Focusing on fashion illustration at Gallery Nucleus in Alhambra


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Sunday’s Star-News carried a story on the Gallery Nucleus fashion illustration exhibition we recommended recently in our weekend guide.
Caroline An reports:
Twenty-five artists from Europe, South America, Asia and Pasadena are represented in the exhibit … Just as varied as the artists’ backgrounds and experiences are the different media hung on the walls — from paint to watercolor to ink to textiles.
The artists have worked with top fashion designers, including Dior, Jean Paul Gaultier and Marc Jacobs. Their works have been published in high-end publications such as Vogue, Elle and Nylon.
“We wanted to get a basic consensus of where contemporary fashion illustration is currently at,” (Nucleus’ director Wade) Buchanan said.
More photos and exhibit details, after the jump.

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Weekend guide: Sew contemporary, spring festivals blossoming and a sweet pairing menu


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SATURDAY, April 10, & SUNDAY, April 11


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    “Stitches”

A group exhibition at the Armory Center for the Arts opening Saturday will have you bobbin and weaving. Curated by Sinead Finnerty-Pyne, “Stitches” highlights 12 culturally diverse artists who approach craft, textile and fiber art in an unconventional manner. In a versatile — and sometimes obsessive — art form, the works use materials ranging from yarn and thread, to found objects and recycled clothing. Contemporary artworks approach the homespun techniques of sewing, knitting and weaving, including two-dimensional and freestanding sculptural works, along with large-scale installations.

Opening reception Saturday, 7 p.m.-9 p.m. Suggested donation, $5. Runs through June 6. Hours: Tuesday-Sunday, noon-5 p.m. Caldwell Gallery at the Armory Center for the Arts, 145 N. Raymond Ave. 626-792-5101, armoryarts.org

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Meet the Rose Magazine cover artist: Zack Morrissette

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>>INSIDER

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Theater marquee, below, and comic work, above, by artist Zack Morrissette.


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Los-Angeles based artist and designer Zack Morrissette created the Rose Magazine cover look, based on a photo shoot of Caltech’s John Dabiri, as captured by staff photographer Walt Mancini.

Morrissette has been working in the L.A. art and design scene since 1996 in a variety of mediums and styles — charcoal, watercolor, acrylic, pastel, ink and computer graphics, among them.

He studied at Skidmore College in Saratoga Springs, New York.

At right, you can see the original photo shot by Mancini and, below that, how Morrissette transformed the image for the cover. The graphic design in the background blends inspiration from both Leonardo da Vinci’s “Vitruvian Man” and Dabiri’s scholarly research on jellyfish.

(Read more about our cover story.)

At bottom right is an alternate watercolor painting version of the cover art, also handcrafted by Morrissette.

The artist specializes in comic design, and some pieces from his portfolio are displayed at the top of this page.

Visit Morrissette’s Web site to see more work by the Rose Magazine cover artist.

Top right photo by Walt Mancini/Staff
All others courtesy Zack Morrissette/Contributor

Promise of creation at Art Center’s summer graduation showcase

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(Above, photo courtesy Crystal Jean Photography / Art Center College of Design (c) 2009)

Last week we attended the Thursday-night graduation show preview at Art Center College of Design to get a glimpse of some of the work being produced by a slew of summer graduates. (The actual graduation ceremony was on Saturday.)

The massive showcase was held on Art Center’s Hillside Campus and featured displays from each field of study at the design school.

We culled just a handful of the highlights from Art Center’s hallways and showrooms, every square inch of which were wallpapered with student work, promising and advanced.

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Strother has exhibited his work at Alhambra’s Nucleus Art Gallery, Pasadena Central Library and L.A.’s Ghettogloss.

His brilliantly colorized figures remind us of muecas quitapenas, but in Strother’s works the color comes, most of the time, from without.

Engaging African and Afro-American iconography and boilerplate notions in miniaturized detail, Strother’s forms are mesmerizing.

(Right, top) “Tear Down the Dancehall,” 2009, gouache, acrylic, Cel-Vinyl and silkscreen on cut paper

(Right, bottom) “Please Don’t Tear Down the Dancehall,” 2009

(Images courtesy of Devin Troy Strother)

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A skilled portraitist and illustrator, Davison’s work conveys complex ideas as radically simple visual statements.

Illustration, at right, illuminating the inflating value of the American college degree. At far right, Davison’s illustration explores the notion that people are increasingly turning to the Internet and technology as substitutes for meaningful human relationships.

Also check out Davison’s blog.

(Images courtesy of Eric Davison)

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  • Kelly Ahn

Ahn’s contemporary character designs and background illustrations blend the flavors of Tim Burton and “Alice in Wonderland” with a “Coraline” aesthetic; her work tastes to us like a colorful sweet-and-sour swirl.

At right, “Wicked Cat,” part of a clay animation project. See more on Ahn’s blog.

(Photo by Evelyn Barge)



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  • Rawn Trinidad

Trinidad was part of the award-winning Designmatters creative team that in May was honored with the Corbis Creativity for Social Justice Award & Scholarship, part of
the ADC 88th Annual Awards program recognizing the best in advertising
and design from around the world. See the Art Center team’s entry here.

At right, part of Trinidad’s graduation show display. Our take: Cube World meets Tokidoki.

(Photo by Evelyn Barge)

Levy’s sustainable tea-drinking device turns the concept of enjoying a cuppa on its head.

The single-serving Moietea uses just enough water and electricity to create the perfect serving, while wasting not — and wanting not.

The idea appeals to us, and not just because we’re known to suck down several cups of ginseng oolong in a handful of writing hours.

The green movement is becoming an economic powerhouse; There’s definitely a market for this product. We can already imagine the Ikea packaging.

(Photo courtesy of Sharon Isadora Levy)