UPDATED: More than 300 arrested at raves in Pomona, San Bernardino; no major incidents reported


POMONA >> Tens of thousands of electronic music lovers swarmed to electronic music concerts in Pomona and San Bernardino over the Halloween weekend, resulting in more than 300 arrests, but no major incidents, authorities said.
The HARD Day of the Dead took over the Fairplex at Pomona Saturday and Sunday, while the Escape: Psycho Circus filled The National Orange Show Events Center in San Bernardino with the sounds of electronic dance music Friday and Saturday.
The rave in Pomona was the first held at the Fairplex since two young women died of suspected drug overdoses at the HARD Summer Festival rave in early August, drawing renewed scrutiny of raves from Los Angeles County supervisors.
In Pomona, police reported making 148 arrests Saturday, which was the first day of the two-day festival.
“Nearly all arrests were made at the security screening area or outside the venue, prior to entry,” Pomona police officials said in a written statement.
The vast majority of arrests were related to public intoxication, being under the influence of drugs, possession of drugs for personal use or sales, police said. Fifty people were arrested for having fake IDs, and officers arrested 10 allegedly intoxicated drivers at and around the Fairplex.
Guests noted the crowd at the Fairplex appeared smaller than previous electronic music concerts at the venue. The last event, HARD Summer Festival, was open to guests ages 18 and older. HARD Day of the Dead only admitted people 21 and over.
Police estimated 16,000 to 17,000 people attended HARD Day of the Dead on Saturday. HARD Summer Festival, by comparison, attracted about 65,000 to the two-day event.
“It’s hard to dissect any of this yet,” said Pomona Police Chief Paul Capraro said as he monitored the entrance checkpoints. “I’m hoping people think we did out job. I think it’s good to note we’re making it a safer event.”
Two “amnesty boxes” provided a place for people to throw away contraband with no questions asked before entering the venue.
“We had fewer medical issues. We didn’t have any other issues,” Capraro said.
There was a strong law enforcement presence at both the Pomona and San Bernardino events this weekend.
California Highway Patrol officers drove up and down the aisles in the parking lot, as Pomona police handed out anti-drug fliers encouraging concert-goers to “Play hard, not high.”
“There’s a lot more police here. It makes it a lot harder to focus on having fun,” said Amanda Lopez, 24, of Chatsworth. “It feels like someone is breathing down my back.”
While officers were making arrests of those who ignored warnings not to bring drugs to the Fairplex, they were also working to engage the public, Capraro said. “We’re also talking to people.”
Statistics regarding any possible overdoses or other injuries related to the concert treated at Pomona Valley Hospital Medical Center were not available Sunday, hospital spokesman Frank Garcia said.
In San Bernardino, 193 people were arrested during the two-day event, with 86 people arrested Friday and 107 people arrested Saturday, according to the San Bernardino County Sheriff’s Department, which collaborated with the San Bernardino Police Department for event security.
The event attracted more than 40,000 people Friday night, promoters said. A crowd estimate from Saturday was not available.
Officials did not give details about the arrests at the San Bernardino concert.

PHOTO by Jennifer Cappuccio Maher

Facebook Twitter Reddit Tumblr Linkedin Email

Homeboy Alex Sanchez gets no bail, but it’s ain’t over yet

From Celeste Fremon at Witness LA:

Here’s what she writes:

Alex Sanchez had a second bail hearing on Wednesday afternoon. He did not get bail. Nor was he denied it.

Alex, if you’ll remember, is the former MS-13 gang member turned highly honored gang intervention leader and head of the well-regarded nonprofit, Homies Unidos. A month ago, Sanchez was named in a federal racketeering indictment and accused of plotting the murder of a rival gang member. The case alleges Sanchez was leading a double life: while a good guy by day, by night he was the premier shot caller–AKA leader–of a particularly violent clique of MS-13.

At the last bail hearing held on June 30, 110 people wrote letters of support–including city leaders and a wide array of clergy. Friends and colleagues put up $1.2 million in surities against any bail. To sweeten the deal, Tom Hayden put up his house toward the hoped for bond. Sanchez was denied bail anyway.

Sanchez’s attorney appealed the bail decision, and Wednesday’s hearing was the result. But rather than settle the matter, U.S. District Judge Manuel L. Real decided to continue the bail issue until August 17, nearly a month from now.

On the surface this might sound like just another case of justice delayed.
But, there is a lot more to this story.

In case you are interested, here’s a copy of the Alex Sanchez indictment.
And, a piece written by Tom Hayden for The Nation.

Facebook Twitter Reddit Tumblr Linkedin Email