Make a day of it: 3 visit-worthy exhibitions at the Pasadena Museum of California Art

 
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Gardens and Grandeur: Porcelains and Paintings by Franz A. Bischoff
In the Main Gallery; Runs through March 20, 2011

For his masterful rendering of dynamic flowers, Austria-born painter and porcelain decorator Franz A. Bischoff earned the nickname “King of the Rose Painters.” The Pasadena Museum of California Art will present the most inclusive retrospective of Bischoff’s work to date, with highlights from his early ceramic work and his later practice on canvas. Bischoff immigrated to New York in 1885 and lived in different U.S. cities before settling in Pasadena in 1906. It was in California that the artist turned to landscape paintings and the plein-air style, painting the state’s signature sun-kissed shore and mountain vistas.
[Photos: At top, Bischoff's "Afternoon Idyll, Cambria" c. 1922. At left, Bischoff's "A Tapestry of Roses."]

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Have you met the Comtesse?

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KCRW’s resident art critic and one-time teacher at Art Center College of Design, Edward Goldman, went on the air yesterday to introduce an esteemed lady friend to Southern Californians.

She is the alluring Comtesse d’ Haussonville — captured for the ages by French painter Jean Auguste Dominique Ingres.

Goldman has called upon the Comtesse before, in her stately home on the Upper East Side. But even ladies must travel from time to time.

The Comtesse d’ Haussonville is the first loan in a new art-exchange
program between Fifth Avenue’s The Frick Collection and our very own
Norton Simon.

How did the travel — the change of scenery — suit the Comtesse?

“I went on Saturday … wanting to see if here, under the California sun, I would learn something new about her.”

Here’s what he discovered.

The Comtesse is visiting through Jan. 25.