Pictured: The bird is the word at Debs Park

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Over the weekend, the Cornell Lab of Ornithology and the National Audubon Society got together for a promotion of the annual Great Backyard Bird Count, which is crowdsourcing data about bird migrations and habitats. The Pasadena chapter of the Audubon Society checked in at Debs Park in Highland Park to count birds and glean information about the avian residents of the Arroyo Seco.
It was a birder’s binoculared love-fest and an opportunity for backyard researchers who are interested in finding out more about several species, including the California quail, Allen’s hummingbird, Nuttall’s woodpecker, the oak titmouse, the wrentit, the California thrasher, the yellow warbler and the spotted towhee.
Staff photographer Mike Mullen was at Debs Park, too, and caught the cool shot at the top. I call it “Out on a Limb.”
(Photos by Mike Mullen / Staff)

Solvent solutions: Restoring — or removing — graffiti-covered trail markers on historic Cobb Estate

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>>INSIDER

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The Sunday Star-News featured a front-page report by Janette Williams on the unsightly condition of interpretive trail markers on the Cobb Estate at the north end of Lake Avenue.

The Pasadena Audubon Society installed the signs about 18 months ago, and they’re already plastered in graffiti — so much as to be completely unreadable.

Above and at right are some of the images that didn’t run in Sunday’s newspaper.

As you can see, the graffiti extends beyond just the trail markers.

A local resident is spearheading the effort to eliminate the eyesores, but finding a solution for the marred signs hasn’t been a simple process:

For nearly a year, Sarah Keever has been trying to
find a clean-up solution, contacting both the Pasadena Audubon Society,
which installed the interpretive signs, and the U.S. Forest Service,
which was deeded the estate site by the Altadena community in the early
1970s.

If one of the groups — or any willing group, for that matter — decides to buck up and take responsibility for the signage, we hear Easy-Off can work miracles.

You might want to order in bulk.

(Photos by Walt Mancini / Staff)