Management, on team building

OK, picking up the Q&A from yesterday, here’s a monster. The panel was asked about team pride and morale, and how there didn’t seem to be enough of it last season. The answer follows. If you intend to read the whole thing, make sure you schedule yourself regular breaks, to do things such as eat, sleep, mail Christmas cards and watch the 2009 and 2010 Stanley Cup Finals. I can’t be sure if these guys will ultimately build a winning franchise, but they sure can talk. Hopefully, you’ll find it to be a worthwhile read regarding their views on how to build a winning franchise…

———-

Question: There doesn’t seem to be much team pride or morale, other than a few guys. Coach Murray, I wonder how you will address this this year.

LOMBARDI: Let me address that first of all, then I’ll let Murphy talk to it. Based on Murph’s experiences, I think he can relate to that. But let me say this. Again, you’ve heard it before. I don’t think that you can build what you’re talking about without the majority of your team coming through your system. I’ve said it before. You don’t win championships with mercenaries. One of the problems is, we had to buy time, to get to the draft table, and to get that minor-league system young and develop them properly, you’ve got to go out into free agency and fill some holes. It’s hard on those players, in terms of becoming a team, because a lot of them are at the end of their career and they don’t really feel the Kings. You’ve heard that expression about those great teams. `They’ve got the Flyers tattooed on their ass, and it stays there for the rest of your life.’

You don’t get that without players coming through your system. When a Kopitar, Brown, Frolov, Johnson breaks in, that’s when you’re going to start building that. Then it keeps going, and I can see that happening. I use the Yankees analogy. They used to go out and get free agents and spend a billion dollars, but that character and chemistry never came back until Jeter, Rivera and Williams came through the system, and they kept them and it was `Yankee Pride’ again. That’s why I keep harping on it. That’s the intangible of going through this process. You can’t visualize it but you can feel it.

I used to have John Ferguson on my staff when I was in San Jose. He had won all those Cups in Montreal when he was a senior adviser, and nobody was more competitive than this guy and nobody wore that Montreal logo with more pride than him. I would ask him, when we were building and getting better, `Do you feel it?’ He would say, `You’re not quite there yet.’ You see it when kids get off the bus and when they get on the plane. You see it with those little taps on the pads in big moments. You see it when the bench immediately comes up and nobody is looking around for who got points. That’s when you get those little intangibles that you’re talking about. I remember John would say, `It’s coming,’ but you can’t define it. It’s like that judge said about obscenity. I can’t define it but I know it when I feel it and see it. But when I look at that team, and if I showed you age-distribution charts, I can look at an age-distribution chart, put the colors around the players that have been drafted and come through the system, and I can see it. When you don’t see home-grown players in that core age group, you’re probably going to be facing that problem you’re talking about.

That’s one of the things, when you’re developing and building a team, you have to stress to these guys the importance of being a teammate. That is critical, and as these kids come up through the system, it’s `teammate.’ We do everything possible, sometimes, to take them away from that. From the time they’re 14, 15 years old, they’ve got an agent, they’ve got college coaches, junior coaches, parents and everyone else, telling them, `It’s all about you.’ But if you can get that organization to where you’ve got that core of chemistry and caring, you can breed that. And I tell you, as a general manager that’s the most rewarding feeling. When you get off the plane and that guy has his chest out, like, `I’m a King and I’m proud to wear that jersey’… But it isn’t coming unless you draft and develop. I think Murph has been through this, so he can probably relate to some of the experiences.

MURRAY: I went through the same situation that we were just talking about here. The question was asked about spirit and competitiveness and attitude. When I go back to the Flyers, just in the last three years, the Flyers signed a bunch of free agents, brought them in and, on paper, they were good players. It should have been a real good hockey club but it ended up being a real issue, as we got to the middle of the season, because we had that group of guys who had not come through the system and who had been brought in as free agents. Then we had a group of young guys on the other side, who had been drafted and been in the organization for a couple years. And it just never meshed properly. There was always an issue with this veteran/young-guy team. They were divided as we went on the road and went out to team dinners. The guys would never seem to hang out together. That spirit, that was there in the first part of the season, really dissipated quickly as we got to the second half and the pressure and the key games came along. It just didn’t happen.

