Horse rescued after falling into well at Agua Dulce movie ranch

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AGUA DULCE >> Firefighters rescued a horse unharmed after it fell into a well on a ranch used as a movie set Saturday morning, authorities said.
The horse took a misstep and fell into a 10-foot-deep well about 11:20 a.m. at the Sweetwater Movieland Ranch, often used as film set, at 32500 Agua Dulce Canyon Road, Los Angeles County Fire Department Dispatch Supervisor Art Marrujo said.|
As captured on video and posted to @FireScannerSCV on Twitter, firefighters used
a crane to hoist the large animal from the well.
“The horse was fine,” Marrujo said. It’ didn’t even need to be tranquilized.”
The effort lasted for more than an hour and a half.

PHOTOS/VIDEO courtesy of @FireScannerSCV on Twitter

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UPDATED: Man killed in small airplane crash in Angeles National Forest north of Altadena


ANGELES NATIONAL FOREST >> A small airplane crashed in the Angeles National Forest north of Altadena Sunday morning, killing a man.
On man was pronounced dead at the crash scene, Deputy Kimberly Alexander of the Los Angeles County sheriff’s Information Bureau said. There were no initial reports of additional injuries or additional occupants aboard the plane.
Rescuers searched the Angeles National Forest near Mt. Wilson for more than seven hours before finding the crash site after the small airplane vanished from radar amid inclement weather Sunday morning, officials said.
The missing aircraft was first reported shortly after 9:10 a.m., Los Angeles County sheriff’s officials said.
“Apparently, it went off radar,” sheriff’s Lt. Randy Tuinstra said.
•Flight path of missing plane
Federal Aviation Administration spokesman Allen Kenitzer confirmed officials lost communications with the single-engine airplane.
“We have a reported missing aircraft, a Cessna 182. … Traveling from Montgomery Field in San Diego to Santa Monica Municipal Airport, he said. “Contact was lost 17 miles east of Van Nuys.”
No witnesses reported seeing the aircraft in trouble, Tuinstra said.
According to FlightRadar24.com, the aircraft’s last reported altitude was about 4,000 feet, below the elevation of nearby mountain tops.
Bad weather prevented sheriff’s department helicopters from joining the search.
“Visibility is very, very low right now,” Tuinstra said. “We’re hoping that will burn off soon and we can get a better look.”
Members of the Montrose, Altadena, San Dimas, Sierra Madre and Canta Clarita search and rescue teams continued scouring the area on the ground until the weather improved in the afternoon, allowing search helicopters to join in the operation, officials said.
BrownMapThe aircraft crash site was found near the 4,466-foot-tall Brown Mountain, in the forest north of Altadena, according to Deputy Juanita Navarro-Suarez of the sheriff’s Information Bureau.
The airplane is registered to San Diego Skylane LLC, according to FAA records. It has a valid, standard-classification flight certification.

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South Pasadena cop on first patrol and corporal rescue suicidal woman from freeway overpass


SOUTH PASADENA >> A South Pasadena police corporal and an officer on his first patrol rescued a suicidal woman who was threatening to jump from a freeway overpass Sunday afternoon, officials said.
The incident unfolded shortly after 6:10 p.m., when police received a report of a woman threatening to jump from the Prospect Avenue overpass of the 110 Freeway, South Pasadena police Sgt. Spencer Louie said in a written statement.
Nine-year department veteran Cpl. Juan Salcido and Officer Brian Wiley, who graduated Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department Academy 412 on Friday and was out for his first day of patrol, found the woman sitting on the ledge, facing the freeway, he said.
“She was hysterical and yelling while she was talking on her cell phone, threatening to jump,” Louie said. “Seeing that she was distracted while talking on the phone, Cpl. Salcido approached the female subject and grabbed her around the waist to pull her off the ledge.
“She struggled momentarily with Cpl. Salcido and with the assistance of Officer Wiley, they were able to safely get her onto the sidewalk,” he said.
The woman, 20, was taken for psychiatric evaluation, police said.

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Man bit by rattlesnake above Altadena recovering well


ALTADENA >> A mountain biker bitten by a rattlesnake in the forest north of Altadena was recovering well Saturday, his sister said.
Avid cyclist Brad Adams, 25, of Los Angeles was out for his usual Friday morning ride shortly before noon, heading up Brown Mountain Trail in the Angeles National Forest just north of Altadena, when he encountered the rattlesnake, according to his sister, Candace Adams.
“He briefly stopped at a crest to wait for his friend when a rattlesnake bit him above his right ankle without warning,” she said in an email. “He did not feel the bite until the snake had finished its assault.”
Brad realized he had been bitten, but had not cell phone reception, his sister said.
“(He) immediately hopped on his bicycle and began the 5-mile descent to the trailhead,” she said. Brad sped down the mountain as fast as he could.
“Within the 15 minutes, he said he could feel the effects of the venom course through his foot and the rest of his body,” Candace said. “It was moments after that Brad reached the base that the other cyclists had caught up. One of the cyclists managed to call 911.”
Los Angeles County sheriff’s and fire department officials treated the injured bicyclist and rushed him to a hospital by helicopter, sheriff’s Lt. Douglas Mohrhoff said.
His recovery was progressing well Saturday in an intensive-care unit, Candace said. He responded well to antivenom, and no surgery was expected to be needed.
Though he was warned that he will experience swelling for about a week and should avoid strenuous activity, she said, “He should be going home (Sunday).”

