Shopping for linemen? … Things are bitterSweet at Amat … Find you at the “A”?

Francisco Perez. Who? Exactly. Francisco Perez, dang it! I guess it’s partly our fault that you probably haven’t heard of Perez. We obviously missed the boat with our All-Area team when it came to Perez. He is a 6-foot-5, 300-pound senior-to-be offensive lineman from currently head coach-less Baldwin Park. Perez has DOMINATED the offseason buzz around these parts. Perez is/has been actively shopped all over town. First, the hot rumor was that he was headed to La Mirada. Okay fine. Who isn’t transferring to LM this offseason? Then the word was Perez was headed to Bishop Amat. Now, the buzz is possibly Charter Oak … but more likely Cathedral. And yet as far as anybody knows, Perez is still at Baldwin Park. It stands to reason that a lineman of Perez’s size would garner this kind of interest. After all, they’re in high demand and short supply. Stay tuned for his final destination. Speaking of Cathedral, bet you didn’t know that Arcadia hired former Cathedral assistant Robert Maxie. And in typical Cathedral form, Maxie is already getting after it on social media while trying to perhaps “attract” talent over to Campus Drive (see below). The eligibility of former St. Francis standout receiver Dylan Crawford, who transferred to Santa Margarita this offseason is in the “pending” phase, according to the CIF website. The case is awaiting “former school’s response” … which should be interesting. And finally, it’s been argued on this blog in the past that the catalyst for Bishop Amat’s mid-season turnaround in 2014 was the emergence of running back Torreanho Sweet. Once Sweet was inserted into the starting lineup, poof, Amat had a good ground game and the offense was darn near unstoppable. That also led to linebacker Anthony Camargo being able to focus solely on defense, and so on. And Sweet is (or was) one of the key returners for the Lancers … or so everyone thought. Turns out, Sweet is currently no longer part of the football program. He’s playing baseball for Amat but according to several sources is off the football team for some sort of violation. Will Sweet transfer? Will he be reinstated? Stay tuned … True SGV football veterans will agree that there was a time not long ago that under these circumstances a guy like Sweet and unseated Amat QB Damian Garcia would both be starting for Uncle Greg over at Los Altos next season.

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Is that legal?

  • reality

    Like coach Norman Dale said in “Hoosiers”. “We play with the boys we have not the boys we don’t have”. So who ever this Maxie dude is, coach the players you have.

    • Spock

      Everytime I feel a little down about getting out of coaching I read these blogs, see how the new fool in town is conducting himself and realize that with what is’s becoming I’m glad I have new things to do with my time.

  • sir lancelot

    Who ever this kid is he will never know how good he is until he plays with the big boys. His best bet would be to go to Amat and see how he matches up with D1 caliber type of kids. He looks good in his hudl account but what level of competition is he playing?? He should challenge himself and go to Amat or any other D1 school. Some kids get them scholarships and sit on the bench cuz the level of speed they are not use to.

  • The truth and nothing but…

    If he truly wants a D1 scholarship there is but a handful of school he should go: La Mirada, Buena Park, Salesian, Monrovia, and Santa Margarita. These schools have proven themselves year after year when it comes to college scholarships.

    • sir lancelot

      Amat will have a heavy class with plenty of scholarships going out. Trust me. Look at their schedule

    • Mean Joe Green

      He can either play for high school football fans or he can play for himself. He can go to a lot of places and get exposure, street cred and newspaper write ups, but you are right about your assessment. If he is looking for a scholarship, he needs to go to a school where the coaches are committed to getting their kids to the next level.

    • The heck you say

      What are you talking about? There are plenty of schools all over So. Cal. getting kids out on to D1 Schools. Olu, Bosco, Mission, Muir, LB Poly, Hart, Centennial, Norco, Vista, Upland, Rancho, Servite, Crespi, Chaminade, Serra, and the list continues. The key factor in getting kids out to D1 programs still remains the talent level of the players.

