Pasadena area real-estate and development roundup

>>LIVE

We’re playing catch-up around here, since we were working around the clock to get our winter edition of the Rose Magazine to press.

Here’s what’s been happening recently on the Pasadena real-estate scene:

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    Private, all-girls Westridge School is expanding with a new science building that will be LEED-certified [pictured / via Brigham Yen]

  • Across the street from the future mixed-use Playhouse Plaza, a bridal shop has moved into the corner of Colorado and El Molino [via Brigham Yen]

  • Brigham Yen scores a closer look at the Westgate Apartments. The first phase opened up last month, with about 29 units ready for move-in [via Brigham Yen and CurbedLA]

  • The new building on Raymond Avenue that will become the future home of KPCC radio is coming along [via Brigham Yen]

Residential real-estate highlights via BlockShopper Los Angeles:

  • Children’s educational materials professional has listed for sale a six-bedroom, seven-bath home in Pasadena for $2.8 million

(Rendering via Brigham Yen)

That’s genius: Caltech’s John Dabiri tells us why you should care about a brainless, boneless creature

>>THINK

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Rose Magazine cover subject John Dabiri is only 29, and he’s already racking up serious accolades, like this one from the White House, for his research on jellyfish. Dabiri isn’t a biologist — he’s an associate professor of aeronautics at Caltech, where he and his team study the movement of jellies for inspiration that has some surprising potential to change the way we live.

If you think the 650-million-year-old creatures only matter when they’ve got their stinging tentacles wrapped around your leg, Dabiri’s research would solidly suggest otherwise.

His analysis on the way creatures swim, pump and propel themselves underwater includes human-oriented applications in:

  • Underwater vehicles, particularly military uses
  • Wind energy and how it is harnessed
  • Mass mixing and movement of the oceans, connected to climate change
  • Human heart diagnostics, with potential for treating heart disease

Visit the Caltech Biological Propulsion Laboratory Web site to see some of the research tools that allow Dabiri and team to study jellyfish, both in the lab and out in the ocean, including a 40-meter tilting water channel (that generates waves) and some really fancy underwater camera and laser systems.

The animation below, courtesy of Dabiri, shows the movement and forces of water created by a moon jellyfish as it interacts with the ocean around it. (Photo above by Walt Mancini / Staff)

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