PHOTOS/VIDEO courtesy of the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department.

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Mountain biker rushed to hospital after snake bite in forest north of Altadena


ALTADENA >> Rescuers flew a 25-year-old mountain biker out of the Angeles National Forest north of Altadena for medical treatment after he was bitten by a rattlesnake Friday, authorities said.
The man stumbled upon the venomous reptile about 11:40 a.m. along Brown Mountain Trail, Los Angeles County sheriff’s Lt. Douglas Mohrhoff said.
Sheriff’s deputies, including those in department’s “Air-5” helicopter, and Los Angeles County firefighters headed up the trail and found the snake bite victim, the lieutenant said.
“He was transported by Air-5 to (Huntington Hospital in Pasadena) for further medical treatment,” Mohrhoff said.
“He was conscious at the time,” Mohrhoff said. An update on the man’s condition was not available.
With spring upon us, officials urged those recreating in the forest, conducting yard work or otherwise spending time outdoors to me mindful of rattlesnakes.
A 3-year-old girl suffered a rattlesnake bite in Chino Hills on Tuesday, according to San Bernardino Fire Department officials.
She was hiking on a trail near Soquel Canyon Road and Pipeline Avenue when she was bit in the leg, officials said. She was flown to Loma Linda University Medical Center, where she listed in stable condition.
And some experts suspect California’s long-running drought may be encouraging the snakes to slither out of their usual, more secluded habitats in search of food and water.
“As springtime calls people and snakes alike to the outdoors, encounters with snakes become inevitable,” according to a California Department of Fish and Wildlife fact sheet. “California has a variety of snakes, most of which are benign. The exception is California’s only native venomous snake — the rattlesnake.”
Though not common, it’s wise to have a plan in place in the event of a rattlesnake bite, officials said.
“Carry a portable phone, hike with a companion who can assist in an emergency, and make sure that family or friends know where you are going and when you will be checking in,” according to the CDFW statement.
If bitten, a person should stay calm; wash the bite area gently with soap and water; remove watches, rings or other items which may constrict swelling; immobilize the affected area; and seek medical care immediately.

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PHOTOS, VIDEO via Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department

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Driver rescued after car falls 200 feet over side of forest road north of Glendora

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ANGELES NATIONAL FOREST >> Rescuers hoisted an injured man from the Angeles National Forest north of Glendora Saturday after his car tumbled 200 feet over the side of a cliff, authorities said.
0416_NWS_SGT-L-RESCUE2The crash was reported at 3:55 p.m. along near Glendora Ridge Road and Glendora Mountain Road, Los Angeles County sheriff’s Lt. Thomas Reid said.
Tactical medics dropped down to the crash scene by rope before hoisting the driver, a man in his 20s, to safety and rushing him to Huntington Hospital in Pasadena for treatment, officials said. His injuries were not initially believed to be life-threatening, however, an update on his condition was not available Saturday afternoon.
The cause of the crash remained under investigation.

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PHOTO via LASD Special Enforcement Bureau.

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Deputies talk suicidal man down from bridge in South El Monte


SOUTH EL MONTE >> Deputies spent more than an hour persuading a suicidal man to climb down from a pedestrian bridge spanning a 60 Freeway offramp in South El Monte Friday, officials said.
The incident began about 7:10 p.m. on the bridge at Cogswell Road, just east of Santa Anita Avenue, Los Angeles County sheriff’s Lt. Ismael Chavez said.
Officials received reports of a man sitting atop the fence lining the pedestrian bridge, the lieutenant said.
California Highway Patrol officers shut down the Santa Anita Avenue offramp of the westbound 60 Freeway as Los Angeles County firefighters set up an air cushion below the bridge, officials said. A specially-trained sheriff’s Mental Evaluation Team was summoned to the scene to speak with the distraught man.
After more than an hour, deputies persuaded the man to climb down and accept help, Chavez said. He was taken for psychiatric evaluation.
The offramp was re-opened about 8:30 p.m., according to the CHP.

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Deputies rescue suicidal man found hanging from utility pole in Pico Rivera

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PICO RIVERA >> Deputies rescued suicidal man who tried to hang himself from a telephone pole in Pico Rivera Friday morning, officials said.
Deputies were summoned about 9:20 a.m. to the 9300 block of Wampler Street by a family member of the man, Los Angeles County sheriff’s officials said in a written statement.
“A male adult became despondent and attempted to hang himself from a telephone pole on the south side of Wampler Street,” according to the statement. A family member tried to intervene and called 911.
“(Deputies) found the man hanging from an electrical cord tied to the pole,” the statement said. “They quickly climbed the telephone pole and lifted the man up, preventing his death. Deputies cut the noose from his neck and carried him down from the pole.”
Paramedics took the man to a hospital, where he was listed in serious but stable condition, officials said.
Sheriff’s officials urged anyone thinking of hurting themselves to reach out and take advantages of resources designed to help, such as the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention hotline at 800-273-8255. For more information, visit www.afsp.org.