      • The truth and nothing but…

        I wrote my post in 30 sec and name the schools that immediately came to mind who had been getting players to the next level CONSISTENTLY the past 4 to 5 years. From your list, I would agree SJB, LB Poly, Centennial, Upland, Chaminade, and Serra also does a good job but these schools also have a lot of 4 or 5 star recruits. Servite? Really? Several top players have transferred to La Mirada the past two seasons and have gotten offers they otherwise would not have gotten had they stayed. Hart? Besides White and Irwin and maybe one or two here and there, who else have they helped? My original list also took into consideration these schools get kids to the next level, not only D1, by doing a good job of marketing them. In other word, colleges did not find many of these kids because they were 4 or 5 star recruits. These coaches were able to defied the cliche, if you are good colleges will find you. For example, Anthony White got two 5’3″ players full NAIA scholarships and another who missed his entire senior season due to a knee injury a 59K offer from a D3 program. I hope these helped with my thought process when naming those schools.

        • Mean Joe Green

          Great points. It is easy to get a 4 to 5 star recruit a college scholarship. A lot of these 4 to 5 star recruits hop around like crazy. They can afford to do so, because they know that the schools that they go to do not matter. They know that recruiters are going to find them wherever they go. A school’s ability to attract 4/5 star recruits does not impress me. What impresses me is a school that can consistently get kids into college despite being under the radar or not fitting into the mold of a D1 athlete. For most of these kids (the ones with their heads on right), they could give a crap about D1, D2, D3. They are only concerned with the school that will pay for their education and allow them to continue to play a game that they love. I would send my kid in a heartbeat to a public school that consistently finds D2 scholarships. Keep in mind, many of these SGV kids can’t afford private schools, or their parents don’t have the freedom to drive them everyday to Ventura County or Los Angeles. As a result, they have to stay in the SGV to play. So hats off to schools like Monrovia, Muir, Glendora, West Covina and others who give our SGV athletes a reason to stay home. Those schools (forgive me if I missed some) show our kids that you can stay home, save your money, play Division 8 high school football and still get a scholarship.

        • Don

          Two “full NAIA scholarships”? Really? Who? Where?

          NAIA schools only have 24 football scholarships to spread among the entire squad so a kid with a “full” ride would be pretty unique indeed. A more likely scenario would be a 1/2 athletic grant with the rest in loans and/or combinations of scholastic or other types of aid.

          But I’m sure you already knew that.

          • The truth and nothing but…

            Does any coaches, students, parents, or anyone else for that matter care how a school pays for a student-athletes college tuition as long as it is paid for? Yes, maybe it is paid for by a combination of athletic scholarships, academic scholarships, Federal Pell Grants, school grants, subsidized, and unsubsidized loans. Stay on point, we were talking about schools and coaches that can help a student-athlete get a free education and continue to play some more football in the process. But I am sure you already knew that.

          • Don

            Oh, simple you want?

            Transfer to LB Poly; if that doesn’t fly, pick a Catholic Pac-5 school.

          • Mean Joe Green

            What’s wrong with that?

          • Don

            My point was not about the type of grant but how it was presented by ‘the truth and nothing but…’ in his post. That’s why I used quotation marks on the “full NAIA scholarships” part.

            Every year we get reports here, on Freddie’s, and on the Mid Valley blog about athletes receiving “scholarships” for a variety of sports when in reality what happened is the kid was just accepted to
            a school and states he/she wants to play.
            Those following up the next season can’t find the athlete on the school’s roster and no word anywhere as to whether the player is even still in school.

            Reporting these choices as athletic “scholarships” does a disservice to kids who aspire to one because it presents something very rare as common. Make no mistake, it’s not easy playing sports in college and my hat is off to anybody who makes a team and even more so to one who finds substantial time on the field at any level but going out for football at Whittier College or Pomona-Pitzer while
            paying your own way is a looooong way from having USC or LSU spend a quarter
            mil to move a football stud through undergrad. Loooong way.

            D3 schools offer no athletic grants
            although they can be quite creative in finding tuition money for gifted athletes. As stated before, NAIA may offer grants to players totaling 24 full rides, D2 has 36 to work with. These schools may divvy them up whatever way works but ¼ and ½ schollies are lots more common than full rides.

