‘Beauty and Power’: Rare bronze statuettes on display at Huntington Library

 
47395-RBLOG-BEAUTYPOWER5.jpg
39797-RBLOG-GO-SECTIONHEADER.jpg
47426-RBLOG-BEAUTYPOWER2-thumb-300x400-47392.jpg
Bronze sculpture is one figurative art form that lends itself most naturally to raw renderings of human emotion. The deep, lustrous metal alloy has a range of surface qualities that, in the hands of a capable sculptor, can be used to express vivid pathos.
Just take a look at these powerful photos of some of the 28 bronze statuettes that comprise “Beauty and Power,” a new exhibition at the Huntington Library.
Visitors to the exhibit are getting a rare look at Renaissance and Baroque bronzes from the private collection of New York architect Peter Marino.
Originating from Italy, France, Germany and the Netherlands, the bronzes date back to between 1500 and the mid-18th century.
The exhibition opened at the Wallace Collection in London in April. Before that, most of the works never had been on public view.
The Huntington is the first venue in the exhibit’s U.S. tour.
On display through Jan. 24, 2011. MaryLou and George Boone Gallery at The Huntington, 1151 Oxford Rd., San Marino. (626) 405-2100, huntington.org
More photos after the jump:

Continue reading

Curious worlds apart: Dual exhibits at Art Center’s Williamson Gallery in Pasadena

41596-RBLOG-PRINTEDROSE-TOP-thumb-525x415-41595.jpg
39797-RBLOG-GO-SECTIONHEADER.jpg
The exhibitions are dual: One looking back at the fascinating domain of patent models in the 1800s, the other looking forward to the future of objects conceived on computers and sprouted up by machines. One revolution has already changed the world; the other soon will.
Image, at top: This printed rose began with a high-resolution scan of a real rose, and was then printed at Art Center on a 3D Systems’ V-Flash 3D Printer, in which a photo-polymer resin is cured by UV light, in micro-thin layers, each one four-thousandths of an inch thick. (Photo credit: Steven A. Heller / Art Center College of Design)

Continue reading

Design Revolution Road Show rolls through Art Center


37122-RBLOG-HIPPO2.jpg

>>THINK 

37120-RBLOG-HIPPO1.jpg

The Design Revolution Road Show that will be rolling through the Art Center College of Design campus on Monday has an agenda, and the 40 objects it’s bringing in tow help make a convincing case: good design solves problems.

There are solutions to first-world problems, like needing to sync your iPod with your workout. But there are also straws to purify polluted water as you drink it, sharp jewelry to punch would-be attackers and affordable, custom-fit eyeglasses that use liquid to bend light accordingly.

The photos are of Hippo Rollers, a water transport barrel for the developing world. The Hippo has a capacity of 24 gallons, and frees women and children from having to spend most of their days collecting water for their households.

The all-day exhibition takes place in a mobile, 1972 Airstream trailer, and visitors can experience, use and touch all of the products on display. In the evening, GOOD, Art Center’s Alumni Office and Designmatters present a celebration with food, drink, music, books and dialogue.

Monday, Feb. 8, noon-10 p.m., lecture at 1 p.m., evening reception at 6 p.m. Art Center College of Design at Ahmanson Auditorium, 1700 Lida St. designrevolutionroadshow.com

(Photos via Design Revolution Road Show)

Arcadia’s WWII history and the Santa Anita Assembly Center

34476-RBLOG-CARRY1.JPG

>>THINK

There’s a new exhibit at the Ruth and Charles Gilb Arcadia Historical Museum that offers up a dark and lesser-known side of the city’s past for examination.

In the 1940s, Arcadia’s Santa Anita Park was the location of a temporary assembly center for Japanese and Japanese Americans, before they were sent to live in internment camps throughout the United States during World War II.

Museum curator Dana Dunn told the Star-News: “You’d be surprised at how many people have no idea that this happened.” From the report by Michelle J. Mills:

Dunn read and was told in interviews that the camp was a clean, organized and a strict place to live. People were told to bring a coat and were allowed few possessions.

“They had the guards up in the towers with guns and barbed wire all around you. You can’t leave and you’re there in the summertime and there’s no insulation in the building,” Dunn said. …

“The one story I hear a lot is about the guards in the tower at night. If you wanted to get up and go to the bathroom, you could do that but the spotlight would hit you, and they’d follow you with the spotlight all the way to the bathroom. You’d go in the bathroom, and when you came out the spotlight was there, and they followed you all the way back,” Dunn said.

There was also an assembly center at Pomona’s Fairplex.

In the photo at top, a child arrives at the Santa Anita Assembly Center in Arcadia. More photos below.

An opening reception for the exhibit will be held tomorrow at 11 a.m. Osamu Miyamoto, Akkiko Nomura and other guests will speak on the Santa Anita Assembly Center.

“Only What We Could Carry: The Santa Anita Assembly Center” runs through Jan. 16. 10 a.m.-4 p.m Tuesday-Saturday. Closed on holidays. Open 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Dec. 24 and 31. 380 W. Huntington Drive in Arcadia. Admission is free.

Japanese Americans read a poster ordering them to prepare
to be sent to assembly centers across the United States.
34477-RBLOG-CARRY2.JPG
A train leaves the Santa Anita Assembly Center in Arcadia,
headed for one of the relocation centers in the United States.
34478-RBLOG-CARRY3.JPG

(Photos courtesy the Arcadia Historical Museum)

Have you met the Comtesse?

>>GO

34101-RBLOG-COMTESSE.jpg

KCRW’s resident art critic and one-time teacher at Art Center College of Design, Edward Goldman, went on the air yesterday to introduce an esteemed lady friend to Southern Californians.

She is the alluring Comtesse d’ Haussonville — captured for the ages by French painter Jean Auguste Dominique Ingres.

Goldman has called upon the Comtesse before, in her stately home on the Upper East Side. But even ladies must travel from time to time.

The Comtesse d’ Haussonville is the first loan in a new art-exchange
program between Fifth Avenue’s The Frick Collection and our very own
Norton Simon.

How did the travel — the change of scenery — suit the Comtesse?

“I went on Saturday … wanting to see if here, under the California sun, I would learn something new about her.”

Here’s what he discovered.

The Comtesse is visiting through Jan. 25.