PHOTO courtesy of the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department.

 

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Glendora police revive man with new anti-overdose nasal spray

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GLENDORA >> Police used a newly-obtained anti-overdose nasal spray for the first time Saturday to revive a man overdosing on heroin in Glendora, officials said.
The incident unfolded shortly before 11 p.m. at a home in the 800 block of East Route 66, Glendora police Lt. Rob Lamborghini said in a written statement.
Officers responding to a report that a 31-year-old man had overdosed on heroin found the patient unconscious in an bathroom “in respiratory distress,” Lamborghini said.
“His breathing was very shallow and slow and his pulse was weak and slow,” he said. “Other signs of an opiate overdose were observed by the officers, two of whom are trained emergency medical technicians.”
The officers administered a dose of nasal naloxone, or Narcan, just as paramedics arrived at the scene.
The drug, which was first obtained by the department six months ago, is used to help reverse respiratory arrest caused by opiate drugs such as heroin or prescription painkillers.
“Within a minute and a half he was breathing more normally and his pulse rate rose significantly. He was treated by paramedics and was taken to Glendora Community Hospital where he regained consciousness and fully recovered,” Lamborghini said.
The Glendora Police Department became the first Los Angeles County law enforcement agency to be authorized to use the anti-overdose drug — known as nasal nolaxone, or Narcan — in April.
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Five Glendora police officers and one community service officer, who are also trained as EMTs, carry the spray, officials said. They also carry oxygen, which, in conjunction with Narcan, can be very effective in reviving overdose victims.
The program was introduces after police noticed a significant increase in both incidents of heroin possession and overdoses in recent years, officials said at the time.
The U.S. Centers for Disease Control have noted a national “epidemic” of increasing heroin use nationwide.
“Between 2002 and 2013, the rate of heroin-related overdose deaths nearly quadrupled, and more than 8,200 people died in 2013,” according to a CDC statement.
Glendora police have long been at the forefront of marrying new medical technology with law enforcement duties.
In 1997, the department first in Southern California to issue portable defibrillators to all of its officers, officials said.

PHOTO: A dose of nasal naloxone, or Narcan, phorographed on Sept. 2, 2015. (Stephan Savoia/Associated Press)

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UPDATED: Brand new deputy resuscitates lifeless driver along 210 Freeway in Pasadena

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VIDEO: Sheriff’s Jim McDonnell discusses freeway rescue

PASADENA >> A sheriff’s deputy less than two weeks out of the academy, along with three other good Samaritans, is credited with resuscitating and saving the life of a man found pulseless on the 210 Freeway following a car crash earlier this week, officials said.
Deputy Jason Flores who graduated the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s academy Sept. 4, spotted a car that had crashed into the center divider along the eastbound 210 Freeway near Madre Street in Pasadena as he was on his way home from work about 3:30 p.m. Wednesday, Los Angeles County sheriff’s officials said.
“The male adult driver was unresponsive inside the locked vehicle, prompting the deputy and another passerby, to spring into action as they risked their own lives by stopping on the busy freeway,” Sgt. John Glynn said in a written statement.
The young deputy forced his way into the car an unlocked a door to reach the unconscious driver, he said.
“Deputy Flores realized the driver was not breathing and did not have a pulse,” Glynn said. “Deputy Flores instructed the passerby to call 9-1-1 and request medical assistance, while he started to perform (CPR).”
As Flores continued CPR, “the driver gasped for air and had a faint pulse,” the sergeant said.
Two off-duty nurses stopped at the scene to assist before California Highway Patrol officers and paramedics arrived to take over treatment and rush the injured driver to 0919_NWS_PSN-L-FREEWAY2a hospital, officials said. The victim’s heart stopped twice during the ambulance ride, but was resuscitated both times by emergency medical personnel.
Doctors rushed the man into emergency surgery, authorities said.
The driver, a 60-year-old Brea man, was listed in stable condition Friday, sheriff’s spokeswoman Nicole Nishida said.
Further details regarding the circumstance of the crash were not available.
Flores had basic CPR training prior to joining the sheriff’s department, “but he credits the majority of his life-saving skills and techniques to the Sheriff’s Academy Recruit Training Program,” Glynn said.
Having just graduated the academy, Flores, 23, has not yet received his formal duty assignment, sheriff’s spokeswoman Nicole Nishida said. He will most likely be assigned to the Men’s Central Jail in Los Angeles.

PHOTOS: [TOP] – LASD Deputy Jason Flores (courtesy). [BELOW] – Los Angeles County sheriff’s Deputy Jason Flores receives his badge from his grandfather, retired Deputy Jimmy Jackson, upon graduating the sheriff’s Academy on Sept. 4, 2015. (Courtesy)

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