Review: Mass Effect 3: Leviathan DLC

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The new “Leviathan” DLC pack for “Mass Effect 3″ falls so far below this reviewer’s expectations that everyone at BioWare and EA Games who had a role in developing or marketing this add-on needs to pull out a dictionary and look up the word “promise.”

Webster’s New World College Dictionary (Fourth Edition) defines a promise as “1. An oral or written agreement to do or not to something; vow. 2. Indication, as of a successful prospect or future; basis for expectation 3. Something promised.”

In a sentence: “The Leviathan DLC for Mass Effect 3 does not deliver what its advertising promised.”

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Review: “Sleeping Dogs” (PS3)

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By Neil Nisperos

Staff Writer

For those who have ever dreamed of being in a Kung Fu movie or Hong Kong crime thriller, Square Enix’s new “Sleeping Dogs” offers that kind of experience, even if it is not a perfect sandbox game.

Sleeping Dogs allows players to explore the complex and labyrinthine environs of Hong Kong while assuming the role of Wei Shen. Shen is a fearless Hong Kong police officer who infiltrates a Hong Kong Triad criminal organization. Going undercover in the game’s version of Hong Kong means players enter a world of high-speed chases, shady business deals, shakedowns and bone-breaking beat downs.

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Review: NCAA 13

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Texas State receiver demonstrating one
of the newly added catch animations against my Teambuilder squad…
still not sure how he got that open.

By Jahmal Peters

Contributor

Summer is a great time of year for
college football fans.

It’s a time of year when every fan
believes that their team is poised to achieve greatness no matter how
outlandish the expectations may be and it’s only after the season
begins that the cold hard reality sets in and they are once again
reminded of their team’s place near the bottom of the food chain.

While college football fans can enjoy a
few more months of unwavering optimism, their gaming playing
brethren won’t be as lucky.

EA Sports’ NCAA Football 13
is the latest iteration of the company’s annual college
football game, and with minimal updates and an overemphasis on DLC,
the game is more UCLA than USC – promising but a long way from
dominant.

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Review: Inversion

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“Inversion,” with a little
more imagination, could have been one of the nicer surprises of 2012.
Instead, the game is a basic third-person shooter that never fully
lives up to its promise of offering players a chance to “command
gravity.”

Maybe I’m guilty of expecting too much
from this game, but I wanted Inversion’s gravity-control mechanics to
be something that would result in a fresh re-imagining of the TPS
experience. I imagined a game in which my character would be able to
leap from floor to ceiling at will, run upside down with guns
a-blazing and create havoc at any point along the X, Y and Z axes.

That, unfortunately, is not what
Inversion delivers. The game has its moments, but Inversion is
largely a linear experience that builds enough goodwill with its
gravity-control conceit to make things interesting for a while before
bringing things down with repetitive gameplay.

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Review: Mass Effect 3: Extended Cut (Spoiler free)

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Angry and even not-so-angry gaming enthusiasts can now download new ending sequences for “Mass Effect 3,” a very good game marred by a conclusion that, to many, put the “anti” in “anti-climactic.”

EA Games and BioWare released “Mass Effect 3″ in March, but the role-playing game’s real ending did not come out until Tuesday when the producers released an “Extended Cut” to appease fans who hated the science fiction trilogy’s original conclusion.

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Review: LEGO Batman 2 (PS3)

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Lego Batman 2 is Traveller’s Tales’ sequel to 2008′s Lego Batman. This time, Traveller’s has opted for an open-world approach while maintaining the mission-oriented focus of the previous title. And it even features spoken dialogue. But while it does a number of new things for the franchise, it also arrives with a host of annoying bugs that drag the experience down.
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Review: Lollipop Chainsaw (X360)

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Suda 51 doesn’t just design games. He and his crew at Grasshopper Manufacture lovingly drip the paint from their imaginations onto a digital drop cloth to create some of the most unusual settings, characters, and storylines to be pressed onto plastic. In as much as their ideas ooze crazy atmospherics, the gameplay has also lived up to the technicolor rain around it.

Lollipop Chainsaw is the latest from the eclectic designer and features everything that you might expect from a high school cheerleader ripping through hordes of zombies with the decapititated head of her boyfriend talking occasional smack. Most everything, anyway, but I’ll get to that later.
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Review: Kid Icarus: Uprising (Better late than never, right?)

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“Kid Icarus: Uprising” is the
first Nintendo release to bear the Kid Icarus moniker in more than
two decades and its blend of humor, mythological references, dynamic
visuals and old-school sensibilities are almost enough to make the
title one of the great ones.

The only really big problem – and it is
a big one – is the game’s control scheme. The unfortunate fact is
that although the Nintendo 3DS handles Kid Icarus: Uprising’s visuals
just about perfectly, the game’s controls are about as unwieldy as
can be. It’s telling that Nintendo included a special stand with the
game so players could set the game on a table instead of twisting
their wrists into an unnatural position in order to handle the 3DS’
buttons, circle pad and stylus at the same time.

It’s a shame the control scheme mars
Kid Icarus: Uprising’s gameplay, because this could be an ideal game
for anybody who grew up on the Nintendo Entertainment System and
still appreciates Nintendo’s zany approach to game design. Kid
Icarus: Uprising has enough wacky dialogue and flashing lights to
entertain just about anyone who doesn’t need all of their video games
to be grimdark and ever so “mature.”

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Review: The Witcher 2: Assassins of Kings: Enhanced Edition

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The Witcher 2: Assassins of Kings:
Enhanced Edition is many things – some good, some not – but it is
certainly a demanding game.

Indeed, The Witcher 2 is a role-playing
game that demands at least two playthroughs just to make sure one
gets a taste of its entire plot. The idea of offering players a
chance to make meaningful choices is a big one in modern games, and
The Witcher 2 not only challenges players by forcing them to choose
from many tactical options, but also forces them at an early point in
the game to decide which storyline they wish to follow.

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