Battlestar Galactica: No Exit

The
mutiny and its aftermath are still close to the surface as Anders
prepares for brain surgery (and shares some history with his fellow
Cylons); and our mysterious 12
th
Cylon returns to the forefront.

A
note to first time BSG watchers;
these
aren’t the reviews for you
.
I plan to write about the show with the ending in mind. If you
haven’t seen the show, you will be spoiled on stuff that happens at
the end. You’ve been warned.

Way
back when, I said this episode was one of my least favorites of the
series, going so far as to throw it in with the likes of “The Woman
King” and “Black Market”. Admittedly, that was a bit harsh, and
I can at least say now, that while it will probably never be one of
my favorites, it’s really not that bad.

We
actually get answers to some long-standing questions. A lot of
background information is revealed, to both us and some ultra-curious
Cylons. And we get to see Ellen Tigh square off with her ungrateful
first born (who seriously needs a nap). And we get to see what has
become of the great ship Galactica, whose very bones are rotting out
from under her.

Not
bad for an hour of television. I wish it felt less like housekeeping,
but what can you do.

The
big theme of this week’s episode is about the distinction between
machines and humanity. Yes, that’s been the theme of the show since
the beginning (at this point, even Galactica is getting in on that
plot as Tyrol starts mending her with organic material), but here we
see it in the fight between Ellen and Cavil.

Cavil
has always had a problem with humanity, and here we see that he hates
them because of who he is; an imperfect machine. He wants to be
perfect, but because his parents designed him as a Cylon, he’s stuck
with machine thoughts in a human body. Forever. And well, he’s pissed
about it, and since he was created and not born, he gets the rare
opportunity to both torture and rail against his maker.

He
may have some legitimate grievances and all, but he sounds more like
an angry kid who blames all the problems of his life on other people.
Sure, maybe he was made to be a certain way, but so was Athena, and
she choose to go against her programming and be something new. He has
done so many horrible things to humans, Cylons and Centurions that
he’s well past the point of sympathy.

And
at least for me, his suicide is beginning to make a lot more sense; I
really don’t think he could take living in a world where he didn’t
win.

And
good on Ellen for fighting the good fight for Boomer’s soul, even if
Boomer is already lost. Like Cavil, if she could, Boomer would burn
all that humanity out of her and just be a metal machine. But before
that, she’s got some more treachery and side-switching ahead of her.
Can’t wait.

Stray
thoughts

  • One
    standout scene amid all this exposition is Tigh with his sweet
    girlfriend and their baby. He’s never been a father (at least as far
    as he can remember), and here the parents are, happy and in love
    with the only child they’ll ever have. Considering what happens
    next, it’s both sweet and a heartbreaker. I expect no less from my
    beloved show.

Next
up: “Deadlock”