The same thing happened going back two years ago. We had the same kind of scenario. The younger guys were getting better. They were more mature and they were becoming more experienced, and it should have been their time to break through the glass ceiling and become more important players for your hockey club. It just didn’t happen. So last year in Philadelphia, there were changes made before the start of the year. A lot of veteran guys were moved off the team or were bought out or traded, and there was an opportunity given to the young guys who had been drafted by the Flyers, brought in and nurtured and now given a big opportunity to take over ownership of that hockey club. I think, as you go through that year last year, you see the young players growing. I’m talking about Richards and Carter and Umberger and Colborne. The young guys took that team over and took ownership and there became a tremendous spirit and tremendous attitude. You have great success because of that.

In my view, it’s not a climb that’s going to go straight up. There’s lots of bumps along the road. Again, I can relate to last year, in particular, with the Flyer team getting it. Right before the all-star break, that team was one point behind Ottawa for first place in the conference. We came back from the all-star break and lost 10 games in a row. Because the responsibility was on the young players, they couldn’t figure it out and they had a tough time putting it together and playing the game the right way. But they ended up… In the last 15 games, I think the team had to win 13 of the last 15 games in order to make the playoffs and then go into the third round. So, good things happen, but it doesn’t come quickly and it doesn’t come easily. But I tell you this: I know how to do it. I know what needs to be done in order for this to get turned around and headed in the right direction.

When I got back in my experiences as a coach, which is now 28 years as a coach in this league, my first coaching opportunity was with the Washington Capitals. I retired as a player and got into coaching. The team had never made the playoffs, in their eight years of existence in the league. I got into the coaching side of it, as an assistant coach. My brother was the head coach, Bryan, who some of you might know as the general manager and coach in Anaheim. But that team took off and made the playoffs and had a tremendous run for a long period of time. In Washington, I ended up being the head coach, and more young players were coming into the organization. We started putting players in place who were now taking more ownership. This is the key to success in the NHL. Going into Philadelphia as a head coach, that team had not made the playoffs in five years. There was a lot of dysfunction going on, but they definitely were headed in the right direction with young guys who were in place. That was their opportunity to take over ownership of the team. Lindros, Karl Dykhuis, Chris Therion, Shjon Podein, Trent Klatt, Mikael Renberg, John LeClair, Eric Desjardins…all those young guys came and took over that hockey club and we made it to the Stanley Cup Finals in year three that I was coaching there. Again, the youth, the spirit that grows with the team, the opportunity that they have to take ownership of that hockey team, that’s what it’s all about.

This is the direction that we want to head in with the Los Angeles Kings. We have a lot of young players in this organization, talented players, players who are very hungry to take over this hockey club. It’s going to take time. The growth period is not just one way. There’s going to be some bumps. You have to take a step back to take two forward, sometimes. So be patient with it, but it’s there, it’s in place.

I know what this team needs. It needs structure, it needs discipline, it needs accountability, it needs a system, and we have to work mainly, in this first training camp and throughout the year, on the defensive part of the game. We have to cut back on our goals against. We have to give our goaltender better support. From the first day of training camp, we are going to talk about defense, we’re going to be talking about accountability, the number of goals against, better penalty killing and better numbers are what it’s going to be all about, in order for a solid foundation to be put in place. Once you get the solid foundation, believe me, nobody loves to score more goals than me. I want a team that’s going to attack and going to be putting pucks to the net and is going to play real hard on the offensive side of the game. But that has to come after we get this defensive part of the game in place. That will be the priority as we move forward from the first day of the training camp.

