Report: Shabazz Muhammad’s father took loan on son’s potential earnings

The saga just never seems to end.

A year after Shabazz Muhammad finished his UCLA basketball career, the controversy he left in his wake continues to swirl. On Wednesday, BuzzFeed reported that his father, Ron Holmes, had taken out a loan based on Muhammad’s future earnings — something that could again run foul of NCAA investigators.

Three months ago, Holmes pleaded guilty to conspiracy to commit federal fraud. That came nine months after the Los Angeles Times revealed that Holmes had falsified Muhammad’s age, making him a year younger with the likely hope of furthering his basketball career.

The latest revelation appears in a court document from Holmes’ legal case obtained by BuzzFeed. In it, Assistant U.S. Attorney Daniel R. Schiess writes that Holmes told the FBI on March 21, 2013, that he had been “living on a loan tied to his son’s projected earnings as a top NBA prospect.” Continue reading

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Ron Holmes pleads guilty to conspiracy to commit fraud

Former UCLA star Shabazz Muhammad’s father, Ron Holmes, pleaded guilty today to conspiracy to commit federal fraud.

According the the Las Vegas Review-Journal, Holmes is cooperating in the investigation into his $2.5 million mortgage fraud scheme, one that involved helping straw buyers acquire loans on at least three different Las Vegas properites. Two bank fraud counts are being dismissed.

Holmes agreed to pay $1.7 million in restitution, and will be sentenced on March 13. He could face two to three years in prison, according to the Los Angeles Times.

Muhammad, the 14th overall pick in the last NBA draft, has scored eight points in 33 minutes this season.

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Shabazz Muhammad’s father indicted on federal fraud charges

At this rate, Ron Holmes probably won’t be in New York for next month’s NBA draft.

According to the Las Vegas Review-Journal, Holmes — the father of former UCLA star Shabazz Muhammad — was indicted Thursday on federal bank fraud and conspiracy charges.

Holmes, who also attracted controversy for falsifying his son’s age, is accused fraudulently acquiring mortgages to purchase — and later sell — Las Vegas properties between 2006 and 2009. The U.S. attorney’s office wants $2.5 million from Holmes.

He has pleaded not guilty, is detained as he awaits a detention hearing Friday afternoon.

Holmes isn’t new to this type of crime. The L.A. Times previously revealed that, in 1999, Holmes had pleaded guilty to using false bank statements and tax returns to acquire mortgages. He agreed to use only his birth name as part of his probation release conditions, and was sentenced to six months’ house arrest.

The best move may be for Holmes to cut a deal and pay up, especially with Muhammad on the cusp of an NBA career. The Pac-12 Co-Freshman of the Year, whose age Holmes also falsified, will make at least $1.5 million his first season should he become a lottery pick.

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Muhammad’s father reportedly lied about son’s age

A Los Angeles Times report today revealed that UCLA star Shabazz Muhammad’s age is not 19, but 20.

The article explores how Muhammad’s father, Ron Holmes, carefully crafted a path to athletic success — one that included fudging his son’s year of birth.

Muhammad’s birthday had long been reported as Nov. 13, 1993, and was listed as such in the UCLA media guide. However, a copy of his birth certificate obtained by the Times lists it as Nov. 12, 1992. Continue reading

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Howland on Shabazz: ‘This was his last game at Pauley Pavilion’

Ever since his hype as the nation’s top recruit, UCLA freshman Shabazz Muhammad has been almost universally regarded as a one-and-done — bound for the NBA Draft after his spending a season showing off his wares in college.

After the Bruins beat Arizona 74-69 in their last home game of the season, coach Ben Howland said he expected that to still hold true.

“I’m very much a realist now,” Howland said. “I knew going into this that it was a one-year deal. And it should be. He’s a lottery pick. He’s a top-five pick. When you have that going for you, it is absolutely the right thing for him. That was his last game at Pauley Pavilion, no doubt about it. Continue reading

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