Photo gallery: Mirai Nagasu of Arcadia places fourth in her first Olympics


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>>INSIDER 
It was quite a night for women’s figure skating. Gold medalist Kim Yu-na of South Korea gave what will likely go down as one of the greatest performances in the history of the sport.
Canada’s Joannie Rochette melted hearts with her bronze-winning performance, just four days after the sudden death of her mother.
And our own Mirai Nagasu, just 16 years old and hailing from Arcadia, jumped two positions to finish in fourth place after a near-perfect performance. More than anything, her winning personality has been a highlight of the winter Olympics.
Nearly all the competitors seemed pleased with the outcome. Here’s a round-up of the best photos of Nagasu in the final, long-form program in Vancouver.

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Photo gallery: Arcadia’s Mirai Nagasu on the ice in Vancouver


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>>INSIDER 
“I eat, sleep and drink ice skating. Then, I do my homework,” 16-year-old Mirai Nagasu of Arcadia told our staff reporter Stacey Wang.
On Tuesday, members of the Pasadena Figure Skating Club gathered in Arcadia to watch their friend and peer perform in the women’s figure skating competition at the Vancouver 2010 Olympics.
Here she is on the ice in Vancouver, during her short program performance Tuesday and, further below, during a training session on Sunday.
Nagasu’s race for a medal is becoming a stretch — but definitely not out of reach. In order to medal, Nagasu will need not only a near-perfect long program Thursday, but also one of the front-runners will need to fall behind, the Associated Press reports.

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‘Pasadena Babalon’: The world of Jack Parsons, on stage at Caltech

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“Pasadena Babalon” lives in the in-between space of things we know and don’t know about John Whiteside Parsons.
Jack, they called him; He, the young genius of a nascent aerospace industry as it emerged in Southern California, of the founding of Aerojet Corp. and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, and of the darkest pursuits of occult ritual and magic.
The Theater Arts at the California Institute of Technology takes on all these sides of Parsons in its new production, covering a broad swath of territory from his childhood to his death in 1952.
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Drumroll, please: Carmelite nuns to hold first-ever public concert, live and ‘unplugged’ in Duarte

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It wouldn’t be fair to compare “The Carmelite Sisters in Concert: Unplugged” to the movie “Sister Act” because Whoopi Goldberg and her merry band of nuns have nothing on this group of devoted Southland singers.
Members of the Carmelite Sisters of the Most Sacred Heart of Los Angeles — for whom music is intricately woven in their daily lives inside the convent — will perform for the public for the first time on Feb. 28 at the Madonna Hall Community Center in Duarte.
Performers will range from nuns who took their vows decades ago to novices and candidates still in the process of discerning a religious life. They come from the different Carmelite facilities in Southern California, including the Sacred Heart Retreat Center in Alhambra.
Some of the sisters double up as singers and musicians. They will play guitar, bass, flute, violin and drums to accompany some of the more lighthearted pieces, including “Prince of Peace,” which will start with a drum solo by one of the nuns.
“We hear each other every day, but coming together like this is just so beautiful,” said Sister Scholastica, the concert’s stage manager and the Alhambra group’s choir director.
Sister Scholastica described the concert line-up as a little mix of everything — including an original composition by one of the Carmelite nuns, hymns and Gregorian chants. The sisters’ first song will be the Solemn Salve, which they typically chant during morning prayers at the break of dawn.
“We feel that the world today needs God’s peace,” Sister Timothy Marie said. “This is our small way of bringing light in the darkness.”
$35 donation. Feb. 28, 7 p.m. Madonna Hall, 819 Buena Vista St., Duarte. 626-289-1353, ext. 246

Rose Magazine wins Award of Excellence from Society for News Design

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Exciting news! Rose Magazine has won an Award of Excellence in the Society for News Design’s 31st Edition Best of News Design Competition.
The award is in the category of magazines, inside features page design, for our page made entirely out of flowers and organic material in December’s Rose Parade edition.
Back in December, we chronicled on this blog the making of our Rose Magazine mini-float. To call the process laborious would be an understatement, but our design team managed to have a blast with the project. We worked late, late, late into the night, supporting each other through moments of delirium and exhaustion and outbursts of laughter.
There couldn’t be any greater validation of our efforts than recognition from the SND.
Even more exciting is the caliber of work by fellow winners in this category and the competition at large. We feel a little star-struck to be in such good company.
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Letters from New York: Rodarte at the Cooper-Hewitt


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If you’re planning a trip to New York between now and mid-March, there’s a new exhibit at the Cooper-Hewitt, National Design Museum that focuses on Pasadena residents Kate and Laura Mulleavy — they of the acclaimed U.S. fashion label Rodarte.
The exhibit delves into the Mulleavys’ unique process of creation; The sisters execute complex manipulation of materials and meticulous techniques, first deconstructing and then rebuilding the elements into high fashion.
As an example, from January’s lengthy New Yorker profile by Amanda Fortini:
“They often speak of ‘building’ a dress. To create their garments, which tend to include a multitude of textiles (and finicky ones, like tulle, organza, leather, and lace), adornments (crystals, feathers, rosettes), and techniques (draping, pleating, dyeing), the Mulleavys work with a team of three seamstresses, a pattern-maker, a dyer, a leather worker, and three knitters. One mid-length yellow chiffon dress from the 2006 fall collection took a hundred and fifty hours to complete.”

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It’s a nice day for a white wedding … show

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It could be pure genius or just mere coincidence that a week after Valentine’s Day there is an abundance of wedding shows all over L.A. and Orange Counties and beyond — the most I’ve seen in just one weekend.
But offering something a little different from the rest is the White Satin Wedding Show being held from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. this Sunday, Feb. 21, at the University Club Pasadena.
There will still be a variety of wedding vendors and features just like any other wedding show but they want to kick it up a notch with events such as sparkling sake tastings, “Ask the Experts” with a panel of Southern California’s top wedding planners, and a special demonstration by the Rose City Ballroom dancers led by ABC’s “Dancing with the Stars” choreographer, Christian Perry.
A bridal show by designer Deborah LaFranchi will begin at 1 p.m. followed by the dancers then a groom show by Friar Tux will start at 2:30 p.m.
The wedding planners scheduled are Mary Dann-McNamee, Tobey Dodge, Michael Willms and Kevin Covey, some who have been featured on shows such as “Platinum Weddings”, “Bridezilla”, “Whose Wedding Is It Anyway”, “Married Away”, and “Wedding Altered.”
Cost is $6 with online pre-registration or $8 at the door. University Club is at 175 N. Oakland Ave., Pasadena. Valet parking next to the club is available for $5.
Wonder if the dancers can do Billy Idol?

Putting ink to paper at the Pasadena Museum of California Art


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Los Angeles-based drawing collective Sumi Ink Club is in residency through the end of May in the Pasadena Museum of California Art’s Project Room. The club executes topsy-turvy, super-detailed, collaborative drawings using — what else? — ink on paper. Their group drawings are a true social gathering, playing off interactions that bleed into everyday life.
In their new installation for the PMCA, the artists hold weekly events to fill the room with their signature sumi ink drawings. The next gathering is scheduled for Sunday, Feb. 21, from 1 to 5 p.m., and visitors will be provided with a brush and ink to add their own flourishes to the walls.
The club welcomes the public — “all humans, all ages, all styles,” they say — to these drawing events.
Through May 30, Pasadena Museum of California Art, 490 E. Union St., (626) 568-3665, pmcaonline.org, sumiinkclub.com
The photos, at top and below, are from the Sumi Ink Club Web site, where they’ve documented some of the progress in the PMCA Project room.

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