HEXTALL: I think what Dean wants me to hit on is, what it means to be a Los Angeles King. I can tell you right now what it means to be a Philadelphia Flyer. I was drafted when I was 18 years old and I came through the system. I hated them when I was drafted, but I really came to admire them, because they were all about winning and all about sacrifice. … I look at a guy like Dustin Brown. The kid is a L.A. King. He’s not a Flyer, he’s not a Ranger, he’s a King. Wherever Brownie ends his career, and hopefully it’s here, but wherever he ends it, he will always go back and say, `I’m a L.A. King.’ He came up through the system, he was drafted… and you can say the same about Kopi and hopefully Jack and hopefully some of the young defensemen coming through, hopefully Patrick O’Sullivan, this is a young group right now that’s going to get it.

We also have the other group from Manchester, the Brian Boyles and the Moulsons and the Purcells and the Harrolds. It’s like we’ve got these two groups right now, and they’re separated. Our vision, right now, is that these two groups will come together and form the type of team, and having the type of heart and connection to the Kings organization, that they own this team and they own this franchise. That’s the type of passion you have to bring every night, like the Detroit Red Wings do now. They’re a home-grown team. They’ve added some nice free agents to fill holes, but you absolutely cannot build through free agency. You can fill a hole, but you cannot build a foundation.

The only thing I can relate to is, I came up in 1986-87 with the Flyers. We had a young team. We were a pretty good team, but we weren’t the best team in the league. We had the Rick Tocchets and the Derek Smiths and the Pelle Eklunds, and then we had another group, the Brian Propps, the Dave Poulins, and then we had the Mark Howes and the Brad McCrimmons. But we had a lot of home-grown guys and we had a lot of character. The sacrifice that that team made for each other, day in and day out, not only through the playoffs but through the whole regular season, I can’t explain the feeling. I’m not sure I can even explain how or why it happened, other than the fact that we had guys with passion and we had guys who were Flyers.

That’s exactly the kind of thing we’re trying to bring into this organization, where we’ve got guys who are proud and stick their chest out and say, `You know what, I’m proud to be a L.A. King.’ When we get to that point, when we bring this group from Manchester and the kids we’ve got coming from junior, together with the Jack Johnsons and the Kopitars and the Browns, this thing is going to roll. I can’t tell you how excited I am about the future of this franchise. I’m not trying to sell. I’m not a salesman, I’ve told you guys that before. But again, when you bring your youth up, guys who have `L.A. Kings’ stamped on their heart, you’ve got it going, and that’s where we’re headed.

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  • kingskicka$$

    Great stuff Rich! Thanks for working on Sunday!

  • wavesinair

    Awesome Rich. Love it!

    I give all 3 of them an ‘A’ for enthusiasm. I also give them an capital ‘D’ for desperate.

    “I’m not a salesman…But again…guys who have `L.A. Kings’ stamped on their heart, you’ve got it going…”

    He must mean guys that have come up through the system and then were shipped off. Guys like Mike Cammalleri, Lubomir Visnovsky, Rob Blake, Jaroslav Modry, Joe Corvo, Darryl Sydor, George Parros, Eric Belanger, etc. etc. You know, guys that could have been the heart and soul of this team right now.

    Who’s to say the exact same thing isn’t going to happen in a couple of years? First with Cammallari, now with O’sullivan. Next, Kopitar? Being a King is one thing, but dealing with a franchise that has been the laughing stock of the league is very, very hard to change. Players know it, agents know it, wives know it, other teams know it. This whole season reeks of desperation.

  • EJ

    wavesinair said:

    “This whole season reeks of desperation.”

    . . . in your mind. But it’s really all a matter of perspective. As absolutely cornball as this sounds, I see it as an exciting journey. Sure the destination is unknown, but that’s what makes it fun. If we knew the ending, it would be a bore.

    As a fan of hockey since the early ’70s, I’ve lived and died with a lot of King teams (died a lot, actually). But what I’ve really learned along the way is that it’s not about one game, one month, or even one season. It’s not even about one team. It’s about watching the greatest hockey players in the world come and go.

