Treasures under a Majestical Roof in Pasadena

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A hidden treasure in Pasadena, The Majestical Roof is not easy to find: Follow a sign off Fair Oaks Avenue, down a brick-road tunnel and into a quiet courtyard, where the boutique is tucked away on one side.

The boutique sells an eclectic mix of products, from handmade soaps to vintage wear to mix media art pieces. There are cutesy, awkward mutant doll from The Cinnamon Roll Gang collection and children’s toy boxes, alongside vintage jewelry pieces, like chandelier earrings revamped into cocktail rings.
The Majestical Roof has also become a venue for more than 100 artists to build their reputation and sell their work.
Read more by reporter Stacey Wang in Rose Magazine.
More photos after the jump:

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Botanical jewelry at Saturday’s Art on Palm showcase in Altadena

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Altadena jewelry maker Ellen Dinerman will be part of Sunday’s Art on Palm showcase, featuring ceramics, glass, textiles, painting, collage, woodworking, photography and jewelry by 30 local artists and designers.
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Dinerman’s work has roots in nature: Many of her pieces are inspired by the natural world, refashioned in silver or brass and accented by stones and beads.
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She told Michelle Mills of the Star-News: “Sometimes I see something and I think, ‘What a fabulous shape!’ and I can see how it would be an interesting shape translated into another material. Then I take the actual seed and make a mold of it.”
Dinerman is also a featured jewelry designer for the Los Angeles County Arboretum and Botanic Garden, where her organic-inspired designs feel, well, natural.
Visit ellendinerman.com and shop online at etsy.com
More photos after the jump.

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Shop the block: Il Teatro, 54 S. De Lacey Ave.

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>>SHOP

Skip the chaos of retail on Colorado Boulevard (you know, the hordes descending on H&M and Forever 21).

A little off the beaten path, but not too far, and directly across from the De Lacey parking garage is Il Teatro, which is not a shop for opera glasses, but rather an exquisite women’s clothing and accessories boutique.

Stock up on wardrobe staples or add some sparkle a la bohme to your special occasion.

You’ll do it all without busting through the budget you’d normally keep at those other warehouse-esque stores.

54 S. De Lacey Ave. 626-796-2313


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(Photos by Walt Mancini / Staff)

Shop the block: Onesipkim, 110 W. Green St.


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Onesipkim owner Kim Madolora’s wares speak boldly for themselves in a shop with clean design, gentle pops of color and spacial harmony.
You’ll find worthy picks from Rachel Pally, Ella Moss, Andrea Brueckner, Trovata and more.
110 W. Green St., Mon.-Sat., 11 a.m.-7 p.m.; Sun., noon-5 p.m., 626-396-4926, onesipkim.com

(Photos by Walt Mancini / Staff)


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Pop-up retro shop featuring Elisa B. and Wasabi jewelry disappears Jan. 10

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Fashion maven Elisa Bruley — that’s Elisa B., of course — teamed up with jewelry designer Jill Pearson to transform a 1,400-square-foot space into a retro winter pop-up shop.

The temporary store features new looks from Wasabi (Pearson’s line), repurposed vintage jewelry, collectibles and accessory lines. Some items are one-of-a-kind.

Pearson combines vintage costume jewelry with semi-precious stones, sterling silver and gold-filled chains.

More than two dozen pieces from her collection, culled from items at estate sales, thrift stores and the Rose Bowl Flea Market, are up for sale at the annex. (No word on how many are left.)

Pearson calls the space mid-century modern meets thrift-store chic.

24 Smith Alley, off One Colorado courtyard. Mon.-Sat., 11 a.m.-8 p.m.; Sun., noon-7 p.m. Through Jan. 10. (626) 793-7584


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(Photos by Sarah Reingewirtz / Staff)

Jewelry box: Rose Queen crowns through history

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Natalie
Innocenzi of Arcadia was crowned today as the
92nd Rose Queen.

Her Mikimoto crown, set in silver, features 10 white
South Sea pearls, 632 Akoya cultured pearls and 6.09 carats in diamonds. It’s estimated to be worth more than $100,000.

This crown was introduced for the 2005 parade, and it was the first to be made of truly precious materials. Before that, it was a lot of faux glitz.

Let’s walk through some of the headpieces bestowed on Rose Queens in days of yore.

This crown, below, was commissioned for the 75th Rose Parade in 1993. It’s described in a 2004 story from the Star-News archives as “a
large and looping number … that’s decorated with dozens of fake diamonds.”

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The crown, below, was only worn by one Rose Queen, Linda Strother, in 1968. A new crown took its place the next year.

In 1997 — and now Linda Strother McKnight — she gave an interview to the Los Angeles Daily News. She talked about how the tumultuous era eclipsed the glamour and pageantry: “In 1968, the most important thing was dealing with social unrest and the war in Vietnam. So why would anyone do anything so shallow as be a Rose Queen?”

Interestingly enough, during her years as a college student at Berkeley, she wrote her senior sociology thesis introducing a feminist critique on the institution of Rose Queen, she told the Star-News in 2002.

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The Art-Deco-explosion crown below was actually worn from 1954-1967.
 

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From 1940-1953, 14 queens rode down Colorado Boulevard wearing the crown below. The first was Margaret Huntley Main, the oldest living Rose Queen.

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During part of the 1930s, the Rose Queen’s crown was formed from a collection of bracelets and broaches. They were fashioned to fit together like a puzzle. After the parade, the pieces became mementos, inscribed with the queen’s or princess’s name, that they took home with them. This piece, below, belonged to Queen Barbara Dougall in 1939, as you can see from the engraving on the back.

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The front of some individual jewelry pieces that were once part of a whole crown. The 1939 Royal Court returned their pieces, so the Tournament would be able to display a whole collection.

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Below, what the crown may have looked like when assembled in ’39.

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And matching earrings! Today, each member of the Rose Court gets a pearl necklace and earrings from Mikimoto.

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(From file photos and staff archives)

Pasadena philanthropist continues ‘Power of Pink’ breast-cancer campaign

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It’s National Breast Cancer Awareness Month, and a Pasadena philanthropist is continuing his company’s annual fundraising campaign.

Through Oct. 31, Brighton Collectibles — owned by Pasadena resident Jerry Kohl — will donate $5 to breast-cancer foundations for each piece sold from its limited edition “Power of Pink” line.

It’s always nice to get something when you give. And this way, you can wear your heart on your sleeve — or your wrist, as it were, with this little number to the right.

Some of the 142 Brighton stores are matching the donation; Ask ahead of time if you’re thinking about purchasing, and that will boost the donation amount to $10.

The company has raised more than $3 million for breast-cancer research since its first “Power of Pink” campaign in 2003. Funds have gone to The Breast Cancer Research Foundation, City of Hope Cancer Center, Concern Foundation and the Susan G. Komen Foundation.

Shop local:

  • Brighton Collectibles, 340 E Colorado Blvd. #110, Pasadena (626) 577-3849
  • Huntington Hospital Gift Shop, 801 S. Fairmont Ave., Pasadena (626) 397-5257