Examining ‘The Arrangement’ behind the art at One Colorado in Pasadena

 
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When you look at a piece of art, what do you see?

Maybe you stand away from the work and admire its shape and form. Maybe you move closer and focus in on brush strokes or chisel markings, the movements that betray its creation.

But what if the work itself was invisible? When, then, would remain?

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New to The Artist Studio at One Colorado is Carly Steward, who deconstructs “The Arrangement” and puts the unseen elements of an art exhibition under examination.

They are the pieces that hold it all together. (Our staff writer Stacey Wang describes them as “the supporting cast” in the art world.)
“Take away the artwork from a museum exhibit and you’re left with reminders of what was once there — a pedestal, some wood covered in fabric, maybe a metal prong,” Wang writes.

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Weekend guide: Sew contemporary, spring festivals blossoming and a sweet pairing menu


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SATURDAY, April 10, & SUNDAY, April 11


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    “Stitches”

A group exhibition at the Armory Center for the Arts opening Saturday will have you bobbin and weaving. Curated by Sinead Finnerty-Pyne, “Stitches” highlights 12 culturally diverse artists who approach craft, textile and fiber art in an unconventional manner. In a versatile — and sometimes obsessive — art form, the works use materials ranging from yarn and thread, to found objects and recycled clothing. Contemporary artworks approach the homespun techniques of sewing, knitting and weaving, including two-dimensional and freestanding sculptural works, along with large-scale installations.

Opening reception Saturday, 7 p.m.-9 p.m. Suggested donation, $5. Runs through June 6. Hours: Tuesday-Sunday, noon-5 p.m. Caldwell Gallery at the Armory Center for the Arts, 145 N. Raymond Ave. 626-792-5101, armoryarts.org

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Pop-up retro shop featuring Elisa B. and Wasabi jewelry disappears Jan. 10

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Fashion maven Elisa Bruley — that’s Elisa B., of course — teamed up with jewelry designer Jill Pearson to transform a 1,400-square-foot space into a retro winter pop-up shop.

The temporary store features new looks from Wasabi (Pearson’s line), repurposed vintage jewelry, collectibles and accessory lines. Some items are one-of-a-kind.

Pearson combines vintage costume jewelry with semi-precious stones, sterling silver and gold-filled chains.

More than two dozen pieces from her collection, culled from items at estate sales, thrift stores and the Rose Bowl Flea Market, are up for sale at the annex. (No word on how many are left.)

Pearson calls the space mid-century modern meets thrift-store chic.

24 Smith Alley, off One Colorado courtyard. Mon.-Sat., 11 a.m.-8 p.m.; Sun., noon-7 p.m. Through Jan. 10. (626) 793-7584


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(Photos by Sarah Reingewirtz / Staff)

Jumping Jellyfish children’s boutique makes the leap to One Colorado

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Jumping Jellyfish is featured in our fall issue, and, as of press time for the magazine, the children’s boutique was nearing a transition from its shop on Fair Oaks up to the One Colorado complex. Well, the leap has leapt. The new address is below.

Above and below, check out some of the achingly adorable finds you’ll be able to nab there. It’s sugar, spice, everything nice. (The photos were taken at the former location.)

34 Hugus Alley, One Colorado
(626) 578-1838
www.jumpingjellyfishkids.com

Follow Jumping Jellyfish on Twitter.

(Photos by Keith Birmingham)

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24-hour art: Daniel Buren’s ‘A Rainbow in the Sky’ at shifting One Colorado in Pasadena

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Another large-scale public art installation is on display in the One Colorado Courtyard, and it is already garnering a lot of attention from the media and public since it went on display over the weekend.

The installation is presented by One Colorado, Armory
Center for the Arts
, and FLAX, a Los Angeles-based foundation
dedicated to fostering a cultural exchange with France
through the arts.

“A Rainbow in the Sky” is the second display in that space for French contemporary Daniel Buren. (The installation follows his 2007 work “A Colored Square in the Sky.”)

In between the Buren displays, the courtyard was home to Yoko Ono’s equally popular and interactive “Wish Trees” in 2008.


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There’s a lot of change going on in the One Colorado complex right now, with a couple arts projects taking up residence there and general retail fluctuations. The old Gordon Biersch is still vacant, but several new stores — including Dot’s Cupcakes and Jumping Jellyfish — are moving into the complex.

You can get a sense of the transition in the photo at right. Shadows from the “Rainbow” installation dance on the ground, while construction crews work on the Gold Class Cinemas that is expected to open in December.

(Photos by Walt Mancini)

Weekend guide: Demonic presence, some Serendipity, a semi-permanent rainbow and TRAFFIC!

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  • FRIDAY, noon-9 p.m. (opening, on display through March 8)

“Divine Demons: Wrathful Deities of Buddhist Art,” Norton Simon Museum

You won’t want to rub these Buddha bellies. Opening at the Norton Simon Museum is “Divine Demons: Wrathful Deities of Buddhist Art,” a contrast to the smiling Buddhas and serene enlightened beings in the museum’s collection. These figures — many of them baring fangs, drinking blood, or wearing garlands of severed heads — represent the “demonic divine,” protectors of the Buddhist faith. There are 18 paintings, sculptures and ceremonial objects from the Norton Simon permanent collection in this intimate exhibition.
Museum is open every day except Tuesday, from noon to 6 p.m., and noon to 9 p.m. Fridays.
General admission, $8; Seniors, $4
411 W. Colorado Blvd.
(626) 796-4978
www.nortonsimon.org

  • FRIDAY and SATURDAY, 8 p.m.

Serendipity, Madera Design House, downtown L.A.

Serendipity (pictured) promises to be the least stuffy of garden parties, with live installations, aerial artists, dancers and stilt walkers. To boot, it’s a choose-your-own-adventure: Interact and write your night’s story with a collection of characters and creatures with whom to play. The open invitation comes with this curious caveat: “Once you purchase your tickets, you will receive information on location and dress code.” Oh, how we love a good mystery.
Admission: $30; two for $50. Cash bar.
Information and tickets: www.treetopproductions.org

  • SATURDAY (opening, on display through Nov. 15)

“A Rainbow in the Sky,” One Colorado Courtyard

Artist Daniel Buren returns to Pasadena with a large-scale site-specific art installation consisting of 2,268 colorful, striped flags suspended over the pedestrian square. The flags move with the breeze, casting thousands of moving shadows on the courtyard below.  Best of all, viewing the display is free. Just show up.
Located between Fair Oaks, Colorado Boulevard, Union Street, and Delacey in Old Pasadena.
www.armoryarts.org

  • SATURDAY, 3-4 p.m.

Benny Chan talks about “TRAFFIC!”, Pasadena Museum of California Art

The museum hosts an artist talk with Benny Chan, who doesn’t photograph anything you’ve never seen in Southern California (got that?). He’s an architectural photographer who shoots airports, parking garages and, in his exhibit “Traffic,” aerial shots of rush-hour traffic. Chan designed a camera to capture gridlock especially for the series at the Pasadena Museum of California Art. His geometric compositions hint at the darker side of those constructions, like the loneliness of a laundromat or the chaos of our traffic system. Chan captures the beauty and monstrosity of curlicues in an interchange — in a way Google Earth never has.
490 E. Union Street
Free with admission.
(626) 568-3665, Ext. 17
www.pmcaonline.org

(Photos courtesy Treetop Productions/Serendipity)