    We’re at a point where we’re going to watch a lot of talented young players try and put the Kings back on the map. That’s exciting. Hopefully, as the years pass, we’ll see most of these guys make the Kings a viable force in the league . . . for a long, long time . . . hopefully until I die.

    But whatever happens, I love watching (and playing) this game. It never gets old, and it never gets dull.

  • cristobal

    “Going into Philadelphia as a head coach, that team had not made the playoffs in five years. There was a lot of dysfunction going on, but they definitely were headed in the right direction with young guys who were in place. That was their opportunity to take over ownership of the team. Lindros, Karl Dykhuis, Chris Therion, Shjon Podein, Trent Klatt, Mikael Renberg, John LeClair, Eric Desjardins…all those young guys came and took over that hockey club and we made it to the Stanley Cup Finals in year three that I was coaching there.”

    OK – Desjardins and Leclair already had cup rings, Hextall and Forsberg among others shipped out for Lindros who eventually fell completely out with Clarke, and a bunch of middling players like Therien who became, shortly, obsolete. Trent Klatt came here and retired young. Plus, they never won the Cup, so where did it get them?

    As for the Flyers now, I guess they consider Smyth and Briere homegrown, and Pitkanen a journeyman? Where are they coming up with this stuff?

    All this BS is amazing…Unbelievable how a good paycheck can get these “lifelong” Flyers to start blowing the Kings horn. What kind of dedication is that? You know where dedication to the Kings gets you Hextall? Just ask Dave Taylor.

    I am considering the Ducks as my new team…I want an owner who’s dirty and out in the open. The more punishment the NHL dishes on Samueli, the more I like him.
    I almost want to see these guys embarrassed more and more. The ghost of Alexei Lalas is possessing these guys. I still want to know what winning tradition Lombardi has been an integral part of, or if he ever played an NHL game?

    I still can’t get over the lousy deals Lombardi is still making. Heres an idea, trade for guys under contract and free of injuries. Richardson and Stoll restricted and hurt? Who taught you that Dean? Create a chart of how Dave Taylor managed to acquire Tim Gleason for Brian Smolinski at the deadline, and raped the Islanders for Ziggy, one of the best Kings of all time. Then, look at what he gave you in the draft and how you’re trying to build around HIS foundation. It would help you immensely.

  • Quisp

    I’m wondering what kind of Kings fan could contemplate becoming a Ducks fan instead.

  • rjc76

    I’m thinking he’s a Ducks fan already who’s just in here to rile the King’s fans.

  • ChrisH

    I presume ‘Josh Ferguson’ is actually the late 5-time Cup winner ‘John Ferguson’. Yeesh.

  • Al

    I have been reading this Fan??? crap and I really use that word Fan, extremely loose here. What is with you people, if you don’t like the way things are being done by the Kings organization then blow off and jump on the Ducks, Sharks or any of the 27 other teams. So what if they haven’t won the Cup or made the playoffs in the last few years. Look at all the great talent that you have gotten to see both visitors and the Kings. Do you think any player young or older would like to come here and play if they read all the bitching and derogatory remarks made by people who say they are “hockey fans” If everyone of the kids who are playing for the Kings asked to be traded because of the lack of support that they get from “Kings Fans”???? I wouldn’t blame them one bit. Most of you are people who just fill seats and have no clue on how to be a fan. You think that berating the front office and the coaching staff and the farm teams and players that have been brought in to help the team, is being a fan. If any of you were capable of judging people who have been in the game all of their lives then you wouldn’t be here talking through your a$$es. And if you don’t think some of the players don’t read this site, you are looney and if I was a player and read what was said here about me or my teammates I’d probably tell them “Boy do we have some great fans behind us, way,way behind us” You want these kids to go bust their a$$ so you can act like you called the shots and you made the decisions, no wonder some of these players don’t want anything to do with the fans, I wouldn’t want anything to do with alot of you here either. You have no idea just how exciting this season can be or is going to be.

