It’s Out of the Question: Does sports do it right with the transfer of power?

Out with the old (David Stern) and in with the new (Adam Silver) NBA style, in 2014.

Out with the old (David Stern) and in with the new (Adam Silver) NBA style, in 2014.

The congenial transfer of power happens all the time in the sports world.
No great displays of angst. Very little conflagrating egos.
C-SPAN doesn’t even bother to cover it, as the whole process comes off as even too phlegmatic for them.
Just nothing more than a rubber stamp and a press release. The public apparently not need to concern itself with how its favorite pro sports leagues altered the course of their future.
From commissioner to commissioner, the mission is to keep things peaceful, prudent and profitable. And private.
Apparently, that’s transparency at its finest?
When do the fans who are most invested with time, ticket purchases and crocodile tears become an essential part of this important process?
It all seems rigged.
More at this link ….

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Sports media notes version 01.19.17: Another chapter unfolds in Jim Bouton’s ‘Ball Four’ story

IMG_7410If a fire, earthquake, flood or another insane Act of God ever threatened the foundation of my home, and there appeared to be just a couple of minutes to grab some prized possessions before bolting out the door, I’d spend more than a few seconds contemplating how many of the seven hard- and paper-back editions of Jim Bouton’s “Ball Four” books  could be carried out with care.
They have maintained an esteemed spot on the book shelf over the decades. Most of them are personally signed.
There are mix emotions reading that that Bouton’s family has decided to sell off a collection of the quirky materials he used to take notes on during the writing process involved in the 1970 classic — not just cassette tapes, but notes taken on air-sickness bags from airplanes, napkins, cereal boxes, index cards, whatever was available.
But more disheartening is to also read that the 77-year-old Bouton suffered a recent stroke and is unable to correspond well — something I fully appreciated in a back-and-fourth of emails correspondences over the years. And something that just seems impossible based on his personality and curiosity about life and society.
Less than three years ago, the Boston Globe had this story about how Bouton was still “opinionated as ever.” Now …

Jim Bouton, right, with wife Paula, talk with Jean Hastings Ardell and David Kipen at the Burbank Library in 2010. (John McCoy/Daily News staff photographer)

Jim Bouton, right, with wife Paula, talk with Jean Hastings Ardell and David Kipen at the Burbank Library in 2010. (John McCoy/Daily News staff photographer)

The Baseball Reliquary celebrated Bouton at the Burbank Central Library in September of 2010 for a 40-year recognition of “Ball Four,” and it was a special afternoon indeed, including the panel discussion with two of Bouton’s former Seattle Pilots teammates — Tommy Davis and Greg Goossen. Bouton was inducted into the organization’s Shrine of the Eternals in 2001.
Terry Cannon, the Baseball Reliquary executive director, said several years ago Bouton send him a binder that itemized the contents of his collection as he started to think about a home for it. Cannon says the binder is now part of the collection at the Institute for Baseball Studies at Whittier College.
“I knew that he wanted to sell the materials so that he would have money to leave behind for his family,” said Cannon. “Although it would have been a wonderful addition to the Reliquary and Institute collections, neither organization has any money in their budgets for an acquisition of this size. What I was hoping to do was find a library or museum that might have the financial wherewithal to purchase Bouton’s archive, but I just couldn’t see an appropriate fit in Southern California. Since Bouton never played or lived here, and it just seemed to me that an East Coast repository made more sense.
“Of course, I was delighted that Jim wanted to sell the archive as one lot, and not sell it off piecemeal, as is often the case when former players decide to liquidate. Having the collection go to one individual or organization makes it more likely that it will be displayed for the public to see, and that organizations like the Reliquary or Institute might be able to borrow pieces for exhibition purposes.
“With the 50th anniversary of ‘Ball Four’ coming up in 2020, there is bound to be many organizations celebrating this milestone. I know that the Reliquary and Institute will be. It would be wonderful if we would be able to access a few pieces from Bouton’s archive to share with our audience at that time.”

SCP Auctions in Laguna Nigel is handling the auction of lot #468, which ends Saturday. Starting bid was $50,000, it is up to $97,000 but the reserve has not been met yet.
The collection includes: Continue reading

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Sunday media: On the 50th anniversary of the first ‘Super Bowl,’ you remembered …

From the Feb. 11, 1967 issue of "The Beat" produced by KRLA, the 1110-AM rock station in L.A. (http://krlabeat.sakionline.net/issue/11feb67.pdf)

From the Feb. 11, 1967 issue of “The Beat” produced by KRLA, the 1110-AM rock station in L.A. (http://krlabeat.sakionline.net/issue/11feb67.pdf)

Some of Sunday’s media column marking the 50th anniversary of the NFL-AFL championship played at the Coliseum on Jan. 15, 1967 includes remembrances from those who saw the game.
Or try not to misremember things they saw that day versus things they’ve seen in video and film and photographs since then.
doityourselfI was just a 5-year-old, not sure I even knew how to operate the black-and-white TV at our L.A. home with the needle nosed pliers fully engaged in changing the channels.
In addition to those in the column, we have these submissions:

== Lance Barrow, CBS Sports producer who has been the producer of four Super Bowl broadcasts and part of another eight as an assistant to Pat Summerall:

Continue reading

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It’s Out of the Question: Two NFL deplorables for the price of one?

NEW LALALANDRemember that scene in the movie “La La Land,” where the Rams’ magnificent mascot, Rampage, trips the night fantastic in a flamboyant ballroom dance number with the Chargers’ macho mascot, Boltman?
They drift across the starlit sky above the Griffith Park Observatory, observing everything and nothing wrong about what they’re doing.
All loosely based on a true horror story.
City of stars, are you shining for the NFL?
City of stars, two deplorables now — what the hell?

More at this link …

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Friday media: Take my picture, Jon SooHoo

Dodgers photographer Jon SooHoo at Dodger Stadium on Wednesday. (Photo by Hans Gutknecht, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)

Dodgers photographer Jon SooHoo at Dodger Stadium on Wednesday afternoon. (Photo by Hans Gutknecht, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)

Jon SooHoo might have been in the comfort zone of family, friends and admirers. But in a strange way, he was also struggling with an image problem.

There are so many images he’s taken and processed through his camera lens over the years – on film, on slides, now digitally, since working for the Dodgers the last 32 years after graduating from USC – that it takes him many additional hours to compile the best of them when asked to make a group presentation.

Jon SooHoo talks about his work as he's being photographed at the Chinese Historical Society of Southern California meeting on Wednesday night.

Jon SooHoo talks about his work as he’s being photographed at the Chinese Historical Society of Southern California meeting on Wednesday night.

Picture this: More than 100 gathered at the Castelar Elementary School auditorium for the monthly meeting of the Chinese Historical Society of Southern California on Wednesday night. It was special not just for the opportunity to soak in the highlights of SooHoo’s career that has resulted in thousands of impactful shots from Rose Bowls, Super Bowls, Lakers, Kings and Clippers as well as from a Space Shuttle launch in Florida.

But as SooHoo fielded questions from the audience after the showing four slideshows put to music, there was an abundance of pride at the way the SooHoo legacy continues to carry importance in the community.

More at this link.

Dodgers photographer Jon SooHoo during a press conference at Dodger Stadium, Wednesday. (Photo by Hans Gutknecht, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)

Dodgers photographer Jon SooHoo during a press conference at Dodger Stadium, Wednesday. (Photo by Hans Gutknecht, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)

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