ONT records a nearly 15 percent drop in passenger traffic

August passenger traffic at L.A./Ontario International Airport declined nearly 15 percent from the same month last year, making it the largest drop in monthly passenger traffic since May. Prior to that the largest drop in passenger traffic was last seen in October 2011.

Figures released by Los Angeles World Airports on Thursday show ONT recorded a 14.8 percent decline in passenger traffic with 338,387 travelers in August. The number was 396,632 in August 2012.

Overall, there was a 9.45 percent decline in the amount of travelers coming in and out of the medium-hub facility for the first eight months of the year compared with the same period in 2012.

In May, there was a 9.3 percent from the same month last year.

In 2011, the airport experienced a 10.2 percent decline in passenger traffic compared with the same month in 2010.

So far 2.6 million passengers have utilized the airport in 2013.

Facebook Twitter Pinterest Plusone Reddit Tumblr Email

Hearing on ONT lawsuit set for later this month

The first hearing in the lawsuit filed by Ontario which aims to dissolve an almost 50-year-old agreement with Los Angeles to operate L.A./Ontario International Airport is scheduled for Sept. 25 at Riverside County Superior Court.

Ontario filed the lawsuit June 4 seeking to regain control of ONT.

“The court may either take the matter under advisement or issue its decision on Los Angeles’ preliminary motions at that time,” said Roy Goldberg, the attorney representing Ontario in its lawsuit.

Los Angeles has made a motion to dismiss the case, arguing that the claims are not legally relevant, he said.

Michael Lawson, former president of Los Angeles World Airports Board of Airport Commissioners, has also denied Ontario’s claim.

“There is no sound, legal or factual basis for this claim,” Lawson said at a meeting earlier this summer.

Facebook Twitter Pinterest Plusone Reddit Tumblr Email

Long lines at ONT?

Ever encounter issues or long wait times while going through the checkpoint at LA/Ontario International Airport?

(I’ve been meaning to get to this item since last week but it’s been a little busy.)

Jim Bowman, at last week’s Ontario International Airport Authority, brought up an issue he recently noticed while traveling through the airport – a long line that had formed to go through the first checkpoint.

“I noticed a rather extraordinary long line of what should have been manned by someone, instead there was an abandoned TSA station,” he said.

Bowman said there was nobody there to process travelers.

This might be something that the new Federal Security director at ONT, Martin Elam, may handle or want to address in the future.

But that’s not all. Bowman, a longtime Ontario Councilman, said he was disappointed in the airport’s appearance.

“Service is everything, appearance is everything and the outside of the airport looks atrocious,” he said.

According to Bowman the grass near Terminal 4 has grown a nearly a foot tall.

“These are situations that a good partner doesn’t make with an asset of such value,” he said. “This exudes the reasons that L.A. is so far away and just doesn’t care about Ontario.”

ONT is managed by Los Angeles World Airports.

Have you ever encountered similar issues? Let me know.

Facebook Twitter Pinterest Plusone Reddit Tumblr Email

What’s ONT’s tipping point?

LA/Ontario International Airport may be capable of 12 million annual passengers but projections show it may only handle fewer than 4 million passengers this year – 25 percent of its capacity.

And that decline is noticeable in the terminals which are empty and quieter. Less than 70 percent of people now traveling in and out of the airport compared to pique activity only a couple of years ago.

It’s this scenario that has Ontario International Airport Authority president Alan Wapner wondering what is Ontario’s tipping point, what could force the closure of the airport?

“There’s got to be a minimum operating costs at the airport. I want to find out what that is and what’s the tipping point of survival at ONT,” Wapner asked. “People have got to wake up and understand you can’t continue this steep downward spiral into infinity.” Continue reading

Facebook Twitter Pinterest Plusone Reddit Tumblr Email