Adopting a shelter animal? The ‘Dog Whisperer’ Cesar Millan has a few tips for you



45086-RBLOG-CESAR-MAINDISPLAY.jpg

39793-RBLOG-THINK-SECTIONHEADER.jpg
45084-RBLOG-CESAR-QUOTE.jpg
By Catherine Gaugh
So you are heading to the Pasadena Humane Society shelter to find a new friend and companion. 
The experience can be so nerve-racking and sad: so many dogs, so many sad eyes, so much barking. Most of the time, you don’t know where they came from nor why they wound up in the shelter.
What if you make a mistake and pick the wrong dog?
Take a few tips from Cesar Millan, the dog trainer extraordinaire and star of the National Geographic Channel’s “Dog Whisperer,” who suggests five ways to make sure you choose the right shelter pet for you.

Continue reading

Week in science: Hubble telescope celebrates 20 years | Spitzer ‘tastes’ a methane-free planetary puzzler | Adoptive parents bring biases to process

40021-RBLOG-ROUNDUP-HUBBLE.jpg
  • 39793-RBLOG-THINK-SECTIONHEADER.jpg

    The Hubble Space Telescope is celebrating its 20th anniversary. In the spirit of the occasion, the famous telescope has captured this phantasmagorical image deep within the Carina Nebula. Not too shabby for a telescope with two decades under its belt. NASA and the Hubble 20th Anniversary Team describe it best: “This craggy fantasy mountaintop enshrouded by wispy clouds looks like a bizarre landscape from Tolkien’s ‘The Lord of the Rings’ or a Dr. Seuss book, depending on your imagination. The NASA Hubble Space Telescope image, which is even more dramatic than fiction, captures the chaotic activity atop a three-light-year-tall pillar of gas and dust that is being eaten away by the brilliant light from nearby bright stars. The pillar is also being assaulted from within, as infant stars buried inside it fire off jets of gas that can be seen streaming from towering peaks.” [NASA and Discovery News]

Image: Hubble’s Wide Field Camera 3 observed the pillar of gas and dust within the Carina Nebula, 7,500 light-years away in the southern constellation Carina. (NASA, ESA, and M. Livio and the Hubble 20th Anniversary Team)

Continue reading