Where are they now? — Rose Queens edition

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>>PARADE

From this weekend’s CityBeats column in the Star-News:

“Upscale stores often pride themselves on giving customers the royal treatment.

Maybe the Nordstrom store at Westfield Santa Anita in Arcadia comes closest — the 1960 Rose Queen, Margarethe Bertelson (Knoblock) is a personal shopper there.”

Above and below, former Rose Queens with 2010 Rose Queen Natalie Innocenzi at the Tournament House earlier this month.

The oldest-living Rose Queen is 88-year-old Margaret Main, who took the title in 1940. She’s the one in pink in the photos.

(Getty Images)

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Pilot Chesley ‘Sully’ Sullenberger is the 2010 Rose Parade grand marshal

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>>INSIDER

The Tournament of Roses today announced Chesley “Sully” Sullenberger III as the 2010 Rose Parade grand marshal.

In January, Sullenberger rose to national attention after safely guiding US Airways Flight 1549 into New York’s Hudson River during an emergency landing.

He is a resident of Danville.

More from the TofR press release:

“Captain Sully saved the lives of 155 people and is an excellent
example of the everyday American hero,” said Jeffrey Throop, acting
president of the Tournament of Roses. “With his theme, A Cut Above the Rest,
President Gary DiSano wanted to honor those who strive to make every
effort better than the last. Sullenberger has certainly shown how we
can do that and we are honored to have him host the 2010 festivities.”

“It
has long been a family tradition to watch the Rose Parade,” said
Captain Sullenberger. “I am incredibly honored to be named the Grand
Marshal of such a revered American institution.”

[Star-News]

(Photo by Walt Mancini / Staff)

Jewelry box: Rose Queen crowns through history

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>>INSIDER

Natalie
Innocenzi of Arcadia was crowned today as the
92nd Rose Queen.

Her Mikimoto crown, set in silver, features 10 white
South Sea pearls, 632 Akoya cultured pearls and 6.09 carats in diamonds. It’s estimated to be worth more than $100,000.

This crown was introduced for the 2005 parade, and it was the first to be made of truly precious materials. Before that, it was a lot of faux glitz.

Let’s walk through some of the headpieces bestowed on Rose Queens in days of yore.

This crown, below, was commissioned for the 75th Rose Parade in 1993. It’s described in a 2004 story from the Star-News archives as “a
large and looping number … that’s decorated with dozens of fake diamonds.”

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The crown, below, was only worn by one Rose Queen, Linda Strother, in 1968. A new crown took its place the next year.

In 1997 — and now Linda Strother McKnight — she gave an interview to the Los Angeles Daily News. She talked about how the tumultuous era eclipsed the glamour and pageantry: “In 1968, the most important thing was dealing with social unrest and the war in Vietnam. So why would anyone do anything so shallow as be a Rose Queen?”

Interestingly enough, during her years as a college student at Berkeley, she wrote her senior sociology thesis introducing a feminist critique on the institution of Rose Queen, she told the Star-News in 2002.

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The Art-Deco-explosion crown below was actually worn from 1954-1967.
 

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From 1940-1953, 14 queens rode down Colorado Boulevard wearing the crown below. The first was Margaret Huntley Main, the oldest living Rose Queen.

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During part of the 1930s, the Rose Queen’s crown was formed from a collection of bracelets and broaches. They were fashioned to fit together like a puzzle. After the parade, the pieces became mementos, inscribed with the queen’s or princess’s name, that they took home with them. This piece, below, belonged to Queen Barbara Dougall in 1939, as you can see from the engraving on the back.

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The front of some individual jewelry pieces that were once part of a whole crown. The 1939 Royal Court returned their pieces, so the Tournament would be able to display a whole collection.

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Below, what the crown may have looked like when assembled in ’39.

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And matching earrings! Today, each member of the Rose Court gets a pearl necklace and earrings from Mikimoto.

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(From file photos and staff archives)

Behind the scenes: Rose Magazine’s photo shoot with the Rose Queen and Royal Court

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>>INSIDER

Here’s a quick glimpse inside our photo shoot yesterday with the seven lucky ladies of the Tournament of Roses 2010 Royal Court. We are super excited about this year’s editorial fashion spread and working with photographer Watchara Phomicinda.

Q. Can you guess the location of our shoot? (Answer, and more, below.)

The Court — with their stylist and Tournament of Roses escorts — gathers on the patio
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Princess Kinsey Stuart in the stacks
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Cramming the equipment into the small spaces between shelves was a challenge
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Princess Katherine Hernandez in front of the Peter Pan Fireplace
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That’s a pop-up “Nancy Drew” book from the children’s wing
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Queen Natalie Innocenzi in the reference section.
(A. Yes, the shoot took place in the historic Pasadena Central Library.)
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Our hot lights were Diva Lite brand, which is sort of fitting, no?
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Mood lighting in a stairwell with Princess Michelle Van Wyk
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Huge thanks to the library administration and staff — and especially the unsuspecting patrons — for allowing us to invade for a couple of whirlwind hours.

Tournament of Roses announces P. Scott McKibben as executive director

>>INSIDER

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Starting Nov. 30, McKibben will lead the professional staff and 935 volunteers who plan and stage the Rose Parade and Rose Bowl Game.

He is executive vice president and chief revenue officer for the Los Angeles Times Media Group.

McKibben replaces John M. Dorger, who has served as chief executive officer since 2000.

More from the Star-News soon.

(Press release here.)

Royalty in the making: Rose Queen and Court before-and-afters


>>LIVE

Ahead of our annual fashion shoot next week with the newly-announced 2010 Rose Queen and Royal Court, get a look at the transformation these local women have undergone in about a week.

The before photos on the left were taken on Oct. 12 at the big reveal of the seven Rose Court princesses. The after photos were taken yesterday during the announcement of Arcadia resident Natalie Innocenzi as Rose Queen.

What say you of their red, red blazers and red, red lips?

And: Did you know you can now follow the Royal Court on Twitter @therosediaries and at their official blog? The Tournament of Roses, that bastion of Pasadena tradition and ritual, is making strides into the modern era. Hello, Facebook! And YouTube. SRSLY.

Rose Princess Katherine Hernandez, 18
Pasadena, Flintridge Sacred Heart Academy
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Rose Queen Natalie Innocenzi, 16
Arcadia, Flintridge Sacred Heart Academy
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Rose Princess June Ko, 17
Arcadia, Arcadia High School
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Rose Princess Lauren Rogers, 17
Altadena, Blair High School
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Rose Princess Kinsey Stuart, 18
South Pasadena, Pasadena City College
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Rose Princess Ashley Thaxton, 17
Altadena, John Marshall Fundamental High School
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Rose Princess Michelle Van Wyk, 17
La Canada Flintridge, La Canada High School
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