; and redevelopment consultant Silenus Ong, 203.

Wilson and Gillanders
are running for re-election, but bribery allegations against Wilson and
frustration over the city’s economic development problems have provided an opening in the race for the four challengers.

Yu, Chavez lead early in Temple City

In early election results Tuesday night, Vincent Yu and Tom Chavez were leading in the race for two Temple City City Council seats.

With only mail-in ballots counted, Yu had received 698 votes, and Chavez 501. Former Councilman Chuck Souder was in third with 458 votes. Councilman Ken Gillanders, Mayor Cathe Wilson and Silenus Ong trailed with 385, 327 and 188 votes, respectively.

Wilson and Gillanders are running for re-election, but bribery allegations against Wilson and frustration over the city’s economic development problems have tightened the race for the four challengers.

UPDATE: Liu, Huff hold large leads in state Senate seats

In early election results Tuesday night, Carol Liu was leading in the 21st state Senate District, while Assemblyman Bob Huff was ahead in the 29th District.

Liu, a Democrat and former Assemblywoman from La Caada Flintridge, was challenged by Republican Teddy Choi, a real estate agent from Pasadena, and Libertarian candidate Steve Myers, a computer programmer from Los Angeles, in her bid to succeed termed-out Sen. Jack Scott, D-Altadena.

With 84 percent of precincts reporting, Liu was leading with 67 percent of the vote. Choi was trailing with 25 percent.

From the Pasadena United Democratic Headquarters event at the Pasadena Hilton, Liu said she hadn’t so much doubted the outcome as she had worried about voter turnout.

“It is really wonderful. One of 40 (state senators) is a very small club, and we have a lot of work to do,” she said. “The state’s got budget problems, infrastructure problems — it’s got lots of issues that we need to work on.”

After serving in the La Caada Flintridge City Council from 1992-2000, Liu, a former school teacher, served two terms in the 44th Assembly District from 2000-2006.

Her platform emphasized a reassessment of the education system and structural reform of the state’s budget.

In the 29th District, returns showed Huff leading Democratic challenger Joseph Lyons, a medical researcher from Claremont, and Libertarian Jill Stone, a Temple City insurance agent.
The three were vying for the seat of former 29th District Sen. Bob Margett, R-Arcadia, who like Scott was also termed out.

With 76 percent of precincts reporting districtwide, Huff was ahead with 55 percent of the vote. Lyons was behind with 38 percent.

Huff has served two terms in the Assembly and was formerly a council member in Diamond Bar. He has consistently opposed tax-increase proposals, and he has also advocated restrictions on illegal immigration and government services to illegal immigrants.

Huff said he felt “relieved” by the results.

“There’s an old saying: You either run unopposed or you run scared. I’m of the school you run scared,” he said.

“We have the ability to incentivize businesses to invest in equipment, to hire workers — those are the things I’ll be working on as opposed to raising taxes,” he said.

UPDATE: Liu, Huff hold large leads in state Senate seats

In early election results Tuesday night, Carol Liu was leading in the 21st state Senate District, while Assemblyman Bob Huff was ahead in the 29th District.

Liu, a Democrat and former Assemblywoman from La Caada Flintridge, was challenged by Republican Teddy Choi, a real estate agent from Pasadena, and Libertarian candidate Steve Myers, a computer programmer from Los Angeles, in her bid to succeed termed-out Sen. Jack Scott, D-Altadena.

With 84 percent of precincts reporting, Liu was leading with 67 percent of the vote. Choi was trailing with 25 percent.

From the Pasadena United Democratic Headquarters event at the Pasadena Hilton, Liu said she hadn’t so much doubted the outcome as she had worried about voter turnout.

“It is really wonderful. One of 40 (state senators) is a very small club, and we have a lot of work to do,” she said. “The state’s got budget problems, infrastructure problems — it’s got lots of issues that we need to work on.”

After serving in the La Caada Flintridge City Council from 1992-2000, Liu, a former school teacher, served two terms in the 44th Assembly District from 2000-2006.

Her platform emphasized a reassessment of the education system and structural reform of the state’s budget.

In the 29th District, returns showed Huff leading Democratic challenger Joseph Lyons, a medical researcher from Claremont, and Libertarian Jill Stone, a Temple City insurance agent.
The three were vying for the seat of former 29th District Sen. Bob Margett, R-Arcadia, who like Scott was also termed out.

With 74 percent of precincts reporting districtwide, Huff was ahead with 55 percent of the vote. Lyons was behind with 38 percent.

Huff has served two terms in the Assembly and was formerly a council member in Diamond Bar. He has consistently opposed tax-increase proposals, and he has also advocated restrictions on illegal immigration and government services to illegal immigrants.

Huff said he felt “relieved” by the results.

“There’s an old saying: You either run unopposed or you run scared. I’m of the school you run scared,” he said.

“We have the ability to incentivize businesses to invest in equipment, to hire workers — those are the things I’ll be working on as opposed to raising taxes,” he said.

Gay marriage ban leading in L.A. County as well

In addition to its early statewide lead, Prop. 8 is leading in early returns in Los Angeles County.

The ballot measure, which would effectively ban same-sex marriage, leads statewide by a margin of 53 to 47 percent, with 33 percent of precincts reporting.

In L.A. County, the measure is leading by a slightly wider margin of 55 to 45 percent, with 23 percent of precincts reporting.

Community college bond measure leads early

Measure J, a $3.5 billion bond for Los Angeles Community College District projects, is leading by a large margin in early returns.

The measure is leading with about 66 percent of the vote. 11 percent of precincts have reported.

The bond would fund construction of new
buildings, repairs of old ones, and technology upgrades in classrooms across the district’s nine campuses – including
East Los Angeles College, which is actually in Monterey Park. ELAC is projected to see at least $400 million of that money, the most of any campus.

The measure affects those who live within
the LACCD boundaries, which includes parts of Monterey Park,
Montebello, Alhambra, San Gabriel, Rosemead and Pico Rivera, among
other cities.