The London dozen for page flipping: The full list

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Somehow, this Smurf-arific piece of literature missed the cut … but you if you can find it used for $2.99, we wouldn’t object at this link….

Thanks again to David Davis for adding his insights on how he went head-on into finding out more about how the 1908 Olympic marathon played out in “Showdown at Shepherd’s Bush” in today’s “Writing On (and off) the Wall” column (linked here).

A link to a the review of the book we did earlier in the week on the blog (linked here).

Here are the other 11 books we singled out as ones worth tracking down before the 2012 Games begin on Friday:

== “The Complete Book of the Olympics: 2012 Edition” by David Wallechinsky and Jaime Loucky (linked here)

== “Igniting the Flame: America’s First Olympic Team” by Jim Reisler (linked here)

== “Munich 1972: Tragedy, Terror and Triumph at the Olympic Games” by David Clay Large (linked here)

== “Redemption: A Rebellious Spirit, A Praying Mother and the Unlikely Path to Olympic Gold” by Bryan Clay (linked here)

== “Gold” by Chris Cleave (linked here)

== “The Price of Gold: The Toll and the Triumph of One Man’s Olympic Dream” by Marty Nothstein (linked here)

== “Off Balance: A Memoir” by Dominique Moceanu (linked here)

== “Winning Balance: What I’ve Learned so far about Love, Faith and Living Your Dreams” by Shawn Johnson (linked here)

== “In The Water, They Can’t See You Cry: A Memoir” by Amanda Beard (linked here)

== “The Treasures of the Olympic Games: An Interactive History of the Olympic Games” by the Olympic Museum in Lausanne, Switzerland (linked here).

== “How to Watch the Olympics: The Essential Guide to the Rules, Statistics, Heroes and Zeroes of Every Sport” by David Goldblatt and Johnny Acton (linked here)

A 13th book: Maybe we could have included Jack McCallum’s “Dream Team: How Michael, Magic, Larry, Charles, and the Greatest Team of All Time Conquered the World and Changed the Game of Basketball Forever” (Random House, $28, 384 pages, linked here). But we’re OK really not going to buy into the premise.

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