  • socalkings

    I like going to Staples to watch the Kings play. It’s fun. The nights that they just pack it in make me sick. I like the youth movement. I like to see kids PLAY for their places on the Kings. Roenick, Cloutier, Blake(v.2) all had their slots everynight and didn’t hustle to keep them. I do not care to see another poser come in and expect ice time and not play for it. I don’t mind another losing season, as long as they PLAY up to their potential. I think success will follow, eventually.

    As for all the dissatisfied fans, go on and hitch your wagon to some other team, I’m sure we’ll see you back in 2 or 3 years

  • Anonymous

    wavesinair said:
    “He must mean guys that have come up through the system and then were shipped off. Guys like Mike Cammalleri, Lubomir Visnovsky, Rob Blake, Jaroslav Modry, Joe Corvo, Darryl Sydor, George Parros, Eric Belanger, etc. etc. You know, guys that could have been the heart and soul of this team right now.”

    Exactly.

    My first thought was of Visnovsky. He was a committed LA King through and through. He only wanted to play for the Kings. His salary, up until the last contract, was way below market value and even the new one was still a bargain, especially if you compare it to wasting $12 million on Rob Blake the last two years. Getting rid of him because of projected salaries for younger players who haven’t even proven themselves yet and signing new veteran players at high salaries, with injury histories, who, again, haven’t proven they can play to the level hoped for, is the epitomy of double-talk. Once again, Lombardi traded proven, quality home- grown players and brought in outsiders then has the nerve to say this stuff.

  • KingFan4ever

    Blah, Blah….I’ll believe it when I see it. Actions not words. I’m done with all the blabbing. Now let’s see results.

  • Anonymous

    I have been an avid reader of this blog for awhile now and have been reluctant to post any comments because I don’t want to be involved in this nonsense but after reading your post Al I thought I’d drop a line and just say I agree with you 100%. I am a Kings fan and I will stand by my team and will choose to believe in the direction they are heading.

  • OCPiker

    wavesinair said: “He must mean guys that have come up through the system and then were shipped off. Guys like Mike Cammalleri, Lubomir Visnovsky, Rob Blake, Jaroslav Modry, Joe Corvo, Darryl Sydor, George Parros, Eric Belanger, etc. etc. You know, guys that could have been the heart and soul of this team right now.”

    While I hear what you are saying, I think you’re missing the whole point. All those players were drafted, brought up, and played during a different regime and atmosphere. Somewhere along the lines, prior to DL’s arrival, the team concept fell apart. I mean just look at the ’05-’06 season. The team took great strides during the first half of the season, and then a complete meltdown that was attributed to both injuries and lack of team unity. Point being, that’s something DL is trying to prevent with this current group. He’s trying to instill a positive culture and a sense of loyalty to an organization.

    Quisp said:
    “I’m wondering what kind of Kings fan could contemplate becoming a Ducks fan instead.”

    You know I can’t believe I read that either. Here we have Kings fans stating they’re true and passionate fans. Yet don’t have the patience and let their frustration get the better of them. I admit, I’ve been disappointed many times with this organization and I’ve been a fan for 20+ years. Not once have I ever thought about jumping on the bandwagon and supporting another team. I mean I live in Huntington Beach where people only root for the Ducks because they won the Stanley Cup and it’s trendy, yet know nothing about the team or hockey in general. I thought there were already too many bandwagoners here in the OC, can’t believe it’s starting to spread in the LA area. So much for dedication.

    cristobal said: “I still can’t get over the lousy deals Lombardi is still making. Heres an idea, trade for guys under contract and free of injuries. Richardson and Stoll restricted and hurt? Who taught you that Dean? Create a chart of how Dave Taylor managed to acquire Tim Gleason for Brian Smolinski at the deadline, and raped the Islanders for Ziggy, one of the best Kings of all time. Then, look at what he gave you in the draft and how you’re trying to build around HIS foundation. It would help you immensely.”

