The Tao of Vin Scully XI: Chris Fisher

As a professional play-by-play man, what can you learn about your craft simply by listening to Vin Scully today?

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== Chris Fisher (linked here), the first-year USC basketball broadcaster:

“Growing up in the Bay Area, my affiliation lies deep with the San Francisco Giants and have spent most of my life listening to Jon Miller and Duane Kuiper call games. When given the chance to hear Vin Scully though, it is always difficult to turn the channel because there is a high level of intrigue.

“First and foremost, he is the best reminder to be a student of your craft. That goes for the game itself, the people involved and broadcasting. Everyday there is something new to learn on almost every front, and every time he tells a story it should be a reminder for every young broadcaster to stay within themself.

“He has decades of experience and knowledge and I have five years so don’t try to replicate or be something I’m not or else I’m entirely inauthentic. Being a student and letting your passion carry you will help this process move organically and Vin is a tremendous example.

“From a broadcasting nuts and bolts perspective, it’s important to keep the call simple. There is an eloquent simplicity to what he says which allows him to relate to fans. Without a connection to the audience your voice might as well be mute. As a result, I’m constantly striving to find a median of consistency during the peaks and valleys of games while staying within means.

“If you really examine and breakdown what Vin does — whether during exciting action plays or a 12-pitch sequence — his description is elementary to the point that anyone can understand what is taking place but also extremely articulate. Keep the game simple and don’t try to do too much.”

“You don’t have to listen to a game very long to know the game itself is most important — not the broadcaster or his opinion. This foundation is perhaps the most important element because the information that he conveys is always relevant to what is unfolding.”

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