At the half: UW 47, UCLA 44

Tyler Lamb has 12 points for the Bruins, on 4 of 6 shooting from the field, including 2 of 3 from beyond the 3-point line. Travis Wear and Lazeric Jones each have 11 for UCLA.

Washington’s C.J. Wilcox has a game-high 15 points, helping the Huskies to a 16-5 edge in bench scoring. Terrence Ross has 13 for the UW and Tony Wroten has 11. Abdul Gaddy has a career-high 10 assists by halftime.

There were two ties and three lead changes.

UW shooting 52.9 percent from the field (18 of 34), while UCLA at 55.2 percent (16 of 29).

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Bruins battle back

UCLA pulls within 47-44 at half, thanks dunk by Travis Wear, who then took a charge at the other end. Last-second 3-point try that would have tied it missed.

Will update when get the halftime stats.

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UW up

My apologies, still having some computer issues so haven’t been able to update as much as I’d like. Promise will keep trying.

Washington up 30-22 with 7:17 left in first half, thanks to 3-point shooting.

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AssistINTROS: Noel Mazzone Pt. 3

Throughout the week, I’ll be bringing you some of the opening words from the new UCLA assistant coaches. A very energetic group, with a common purpose. We’ll continue with new UCLA offensive coordinator Noel Mazzone, who came to the Bruins from Arizona State.

Jon Gold: Probably your most important task this year will be to find a productive starting quarterback, and I’m reminded by something Trent Dilfer said about elite quarterbacks, like Aaron Rodgers, Peyton Manning, Eli Manning, Drew Brees. If you put a bunch of them in the car, who would get the keys and drive? How does that relate to UCLA?

Noel Mazzone: Here would be my rebuttal to Trent’s statement. If you have that group of guys that you’re trying to decide who you’re giving the keys to, that car would never move an inch. All five of them sumbitches are going to be fighting over the keys. That’s the guy I’m looking for. Competition builds great football teams. Competition builds championships. I tell these guys when I recruit them, you may be Scout, Rivals, ESPN, whatever, five-star prospect and you know what I’m going to do next year? I’m going to find a guy to beat you out. That’s how it should be. ‘You’re my guy for the next four years?’ No. I’m getting a guy to beat you out. And if he doesn’t beat you out, guess what? He’s getting you better every day. We’re looking at that for every position.”

JG:You got things turned around at Arizona State in a snap. What makes you think you can do that with this group? Faith in the system? Faith in your personality? Faith in the players?

Mazzone: It’s faith in the whole program. Alright? First of all, you are UCLA. Right? There’s a lot of good football players on this football team. There always is. I want my kids to play with confidence, shouldn’t I have confidence in what I’m preaching? Shouldn’t I be committed to what I’m coaching if I want them committed? Shouldn’t I have a passion for what I’m coaching, if I want them to have passion? Any coach you talk to can tell you that answer. Honestly, I’m a very short term goal guy. I really believe in the idea all I’m going to do is play the next play, and if I put enough of those good next plays together, it turns into good things. That’s how I want our players to look at it.”

JG: One of the things I think I’ve realized in watching so much football the last few years is that the difference in talent is not as important as the difference in tempo and speed of a team. Crispness. When you inherit a team, how do you start to improve that? What’s the first step in that? Have you taken that first step, or does that happen in the spring or even fall?

Mazzone:No, I think it started the first day Jim Mora showed up on campus. You look at the pace he put together he put together a staff, you look at the pace we took to make arguably a top-10, top-15 recruiting class. If I want you to play fast, I have to coach you fast, we have to practice fast. We have to be accountable. All those attributes you’re looking for in a really successful program, it’s not just done on the field. You have to do that in the classroom, meeting room, when you take your girlfriend on a date. You have to live it. I keep thinking I want guys who have a passion for what he’s doing. Those are the people I want to be around.”
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AssistINTROS: Noel Mazzone Pt. 2

Throughout the week, I’ll be bringing you some of the opening words from the new UCLA assistant coaches. A very energetic group, with a common purpose. We’ll continue with new UCLA offensive coordinator Noel Mazzone, who came to the Bruins from Arizona State.

Jon Gold: I’ve spoken to players at Oregon, and they’ve said the system doesn’t allow for second-guessing or losing confidence. Is that the tone you’re trying to set?
Noel Mazzone: “That’s our whole thing. Play the next play. What happened the last play has no affect on the play that’s coming up. We’re not going to sit around and mope about it or cheer about it, get pissed about it. It freakin’ happened. Go to the next one. That’s why I call another play so fast. If you watch the Oregons, the Houstons, the Oklahoma States, the West Virginias, the ASU’s of the world, there’s a lot of times where guys aren’t blocked, it just doesn’t happen, because you’re playing at such a pace.”

JG: How do you go about breaking those bad habits that come from an offense so dissimilar to yours?
Mazzone: “I believe this about coaching – you get what you coach for. If you want a methodical, in the huddle … and there’s nothing wrong with it, there’s tons of different ways about to move the football; this is by no means cornering the offensive football. Hell, 60 percent of what I’ve got I stole from somebody anyway, that’s how football is. You look at Stanford, great example. That’s a pound it, huddle, ball control offense and have they had a little success? It’s the style you play, no matter if you’re the Stanfords or the Oregons, that’s what you coach for, to have that personality as an offense. These are 18 to 21-year-old kids, and if they buy in, that’s what we’ll have. I honestly don’t even really that in my mind of what was here before. We live our life like that. We play the next play. It’s right at the moment.”

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