    I think you bring up really valid points. Really, no joke, I think you do at times. Those deals you mentioned, yes, Dave Taylor managed to make those acquisitions and came out on top at the end. What you have to remember is the context of his termination. Look at every year since 2001. The Kings usually ended up in the middle of the pack in standings. They finished just short of the playoffs but not bad enough to gain much ground in the draft. Going through this year after year, ownership (and I use that term loosely because I’m very suspicious of AEG intentions at times) decided for a change. While I agree with you that Dean has made some questionable signings, you have to look at the bigger picture. Those signings were not intended to be anything more than just “stop-gaps” to fill holes while prospects (regardless of who drafted them) developed properly. Keep in mind that this is year three for DL. His first year was a complete overhaul from top to bottom of the organization. Ask anyone who has run a successful business and they too will tell you that it takes time. Now you can make the argument about what Tampa Bay is doing, but keep in mind, it seems that they’re looking for a “quick-fix” rather than an organizational overhaul. Year two of DL’s plans seemed to be an attempt to “medicate” the problem from year one to ease the pains of fans. However, I personally think it backfired and wasn’t necessary. To me, all those signings did nothing to fill the needs of the organization because there were too many “offensive-minded” defenceman with no grit. Personally I feel Crawford played some role in the demise because of his coaching style and ideologies. But that’s a different conversation. What I’m saying to you is that, yes, while this year may not be “the year” everyone has been hoping for, I personally think it will be exciting to watch. You look at players coming up from Manchester this year and competing for a job up front. Yes the d’corps will be young and inexperienced, but I think with this coaching staff emphasizing defense (something completely opposite of Crawford’s style), you’ll see more responsibility in our own end and alleviate some of the pressure with the goalies. Again, while they most likely won’t make the playoffs this year, you have to admit they will be more exciting to watch this year.

  • cristobal

    Al – I don’t really ever say anything negative about NHL players. I respect what they do too much. The most negative thing I say, hopefully, is that guys like Guliano and Zeiler are not really NHL quality. Also, I will criticize management for overpaying players I don’t feel ever deserved the size of contract Lombardi gave them.

    I can look to the ducks for hockey entertainment because they have some great players. It doesn’t mean I don’t hope the Kings young guys don’t do well, on the contrary, I’m upset they rid the team of so many players I liked, wether the team was doing well or not. I seriously question some of the return on those players I liked, for instance, Stuart brought only a 2nd round pick- from detroit no less. I bring up the fact that Taylor, at the deadline, got a player like Gleason for Smolinski. I think it showed respect for Smolinski that he didn’t ship him out for 3rd rounders, like happened with Sopel.

    I really see no reason to keep supporting this team if I feel that they are all talk about team players, but ship out the guys who perform because they will exceed the “team cap.” I just don’t care to support it anymore. I’m going to remain a hockey fan, and just watch good hockey. I’m sure the Kings youngsters will provide that even if at first it’s sporadically. I may be poor fan, but they’ve been a poor franchise. AEG is bad for hockey. They’re bad for sports. I love the players. Even Kings fans have told me I overrate Kopitar. Brown is pure quality and I love how he’s grown into a great 1st line forward. I hope Doughty, Teubert, and Tavares become hall-of-fame players. But I don’t care about the “Kings of AEG” one bit.

    aloha

  • mrk

    Cristobal, seriously. I don’t mind much reading your rants, I enjoy it and I do agree w/ you in some ways sometimes. But you’ve really hit bottom talking ’bout becoming a Ducks fan. You will be the very definition of “riding the bandwagon”. Please think about what you just said.

  • typicaljs

    if you know what players playing for their team and having a passion for their team look like, you would know Cammy was not playing for the kings last season. He was playing for himself and trying to make his contract expectations look realistic. I think you can forgive DL for trading away belanger and gleason because it landed us JMFJ. I’m sure Dean would love to have either or both of those players back at the right role for the right price some time down the line.

