Gunshot victim reported in Pico Rivera

Reported in the 9500 block of Woodview. They think a suspect ran into a nearby house…we’re listening to it on scanner if you are watching the live you can probably hear it go down.

13 thoughts on “Gunshot victim reported in Pico Rivera

  1. I hope the corrupt cops are also looking into the possibility of at old white ladies being suspects, because we all know how bald latino men with long kaki pants and long white socks are the usual suspects.

    It’s time for the corrupt cops to start investigating old white ladies.

  2. Sheriff’s deputy shot dead outside his Cypress Park home

    A 27-year-old Los Angeles County sheriff’s deputy, praised by his bosses as a “local success story” after growing up in a neighborhood entrenched in gang warfare, was gunned down Saturday outside his boyhood home in Cypress Park as he left for work.

    Law enforcement officials said the motive for the attack remained “wide open” and investigators were trying to track down a white, four-door vehicle that approached Deputy Juan Abel Escalante shortly before gunfire rang out about 5:40 a.m.

    A neighbor said she heard at least three gunshots, followed by screeching tires. A minute later, the silence was broken by screams of “My husband! My husband!” said the neighbor, who declined to give her name for fear of gang retaliation.

    Escalante’s wife and mother rushed to the deputy, who was not wearing his uniform, the neighbor said.

    Los Angeles Police Chief William J. Bratton said it was “too early to know” whether the shooting was gang related or connected to the deputy’s assignment at Men’s Central Jail in downtown Los Angeles. Deputies typically work in the county jails as their first assignment.

    Escalante, his wife and their three children were living with his parents but were preparing to buy a home in Pomona.

    The blue-collar neighborhood of modest single-family homes northeast of downtown had experienced a fragile lull in gang violence in recent years until feuding between rival groups erupted in January.

    In February, a shooting outside an elementary school a few blocks from Escalante’s home touched off a fierce gun battle between gang members and police in neighboring Glassell Park. The violence led to a massive gang raid in late June by heavily armed police and federal agents, who stormed an area around Drew Street, about a mile north of where Escalante was slain.

    While the number of gang crimes across the city of Los Angeles has fallen this year, the Cypress Park neighborhood and the surrounding northeast section of the city is among the few areas that have seen a significant rise, according to police department crime statistics. The LAPD’s Northeast Division reported 11 homicides from January through June 26, up from six over the same period last year.

    Bratton said the slaying was the first in the area since the June gang raid.

    Los Angeles County Sheriff Lee Baca described Escalante, a U.S. Army reservist and 2 1/2-year department veteran, as “dedicated and hard-charging in the best sense of the word. . . . He lived up to the dream of serving his country, serving his county and honoring his family.

    “Today is a very difficult day,” Baca said.

    Law enforcement sources, who spoke on condition of anonymity because they did not have permission to talk about the pending investigation, said detectives were pursuing a broad range of possible reasons for the attack. Among them are whether the slaying was a gang-related assassination connected to Escalante’s work at the jail, a random drive-by shooting or the result of someone’s personal grudge.

    “The best detectives in our police department are handling this case,” said Deputy Chief Sergio Diaz of the LAPD.

    Police cordoned off two blocks of Aragon Avenue between Maceo Street and Thorpe Avenue as officers blanketed the area most of the day.

    For hours, detectives knocked on doors and combed the sidewalk and street near the deputy’s home for clues. Several shell casings lay on the street. A hip-high black curtain surrounded Escalante’s body, which was covered in a white sheet, until coroner’s officials removed the body at 11:45 a.m.

    Police officials brushed nearly every inch of the deputy’s black GMC sport utility vehicle for fingerprints until it was towed away at 4:05 p.m.

    Steve Remige, president of the Assn. for Los Angeles Deputy Sheriffs, released a statement saying he was confident that Escalante’s killers would be caught.

    “Tragic events like these remind us that simply being a law enforcement officer in Los Angeles is an act of bravery,” he said. “Juan will be missed by all of us.”

    A local resident, Gloria Ruiz, said that her son and Escalante had grown up together and had both served in the military. She said he had a strict upbringing and his mother “would gleam whenever he had good grades.”

    The small working-class neighborhood north of Interstate 5 and west of the 110 Freeway is a community gripped by fear. Several neighbors agreed to talk about Escalante but refused to give their names for fear of gang violence. One resident carrying a baby said the sound of gunfire is so common that she decided not to call police when she heard the shooting.

    Another neighbor described the deputy as the eldest son of immigrant parents from the Mexican state of Yucatan. His mother worked at a candy store and his father was a construction laborer, the neighbor said.

    The neighbor said Escalante was serious and industrious and worked hard after he returned from military service, studying to join the Sheriff’s Department. He rarely talked about his work after he became a deputy.

    “If someone here knew he was a sheriff, it’s kind of like a trophy to kill one of them,” the neighbor said.

    Escalante’s death marked the first killing of an L.A. County sheriff’s deputy since Maria Cecilia Rosa was gunned down in March 2006.

