Sunday media: Vin Scully memories, from this media member — it was always a personal touch that explained his greatness

A photo we took of Vin Scully on Opening Day 2014 as he was preparing for that game's telecast. We had to leave the booth moments later when we received the news that our father-in-law was very ill and close to passing away, meaning we drove straight from Dodger Stadium to Yuma, Ariz.

A photo we took of Vin Scully on Opening Day 2014 as he was preparing for that game’s telecast. We had to leave the booth moments later when we received the news that our father-in-law was very ill and close to passing away, meaning we drove straight from Dodger Stadium to Yuma, Ariz.

We’ve got some Vin Scully mementos around here, aside from the usual bobbleheads and stadium giveaways.
A chunk of the pink terrazzo stone that was from the original Hollywood Walk of Fame plaque honoring Scully on Hollywood Boulevard just a few steps away from Musso & Frank Grill. They had to replace it about five years ago because it suffered from cracking after some street and sidewalk repair.
img_6786A signed ball that includes the inscription: “To Tom, God Bless ….”
A baseball card, No. 65, made by the Panini company in 2013 to honor those in the Baseball Hall of Fame. It lists his debut as April 18, 1940. They’re only 10 years off. Does that make the card more valuable?
Value is not from taking advantage of someone making a mistake, but in being unmistakably great.
In the spring of 2011, we asked 20-some broadcasters and a college professor to assess what lessons could still be learned by listening to the then-83 year old Vin Scully call games.
The response was so tremendous, we had to keep expanding the space to run the series. It was from a story in January to a revisit in April to a blog post series that should be printed in a manual and given to all aspiring broadcasters.
Now, in the fall of 2016, on Oct. 2, we don’t need to ask anyone about the lessons learned by watching the now-88-year-old Scully enter the extended autumn of his career. We’ve seen and lived them, and tried to repeat them.
The greatest baseball broadcaster ever, without a question, even if we don’t have access to tapes of all those who came before him, and will only have a limited amount of time to hear those who come after.
But again, that’s not the legacy he has set out to leave.
The greatest person you’d ever want to meet? And care about? And protect and defend? And do anything for when requested?
Veni, vidi, Vinny.
We’ve enjoyed giving this space to others in the media to log their memories of Scully. Now we’ll try to reciprocate with our Sunday column at this link …

= Previous 20 Scully media memory stories:
= Ross Porter, Charley Steiner and Dick Enberg
= Joe Davis and a second entry later.
= Fred Claire
= Derrick Hall
= Josh Rawitch
= Joe Jareck
= Mark Langill
= Toby Zwikel
= Steve Brener
= John Olguin
= Brent Shyer
= Jon Weisman
= David Vassegh
= Jon SooHoo
= Matt Vasgersian
= Ken Korash
= Tim Mead
= Ryan Lefebvre

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