“Stargate” (the movie)

Lately, I’ve been binge watching “Stargate SG-1,” the television series. Since I have liked the show so far (I’m in the middle of the sixth season), I thought it was time to go back to the beginning and watch the movie properly.

I know at some point that I tried to watch this movie; I remembered the beginning, but after that, and after watching the movie altogether, I can see why it was not particularly memorable.

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Battlestar Galactica: The Hand of God

The Fleet is running out of “gas” (aka Tilium), so when they find a Cylon-occupied asteroid full of the stuff, they decide to bring the fight to the robots and take what they need. In the B-plot, Roslin and Baltar are both seeing evidence of God’s hand at work in their lives (hence the title). On Caprica, Helo starts to suspect something’s up, while Athena is getting sick at regular intervals.

A note to first time BSG watchers; these aren’t the reviews for you. I plan to write about the show with the ending in mind. If you haven’t seen the show, you will be spoiled on stuff that happens at the end. You’ve been warned.

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Zathura

In my short time as a film critic, I have discovered one thing that seems to remain constant; no matter how I feel about them, children’s films are the hardest to write about.

I haven’t figured out the why yet, but for some reason, good, bad or just mediocre, the words don’t fly for me like they normally do. But, one way or another, my thought on “Zathura: A Space Adventure” will be written. God help us all.

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Battlestar Galactica: Tigh Me Up Tigh Me Down

Commander Adama has been acting suspicious, which only serves to deepen the President’s doubts about his humanity. However, when he brings Ellen Tigh to the Galactica, all suspicious eyes shift toward her. On Caprica, Helo and Athena run from the baddies.

A note to first time BSG watchers; these aren’t the reviews for you. I plan to write about the show with the ending in mind. If you haven’t seen the show, you will be spoiled on stuff that happens at the end. You’ve been warned.

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The Nasty Girl

First up, let’s address the unfortunate translation of “Das schreckliche Mdchen,” Michael Verhoeven’s 1990 film. The ‘nasty’ in the title is closer in meaning to something like mean or rude rather than any sexual meaning.

If that’s what you were thinking when you clicked on that link, sorry. You won’t find what you’re looking for here.

In case you decided to stick around, “The Nasty Girl” is about Sonja (Lena Stolze), a bright young German girl in the 1970s. She enters a Europe-wide essay contest while she’s in high school and wins the first prize for Germany. She gets a trip to Paris, a medal from the mayor and the admiration of friends and family alike.

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Battlestar Galactica: Flesh and Bone

A Leoben is discovered onboard one of the ships in the fleet; Starbuck interrogates (tortures) him and hears some good and bad news from the wordiest Cylon ever. On Caprica, not-Boomer decides to abandon the Cylon plan for her and Helo, and I’m going to start calling her Athena to celebrate her break with her people. I’m sure she’s thrilled.

A note to first time BSG watchers; these aren’t the reviews for you. I plan to write about the show with the ending in mind. If you haven’t seen the show, you will be spoiled on stuff that happens at the end. You’ve been warned.

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Battlestar Galactica: Six Degrees of Separation

After Gaius angers Head Six, a mysterious (Six-shaped) woman named Shelley Godfrey arrives on the Galactica and accuses (with proof) Gaius of aiding the Cylons in their attack on the colonies. After seven episodes (weeks), Helo and not-Boomer make Hera and finally get themselves a plot.

A note to first time BSG watchers; these aren’t the reviews for you. I plan to write about the show with the ending in mind. If you haven’t seen the show, you will be spoiled on stuff that happens at the end. You’ve been warned.

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Kitchen Privileges

“Kitchen Privileges (aka ‘Housebound’),” written and directed by Mari Kornhauser, is quite a mixed bag of a movie; on one side, you have a fairly well done drama about a woman recovering from a brutal rape. On the other side, you have a mishandled horror film that fails where it succeeds.

Confused yet? Back to the beginning.

Marie (Katharina Wressnig) has become an agoraphobic after being raped in an elevator about a year before the film begins.  She has adjusted her entire life to staying indoors, to the frustration and concern of her friends and her boyfriend. To supplement her income (and to help her feel safe), she takes in a tenant, Tom (Peter Sarsgaard), a cook on an oil rig who mostly comes and goes.

After a failed attempt at ‘outside’ leads her to a panic attack, Tom helps her through it, and the two of them begin the process of healing her, but like usual, not is all what it seems with this guy. He’s intensely private, he even locks the kitchen door when he’s cooking, and Marie is always hearing weird noises from behind his door. Could he be the mysterious freeway killer who dumps dismembered bodies before moving on to his next victim?

It sounds lame, and it does take a little time to get interested in these characters, but it does happen, thanks to the performances of Wressnig and Sarsgaard. If the movie had just been a psychological drama/horror film with just those two, I suspect I would have liked it more. However, there a number of bit players (most notably Marie’s odious sister Mignon, played by Angeline Ball) that show up to just ruin all the fun.  

(We’re moving in to spoiler territory after the jump; don’t click if you want to be surprised.)

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