    Rosa was killed in Long Beach in a botched robbery attempt as she left another deputy’s house for work at the Inmate Reception Center in downtown Los Angeles. In May, the gunman convicted in the shooting was sentenced to death. An accomplice was sentenced to life in prison.

    *******************
    The above story is in today’s L.A. Times but not the Star News?

    Let’s consider the following statements for a second.

    1) A neighbor said she heard at least three gunshots, followed by screeching tires. A minute later, the silence was broken by screams of “My husband! My husband!” said the neighbor, who declined to give her name for fear of gang retaliation.

    LB: Gunshots and screeching tires fleeing the scene of a drive-by shooting. Think the vermin who did this might have been gang members?

    2) Los Angeles Police Chief William J. Bratton said it was “too early to know” whether the shooting was gang related

    LB: How about being a man chief and say something like, “This is how low-life gangsters do business every day. That’s who I think shot him and if by some miracle I find out I’m wrong you’ll be the first to know. You all realize I am a PC coward and don’t want to offend anyone by telling the truth too soon so nobody screams at me, like my boss Little Antonio”.

    3)In February, a shooting outside an elementary school a few blocks from Escalante’s home touched off a fierce gun battle between gang members and police in neighboring Glassell Park.

    LB: So I guess it’s a gang area Chief.

    4)Detectives were pursuing a broad range of possible reasons for the attack. Among them are whether the slaying was a gang-related assassination connected to Escalante’s work at the jail, a random drive-by shooting or the result of someone’s personal grudge.

    LB: It could be either of the first two but a grudge? How many guys carry a grudge bad enough to shoot someone down in the street would bring his pals to watch? Oh yeah, that would be gang members. Got that Chief Bratton? Got that USHOLE?

    5)One resident carrying a baby said the sound of gunfire is so common that she decided not to call police when she heard the shooting.

    LB: This is the type of person who poster “USHOLE” has shown time and again he cares nothing about. People living in fear in their own neighborhood. Bet “USHOLE” thinks kids are kept in their homes in that area instead of playing out side because of the police.

    6)”If someone here knew he was a sheriff, it’s kind of like a trophy to kill one of them,” the neighbor said.

    LB: That says it all. These coawradly worms that assasinated Deputy Escalante are not human, so why treat them like they are? Should our rules of engagement change and we can just let God sort it out in the end? We are much smaller than N.Y.C. and have about three times the gang members. Do we need more midnight basketball leagues? I don’t think so. Good people outnumber the bad people in this state by a lot. I realize our law makers in California are composed of some of the biggest cowards imagineable and won’t do anything about it so is it maybe time we had a different approach to this infestation?

    Would we have already acted if roving gangs of Whites were the culprits? The answer to that is obvious so what’s stopping us now but misplaced fear of being called a racist by people like USHOLE?

  3. I can read about a movie star getting in an accident in Hollywood in the local paper or here on this blog of yours. Same with the Indy Mac debacle. Same with a house shooting in Norwalk, a lot further from here than Cypress Park. I know Larry Wilson has this standard on where a dead cop story belongs based on other dead cop stories buried in your paper, but this was kind of close, right down the freeway Frank.

    Where you’re right that the murder of the deputy made in to page 7 in the paper, this is a Crime Blog. How is it possible that it’s not here? Not the original story or any follow-up? I don’t get it.

    You know me, as far as I’m concerned it should have been page one in the Star News and the Tribune. This type of murder seems to be the type of scenario every cop fears but rarely talks about yet keeps in the back of his mind. I can’t imagine what Escalante was thinking when these cowardly m’fers rolled up on him. I can’t imagine what it was not only for his wife and kids but his parents that were there. He was fing assasinated pretty much in front of his family and it doesn’t rate any mention here?

    With all the gang issues tackled in conversations on this blog for this story to not be here is very wrong.

  4. It’s even worse than I thought, Deputy Escalante was shot from behind. I guess that’s not important and what a fucking pity I have to put it on a thread that has nothing to do with his brutal murder because it’s not even worth a fucking mention here. A decades old murder deserves nine straight threads and zero for a deputy shot down in broad daylight.

    You’ve lost it Frank.

  5. Guess it’s now against the rules of the blog to be critical of the guy who runs it. You post something it shows up. Welcome to Beijing.

  6. I meant to say “you post something like that it doesn’t show up”, sorry for the confusion. No confusing that Dep. Escalante was shot from behind, pretty much just executed and not a word from Frank.

    Inexcusable.

  7. I put up a short post about how page 7 for this story was bs and refrenced past cop deaths in southern california buried in the sgvt and psn even worse in years past. When I posted this “short post” it said it would be held awaiting approval or whatever.

    It never showed up. What am I suposed to think? Now that I’ve heard further info on this case, obviously not from reading this blog, I’m even more interested in it. I can’t believe Dep. Escalante’s murder did not rate a column and the San Marino caper has like a dozen.

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