  • Quisp

    Hey, being a sports fan is all about misery. My grandma — and I know I’ve said this before — was born in 1908 (a.k.a. the last year the Cubs won the World Series), moved to Chicago in the 20s and followed the Cubs every game on the radio and then on TV until she died in the 1990s. She drew up her own friggin’ box scores and compared them to the paper the next day. 162 times a year for 70 years. They broke her heart in ’45 (I think it was ’45) when they got to the series and lost. Me, I grew up a Boston Bruins fan, which, after ’72, was nothing but heartbreak. You’re supposed to go your whole life with only a couple of championships to show for it. That’s the way it works. That’s what makes it so sweet when you win. You know that sports is drama — I mean drama like the theater, like a great story — only there’s no predetermined outcome. Anything can happen. Anything. Kings fans have been holding on a long time. Imagine how unbelievable it will feel to win a cup in LA, for the fans who have been hanging in there for decades. Grown men will weep. It will be worth it.

  • OCPiker

    cristobal said: “…I’m upset they rid the team of so many players I liked, wether the team was doing well or not. I seriously question some of the return on those players I liked, for instance, Stuart brought only a 2nd round pick- from detroit no less. I bring up the fact that Taylor, at the deadline, got a player like Gleason for Smolinski. I think it showed respect for Smolinski that he didn’t ship him out for 3rd rounders, like happened with Sopel.”

    Maybe I’m reading too much into this, but players you liked? Shouldn’t it be for the greater good of the team and not who you personally like? Yes, the trade of Stuart didn’t reap major rewards (2008 2nd draft pick, which was traded away I believe to Colorado, AND a 2009 fourth round pick). But again, you’re missing two important points. The first is the market for a defenceman of his caliber. Yes, he proved to be instrumental in Detroits cup run, but before the trade, his numbers and his play didn’t seem worthy enough for a team trading for him to risk their own assets in return. We all know how much we get mad when a deal is made where we gave up too much on a trade we thought would have an upside. The second point is the salary cap. When it became apparent that the Kings were out of the playoff hunt, DL had to start dumping salary. That’s one thing everyone has to start getting used to in factoring the acquisition of players. There is no reason for a GM to take on salary from a trade if they are looking to rebuild because fiscally that doesn’t make sense. Nor is it feasible to continue to pay a player in their last year of their contract when you run the risk of losing them over the summer for nothing in return. You can’t compare the trade your referring to with Gleason/Smolinski because Dave Taylor didn’t have to necessarily have to abide to salary cap issues. Although I see what you’re saying, that action most likely wouldn’t have taken place in the post-cap era.

  • Baumgartner22

    not sure we “raped” the isles for ziggy palffy. we gave up ollie jokinen in the deal.

  • Marc Nathan

    Terry Murray is “Murphy?” 0K… if you say so Deano…

  • yesitscal

    OCPiker said: “Maybe I’m reading too much into this, but players you liked? Shouldn’t it be for the greater good of the team and not who you personally like?”

    See? This is the problem that Dean is trying to point out with past years of the Kings. There’s no “I” in “team”, and too many selfish people hurt the overall product. It happens on here as well, where certain people want things done their way or else they’re miserable and take it out on the rest of us.

    I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again–hockey is a game! it’s supposed to be fun, not life or death! Lighten up enough to enjoy the season and have a little fun on the way!!!

    Happy Monday to everybody!

  • http://www.akl.lt/akl-2.9/baltix/Members/LcdMonitor Michele

    How are you. Every moment of one’s existence one is growing into more or retreating into less. Help me! I find sites on the topic: How does vermox work for worms. I found only this – wall clock with timers. Video that multi-monitor flicker moves also to the rubber-hose landscape, which may be several from the range that was usually grown, lcd monitor. This fax quite works an regular addition to create display compromise, lcd monitor. With best wishes :cool: , Michele from Slovakia.