            For example, APU, a D2 school, shows an online roster for last season’s team of 100+ players. Terrell Watson and Chad
            Jefferies might have their ticket fully punched, along with maybe a stud lineman or shut down DB but everyone else, I suspect, s getting a partial. Simple math.

            It’s about clarity, and truth and it’s about being honest with kids who hang their hopes on their shoulder pads. Great to have dreams but it’s better to make sure the kid gets good grades and maybe even put a few bucks aside every payday for college. Just in case that gig a ‘Bama
            doesn’t work out.

          • Mean Joe Green

            I totally agree that a full ride at USC is not the same as merit grants at a D3 school or partials at a D2. However, dollar for dollar, the grant money from a D3 school can oftentimes be more valuable monetarily than that of a D1. The problem is not that we are misleading our kids about scholarships, the problem is that we are only giving them half truths about the glory of a D1 scholarship.

            In reality, D1 scholarships are far harder to maintain than that of a D2 or merit grants of a D3. All scholarships are renewed annually. Therefore it is extremely difficult to keep a D1 scholarship in highly competitive environments like Bama or USC. In the Ivy League and the D1-AA Pioneer League they only offer merit/needs based grants. Many of these schools do this to maintain academic integrity. For a scholar athlete with a GPA above 3.5, I would most definitely recommend one of these schools. It would allow the kid to get a quality education and not be put through the competitive football grinder that they might be subjected to at a D1-A school.

            All kids want to go D1-A. The problem is when we as adults do not educate them on the downside of those scholarships. We only talk about how rare it is to achieve one. Therefore they all grow up wanting to be the kid that hits the lottery. They grow up looking at NCAA academic eligibility requirements as the goal. They are so hell bent on going D1-A that they see no need to get the 4.0 GPA. So, when the bubble finally bursts, they find themselves without a D1 scholarship and not good enough grades to go anywhere else in life. So they spend the next few years in JUCO chasing a dream. I can name three to five kids off the top of my head in the SGV that went D1-A in the last three years that are now either sitting at home or at lower division schools. All that glitter is not gold. Coaches and the media really need to educate these kids that the right college may not be right for them.

    • Jastrab

      Norberto Garrido (sp) Went to Workman (as I recall) as received a full ride to USC. If you are 6’6″ 280 to 310 and can run a 4.9 to 5.2 and have good footwork they will find you. There just are not that many boys (excuse me) men that have that size and speed.

  • Valley Athletics

    Perez already has a couple offers. He should just finish his senior year with his friends.

  • Mean Joe Green

    I totally agree that a full ride at USC is not the same as merit grants at a D3 school or partials at a D2. However, dollar for dollar, the grant money from a D3 school can oftentimes be more valuable monetarily than that of a D1. The problem is not that we are misleading our kids about scholarships, the problem is that we are only giving them half truths about the glory of a D1 scholarship.

    In reality, D1 scholarships are far harder to maintain than that of a D2 or merit grants of a D3. All scholarships are renewed annually. Therefore it is extremely difficult to keep a D1 scholarship in highly competitive environments like Bama or USC. In the Ivy League and the D1-AA Pioneer League they only offer merit/needs based grants. Many of these schools do this to maintain academic integrity. For a scholar athlete with a GPA above 3.5, I would most definitely recommend one of these schools. It would allow the kid to get a quality education and not be put through the competitive football grinder that they might be subjected to at a D1-A school.

    All kids want to go D1-A. The problem is when we as adults do not educate them on the downside of those scholarships. We only talk about how rare it is to achieve one. Therefore they all grow up wanting to be the kid that hits the lottery. They grow up looking at NCAA academic eligibility requirements as the goal. They are so bent on going D1-A that they see no need to get the 4.0 GPA. So, when the bubble finally bursts, they find themselves without a D1 scholarship and not good enough grades to go anywhere else in life. So they spend the next few years chasing a dream. I can name three to five kids off the top of my head in the SGV that went D1-A in the last three years that are now either sitting at home or at lower division schools. All that glitter is not gold. Coaches and the media really need to educate these kids that the right college may not be right for them.