Pasadena designers behind Rodarte created scene-setting costumes for ‘Black Swan’

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If you’re paying even a modicum of attention to the Hollywood awards season, you may have heard of a little film called “Black Swan.” Actress Natalie Portman is knee-deep in praise and various honorary statuettes for her lead performance in the movie. 
Pasadena sisters Kate and Laura Mulleavy — the design forces behind Rodarte —  have also received many accolades for producing some of the film’s most notable costume designs.
At left, that’s Kate and Laura Mulleavy with Portman at a “Black Swan” screening in November.
They created 40 different costume pieces for “Black Swan,” from the main character’s featured ensembles down to her knitwear. (The Mulleavys were ineligible for a formal Oscar nod, because they weren’t credited in the film and weren’t members of the Costume Designers Guild at the time.)
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Laura Mulleavy said in an interview with Women’s Wear Daily that one artistic influence was Edgar Degas’ bronze ballerina.
“We always loved the distressed skirt,” she told WWD.
And, Pasadenans can get a firsthand view of the Degas sculpture, “Little Dancer, Aged Fourteen,” 1878-81, on display at the Norton Simon Museum. (Seen at right, in a file photo courtesy of the museum.)
It’s not the first time the sisters have drawn inspiration from local museums and culture. They have before cited such iconic Pasadena institutions as the Norton Simon, The Huntington and even The Raymond as personal favorites.
See some of the Mulleavys’ “Black Swan” sketches after the jump:


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‘Beauty and Power’: Rare bronze statuettes on display at Huntington Library

 
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Bronze sculpture is one figurative art form that lends itself most naturally to raw renderings of human emotion. The deep, lustrous metal alloy has a range of surface qualities that, in the hands of a capable sculptor, can be used to express vivid pathos.
Just take a look at these powerful photos of some of the 28 bronze statuettes that comprise “Beauty and Power,” a new exhibition at the Huntington Library.
Visitors to the exhibit are getting a rare look at Renaissance and Baroque bronzes from the private collection of New York architect Peter Marino.
Originating from Italy, France, Germany and the Netherlands, the bronzes date back to between 1500 and the mid-18th century.
The exhibition opened at the Wallace Collection in London in April. Before that, most of the works never had been on public view.
The Huntington is the first venue in the exhibit’s U.S. tour.
On display through Jan. 24, 2011. MaryLou and George Boone Gallery at The Huntington, 1151 Oxford Rd., San Marino. (626) 405-2100, huntington.org
More photos after the jump:

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