Rose Magazine’s fall arts and culture issue on stands tomorrow

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Our fall arts and culture issue comes out tomorrow, and it’s packed with the best creative happenings of the season. Pick up a copy of the Star-News, and look for the magazine inside.
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Besides our regular shopping, event and book departments, feature stories in the new issue include:
  • Street fashion photography spread, shot on location at One Colorado
  • Coffee as art: An exploration of Pasadena’s top micro-roasters
  • Writer Lian Dolan chats about her first novel “Helen of Pasadena”
  • Gallery guide: Fall for the arts with top-notch exhibitions and events in November and December
If you subscribe to the Star-News, you’ll receive a copy with your regular delivery.

We’ll also post the digital edition here, so check back starting tomorrow for lots of online exclusives like photo galleries and extra content.

(Cover photo by Watchara Phomicinda / Staff)

Video: Behind the scenes of the latest cover shoot for Pasadena’s Rose Magazine

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Pet-crazy is one way to describe our team as we planned for the cover of the latest issue of Rose Magazine.
The little guy you see in the video is Oscar, a Yorkshire Maltese, and he’s showing off his stuff with owner, Sofia Gonzalez.

Oscar is very tiny, which means he was a perfect fit for our crowded and hectic photo studio. Oscar was also kind enough to let us surround him with girly, pink, glittering pet accessories, even though he is decidedly a boy pup.

The bag you see featured on the cover is an original dog carrier designed and sold by The Shabby Dog, a local company based out of an adorable bungalow in Sierra Madre. All the accessories and dog carriers in the video are Shabby Dog products, and we were lucky to work with stylist Ronnie Grinie.
Sofia’s wardrobe includes a pink ruffled shoulder dress by Milly and a pin dot-textured spaghetti-strap dress by Rebecca Taylor.

Behind the scenes: Rose Magazine cover shoot


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>>INSIDER 
For our February issue on health and wellness (with a pinch of Valentine’s Day), we worked with staff photographer Watchara Phomicinda to create this blissful cover look.

Lots more photos after the jump.

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Festival of Brides: The Upscale Bridal Show

>>GO 

The Festival of Brides, Upscale Bridal Show made its tenth appearance at The Langham, Huntington in Pasadena this last Sunday — and it was an afternoon to remember.

Being a fairly new bride-to-be, I’ve only been to one other bridal show, but as I entered the Huntington Ballroom at the Langham on Sunday, I could easily see why there was such a steep entrance fee ($35).

These beautiful displays by Luna Party Rentals provided some of the decorative and lighting displays in the foyer entrance to the ballroom.


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Between takes at the Rose Court photo shoot

>>PARADE

The Rose Court: They’re just like us — except royal.

Princess June says, “I’m sort of a joker. … And it’s great that everyone else on the court is like that, so we have great interaction with each other. Michelle, especially — we like to make creepy faces at each other.”

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On her family, Princess Kinsey says, “They kind of make fun of me … especially my grandmother. She says, ‘Even though you’re a princess, you’re still under my roof, and I’m the queen bee.’”

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Queen Natalie is actually the youngest court member. “All the girls are like my big sisters and my moms,” she says. “They help me with everything.”

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Princess Lauren shares the court’s strategy for dealing with stage fright: “We recently learned with our speech training that you can breathe through a straw to calm you down. Before the President’s Dinner, when all the court was presented for the first time, all the girls were doing a breathing exercise with the straws.”

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Princess Ashley says, “I love to read. When I was little, when I’d get into trouble, I’d have to go to my room, and I wouldn’t be allowed to read — that was my punishment. I had to sit and do nothing.”

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Princess Katherine says, “Princesses like to eat as much as anybody else. … We can be tired after a long day of training, but the second anybody mentions food, everyone lightens up.”
 

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Of the creepy faces, as demonstrated below, Princess Michelle says, “June started it.”

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(Photos by Watchara Phomicinda / Staff)

Femme Royale: Extras from the Rose Court photo shoot

>>PARADE

From our photo session with the Royal Court, here’s some shots that didn’t make it into the magazine.

Princess Ashley Thaxton
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Princess Kinsey Stuart
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Princess Katherine Hernandez
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Princess June Ko
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Princess Michelle Van Wyk
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Queen Natalie Innocenzi
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Princess Lauren Rogers
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(Photos by Watchara Phomicinda / Staff)

J’adore noir: Rose Queen and Court in black and white

>>PARADE

Check out our noir-style editorial spread with the 2010 Rose Queen and Royal Court at Pasadena Central Library. Use the arrows in the embedded object, below, to navigate through the photos.

We’ll have more from this photo shoot, including some fun outtakes, tomorrow.

Arcadia’s WWII history and the Santa Anita Assembly Center

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>>THINK

There’s a new exhibit at the Ruth and Charles Gilb Arcadia Historical Museum that offers up a dark and lesser-known side of the city’s past for examination.

In the 1940s, Arcadia’s Santa Anita Park was the location of a temporary assembly center for Japanese and Japanese Americans, before they were sent to live in internment camps throughout the United States during World War II.

Museum curator Dana Dunn told the Star-News: “You’d be surprised at how many people have no idea that this happened.” From the report by Michelle J. Mills:

Dunn read and was told in interviews that the camp was a clean, organized and a strict place to live. People were told to bring a coat and were allowed few possessions.

“They had the guards up in the towers with guns and barbed wire all around you. You can’t leave and you’re there in the summertime and there’s no insulation in the building,” Dunn said. …

“The one story I hear a lot is about the guards in the tower at night. If you wanted to get up and go to the bathroom, you could do that but the spotlight would hit you, and they’d follow you with the spotlight all the way to the bathroom. You’d go in the bathroom, and when you came out the spotlight was there, and they followed you all the way back,” Dunn said.

There was also an assembly center at Pomona’s Fairplex.

In the photo at top, a child arrives at the Santa Anita Assembly Center in Arcadia. More photos below.

An opening reception for the exhibit will be held tomorrow at 11 a.m. Osamu Miyamoto, Akkiko Nomura and other guests will speak on the Santa Anita Assembly Center.

“Only What We Could Carry: The Santa Anita Assembly Center” runs through Jan. 16. 10 a.m.-4 p.m Tuesday-Saturday. Closed on holidays. Open 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Dec. 24 and 31. 380 W. Huntington Drive in Arcadia. Admission is free.

Japanese Americans read a poster ordering them to prepare
to be sent to assembly centers across the United States.
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A train leaves the Santa Anita Assembly Center in Arcadia,
headed for one of the relocation centers in the United States.
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(Photos courtesy the Arcadia Historical Museum)