Photo gallery: Rodarte Fall 2010 collection


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>>SHOP 
Pasadena’s own denizens Laura and Kate Mulleavy came out strong at New York Fashion Week this morning in Rodarte‘s fall 2010 collection, worthy of an ethereal ghost bride with a penchant for neutrals, lace and a touch of pearls.
Still present were their bold textures and patchwork layering, but the muted color palette put a dreamlike haze over the affair. Where before their designs were almost tribal, that quality was overtaken by a spectral, romantic glow.
The Mulleavys have said they were inspired, among other things, by the notion of sleepwalking.

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Royal treatment: The Rose Court gets ready for a photo shoot

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>>PARADE

By Stacey Wang

To teach the queen and princesses of the Rose Parade how to give their
faces the royal treatment, Lancome spent a day with the teens to show
them the how-tos of wearing makeup.

Each received a makeover, a cosmetics bag of essentials and instructions on how to duplicate their looks.

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Equipped
with new angle brushes, eyeliner and other effects, the court members
try to recreate their looks at the Tournament House before a photo
shoot — some more successfully on their own than others.

“The most important tip to take to heart is that less is more in some
cases,” says Princess June Ko as she puts on her makeup for the first time.

Ko
learns the meaning of her words firsthand as she examines her work.
With a cry for help, she stares at a girl with a black eye: She had
applied too much eye shadow.

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Michelle Van Wyk, a ballet dancer since she was 3 years old, is one of the more experienced girls when it comes to cosmetics.

“I wasn’t one of those girls who wore it every day, but it was fun for dress-up,” she says. Among her makeup tips, facial preparation is crucial.

“It’s really important to prep your face. Moisturizer is important,” the 17-year-old says.

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Ashley Thaxton, 17, is also one whom the rest look to for guidance.
Even though she rarely wears makeup, she’s had 10 years of practice in
front of the mirror.

Her cosmetic tip: “Toilet seat covers make very good blotters,” Thaxton says.

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Sitting on the floor near a window, Katherine Hernndez drops her hands
in frustration while another princess comes to her rescue.

“My face looks dirty,” Hernndez exclaims. “This looks ridiculous.”

The
18-year-old’s mother had previously tried to teach her how to apply
makeup, but for the girl who grew up with two older brothers, the
process was still baffling.

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(Photos by Sarah Reingewirtz / Staff)

Jewelry box: Rose Queen crowns through history

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>>INSIDER

Natalie
Innocenzi of Arcadia was crowned today as the
92nd Rose Queen.

Her Mikimoto crown, set in silver, features 10 white
South Sea pearls, 632 Akoya cultured pearls and 6.09 carats in diamonds. It’s estimated to be worth more than $100,000.

This crown was introduced for the 2005 parade, and it was the first to be made of truly precious materials. Before that, it was a lot of faux glitz.

Let’s walk through some of the headpieces bestowed on Rose Queens in days of yore.

This crown, below, was commissioned for the 75th Rose Parade in 1993. It’s described in a 2004 story from the Star-News archives as “a
large and looping number … that’s decorated with dozens of fake diamonds.”

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The crown, below, was only worn by one Rose Queen, Linda Strother, in 1968. A new crown took its place the next year.

In 1997 — and now Linda Strother McKnight — she gave an interview to the Los Angeles Daily News. She talked about how the tumultuous era eclipsed the glamour and pageantry: “In 1968, the most important thing was dealing with social unrest and the war in Vietnam. So why would anyone do anything so shallow as be a Rose Queen?”

Interestingly enough, during her years as a college student at Berkeley, she wrote her senior sociology thesis introducing a feminist critique on the institution of Rose Queen, she told the Star-News in 2002.

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The Art-Deco-explosion crown below was actually worn from 1954-1967.
 

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From 1940-1953, 14 queens rode down Colorado Boulevard wearing the crown below. The first was Margaret Huntley Main, the oldest living Rose Queen.

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During part of the 1930s, the Rose Queen’s crown was formed from a collection of bracelets and broaches. They were fashioned to fit together like a puzzle. After the parade, the pieces became mementos, inscribed with the queen’s or princess’s name, that they took home with them. This piece, below, belonged to Queen Barbara Dougall in 1939, as you can see from the engraving on the back.

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The front of some individual jewelry pieces that were once part of a whole crown. The 1939 Royal Court returned their pieces, so the Tournament would be able to display a whole collection.

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Below, what the crown may have looked like when assembled in ’39.

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And matching earrings! Today, each member of the Rose Court gets a pearl necklace and earrings from Mikimoto.

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(From file photos and staff archives)

Royalty in the making: Rose Queen and Court before-and-afters


>>LIVE

Ahead of our annual fashion shoot next week with the newly-announced 2010 Rose Queen and Royal Court, get a look at the transformation these local women have undergone in about a week.

The before photos on the left were taken on Oct. 12 at the big reveal of the seven Rose Court princesses. The after photos were taken yesterday during the announcement of Arcadia resident Natalie Innocenzi as Rose Queen.

What say you of their red, red blazers and red, red lips?

And: Did you know you can now follow the Royal Court on Twitter @therosediaries and at their official blog? The Tournament of Roses, that bastion of Pasadena tradition and ritual, is making strides into the modern era. Hello, Facebook! And YouTube. SRSLY.

Rose Princess Katherine Hernandez, 18
Pasadena, Flintridge Sacred Heart Academy
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Rose Queen Natalie Innocenzi, 16
Arcadia, Flintridge Sacred Heart Academy
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Rose Princess June Ko, 17
Arcadia, Arcadia High School
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Rose Princess Lauren Rogers, 17
Altadena, Blair High School
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Rose Princess Kinsey Stuart, 18
South Pasadena, Pasadena City College
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Rose Princess Ashley Thaxton, 17
Altadena, John Marshall Fundamental High School
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Rose Princess Michelle Van Wyk, 17
La Canada Flintridge, La Canada High School
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Top fashion critics heap praise on Pasadena-born Rodarte following New York Fashion Week showing

>>SHOP
The New York Times Style Magazine-run blog The Moment is keeping an unofficial-official Scorecard for New York Fashion Week, and like we said in our previous post on Pasadena’s (most ever?) dynamic fashion duo, Rodarte is sweeping up accolades for its Tuesday showing.
Alison S. Cohn of The Moment puts it this way:

“Tuesday’s shows provided an object lesson in how to play the Scorecard rankings game. Here’s a tip: avoid showing on the same day as wool cobweb-cheesecloth-macram creating, CFDA Women’s Wear Designer of the Year award-winning duos. If you don’t, even the finest djellaba draping can come across as, well, a little merchy.”


Check out the round-up of praise collected for Pasadena-native sisters Laura and Kate Mulleavy — the heavy hitters behind Rodarte.

And if you think Cohn’s kidding about the “cobweb-cheesecloth-macram,” see below.


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(Getty Images)